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Showing posts with the label The Guardian

News Alert I Iran shoots down US drone

Julian Borger 5-6 minutes Iran says US ‘spy’ drone was flying in its airspace amid strained relations over last week’s oil tanker attacks A US Navy Global Hawk surveillance drone. Photograph: Erik Hildebrandt/US Navy Iran has shot down an US drone in the strait of Hormuz, accusing Washington of breaching Iran’s national sovereignty and trying to deepen tensions in the region. Iran’s Revolutionary Guards said on Thursday that they had used a surface to air missile to shoot down what they called a US “spy” drone they claimed was flying in the country’s airspace. US Central Command confirmed that one of its unmanned aircraft had been taken down, but said it was in international airspace. A CentCom spokesman, Capt Bill Urban said it was a US navy Global Hawk surveillance drone, which had been downed by an Iranian surface-to-air missile over the Strait of Hormuz at 11.35pm GMT. “Iranian

News I The Guardian: Google blocks Huawei access to Android updates after blacklisting

Lily Kuo 7-9 minutes Google has suspended Huawei’s access to updates of its Android operating system and chipmakers have reportedly cut off supplies to the Chinese telecoms company, complying with orders from the US government as it seeks to blacklist Huawei around the world . Google said it was complying with Donald Trump’s executive order and was reviewing the “implications”, after Reuters initially reported the story. It later said Google Play and the security features of Google Play Protect would continue on existing Huawei devices but the next version of its smartphones outside China would lose access to popular applications and services including the Google Play store, Maps and the Gmail app. Chipmakers such as Intel, Qualcomm, Xilinx, and Broadcom have told employees they will not supply chips to Huawei until further notice, Bloomberg reported on Monday, citing people familiar with the matter. Huawei will continue to have access to the version of the

Morning mail: boat scare founders, Brexit delay, Dolly Parton's world

Helen Sullivan 10-13 minutes Good morning, this is Helen Sullivan bringing you the main stories and must-reads on Monday 25 February. Top stories The Morrison government’s border protection offensive has failed to turn around negative voter sentiment, according to the latest Newspoll , with Labor still ahead on the two-party-preferred measure 53% to 47%. The latest survey, published by the Australian on Sunday night, has Labor’s primary vote on 39% and the Coalition’s on 37%. The survey was taken at the tail end of a brutal parliamentary week, where senior government figures were embroiled in controversies, ranging from the finance minister, Mathias Cormann, forgetting to pay for private travel arranged through a Liberal party office holder and donor, and Michaelia Cash facing a fresh barrage of criticism for failing to provide a witness statement to police investigating a leak from her office. Scott Morrison will today deliver a speech in Me

Trump: EU must take back 800 Isis fighters captured in Syria

Patrick Wintour 7-9 minutes Donald Trump has told the EU it must take back its 800 Isis fighters captured in Syria by US-backed forces and put them on trial. The president’s call came as he prepared to claim the end of the caliphate in north-west Syria with the fall of the final Isis-held town. Some EU countries, notably France, have said they are preparing to take back their former jihadists, but the UK has been more resistant: it says the fighters held by the west’s Syrian Kurd allies can only return if they seek consular help in Turkey. The UK government says it faces a dilemma, especially concerning the wives or children of British fighters, and a major challenge either to prosecute the fighters or prevent them from undertaking terrorist acts in their homeland. Trump tweeted: “The United States is asking Britain, France, Germany and other European allies to take back over 800 Isis fighters that we captured in Syria and put them on

Border security deal reached to avert another US shutdown

Tom McCarthy 5-7 minutes Agreement allocates $1.4bn to border security, far less than $5.7bn demanded by Donald Trump Democratic and Republican negotiators have agreed to finance construction of new barriers along the US-Mexico border as part of a deal to avoid another government shutdown. The tentative agreement allocates nearly $1.4bn to border security, far less than the $5.7bn demanded by Donald Trump. It allows for the construction of 55 miles of new fencing, built through existing designs such as metal slats, instead of the 215-mile concrete wall demanded by Trump in December. The deal still needs to be approved by Congress and signed by the president. At a rally in El Paso, Texas, on Monday night, Trump said he had been informed about the committee’s progress, telling the crowd: “Just so you know, we’re building the wall anyway.” Negotiators have been trying to reach a deal to fund nine government departments that part

State of the Union: Donald Trump attacks Mueller and Democrats in divisive speech

Lauren Gambino 9-12 minutes Donald Trump issued sharp warnings to Democrats, including that “ridiculous partisan investigations” would harm economic progress, in comments that clashed with an appeal for unity during his first State of the Union address to a newly divided Congress. “If there is going to be peace and legislation, there cannot be war and investigation,” Trump declared. The presence of Democratic House speaker Nancy Pelosi on the dais behind him was an acute reminder of the political challenges he faces in the next two years. Trump’s remarks were an apparent reference to the investigation, led by special counsel Robert Mueller, into Russian meddling in the US election, plus Democrats’ promised oversight investigations into the president’s conduct and personal finances. In wide-ranging remarks to a joint chamber of Congress on Tuesday night that lasted more than 80 minutes, Trump appealed to two areas of his base supporters by reasserting

banks' mea culpa, Townsville floods, death of a missionary

Helen Sullivan 10-12 minutes Good morning, this is Helen Sullivan bringing you the main stories and must-reads on Monday 4 February. Top stories Australia’s big banks have launched a public mea culpa in the lead-up to the release of the findings of the banking royal commission today, acknowledging they have failed their customers , and arguing that the Hayne report is a chance to reset the sector. The chief executive of the Australian Banking Association, Anna Bligh, said banks had “not lived up to the high standards Australians rightly expect of the industry”. With the banks facing their day of reckoning, and the government response in the spotlight, the shadow treasurer, Chris Bowen, will use the Chifley oration to lay down markers in the economic policy debate in the run-up to the federal election. The South Australian Centre Alliance senator Rex Patrick is calling for cotton exports to be banned in an attempt to draw attention to the p

'Clear risk of recession' for UK manufacturing - business live

Angela Monaghan 12-15 minutes 8m ago 11:10 Oddbins calls in administrators Off-licence chain Oddbins has gone into administration More sad times for the UK high street as off-licence chain Oddbins is the latest retailer to call in administrators. Guardian correspondent Jasper Jolly reports: Oddbins, the chain of more than 100 off-licences, has fallen into administration for the second time in a decade, putting 550 jobs at risk. Duff & Phelps were appointed as administrators, having previously warned staff that job losses were likely as it explored options for the company following a difficult Christmas. The stores will continue to operate in the short term while the administrators look for a buyer of the company and its assets. Oddbins, which started in 1963, was bought by European Food Brokers (EFB) - owned by Walsall-based entrepreneur Raj Chatha - in 2011 when it previously fell into administration. The a

Venezuela: Maduro accuses US of trying to 'get hands on our oil'

Tom Phillips 5-7 minutes Embattled president warns Donald Trump he risks turning country into new Vietnam Nicolás Maduro: ‘If the US intends to intervene against us they will get a Vietnam worse than they could have imaged.’ Photograph: AFP/Getty Images Venezuela’s president, Nicolás Maduro , has accused Donald Trump and the “group of extremists around him” of plotting to topple him in order to seize Venezuela’s oil, and warned he risked transforming the South American country into a new Vietnam. In a four-minute Facebook video – published as Venezuela prepared for a day of fresh pro-opposition protests on Wednesday – Maduro claimed the leaders of the US “empire” were conspiring “to get their hands on our oil – just like they did in Iraq and in Libya”. Unable to accuse Venezuela’s government of stockpiling weapons of mass destruction, they were instead waging a media campaign of fake news to justify intervening in a country