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Showing posts with the label The Economist Politics this week

The Economist Politics This Week: Highlights of new Coverage From 14th - 20th May 2011

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Highlights from The Economist online's Politics this week » Israel and Palestine: Spring for Arabs, winter for Jews » South Africa's local elections: The ruling party is challenged » Elections in Italy: A blow to Berlusconi » The queen in Ireland: Irish, and British, eyes are smiling » North Korea: In a league of its own » Singapore's Lee Kuan Yew: Not fade away » The Republican nomination: The silence of the right » Haiti's new president: Martelly takes over » At least 14 protesters were shot when Palestinians sought to cross Israel's borders with Lebanon, Syria, the West Bank and Gaza. The demonstrators were marking the day of the naqba , or catastrophe, the term Palestinians use for Israel's birth in 1948. Binyamin Netanyahu, Israel's prime minister, said his country's sovereignty had to be defended. See article » Libya's oil minister, Shokri Ghanem, was reported to have defected, the highest

The Economist Politics this week

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Highlights from The Economist online's Politics this week » Removing the Qaddafis: Crunch time in Libya » Syria's president: Ever more embattled » Nigeria's presidential election: The real thing » Japan: Silenced by gaman » India's vanishing Communists: Red and buried » Cuba's Communist congress: The start of a long, slow goodbye » Finland's election: Race to the Finnish » Croatia and Serbia: Protest days »  Get more access to The Economist online Register  |  Print Subscription  |  Digital Subscription Already a subscriber? Activate your online account » A coalition of mainly Western countries continued to bomb pro-government military targets in Libya , as Muammar Qaddafi's forces intensified their siege of Misrata, Libya's third city and the closest one to Tripoli that is in rebel hands. Barack Obama was urged by the rebels and by many in the West to provide more aircraft that can attack

The Economist Politics this week

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Highlights from The Economist online's Politics this week » Removing the Qaddafis: Crunch time in Libya » Syria's president: Ever more embattled » Nigeria's presidential election: The real thing » Japan: Silenced by gaman » India's vanishing Communists: Red and buried » Cuba's Communist congress: The start of a long, slow goodbye » Finland's election: Race to the Finnish » Croatia and Serbia: Protest days »  Get more access to The Economist online Register  |  Print Subscription  |  Digital Subscription Already a subscriber? Activate your online account » A coalition of mainly Western countries continued to bomb pro-government military targets in Libya , as Muammar Qaddafi's forces intensified their siege of Misrata, Libya's third city and the closest one to Tripoli that is in rebel hands. Barack Obama was urged by the rebels and by many in the West to provide more aircraft that can attack

The Economist Politics this week

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Highlights from The Economist online's Politics this week » Removing the Qaddafis: Crunch time in Libya » Syria's president: Ever more embattled » Nigeria's presidential election: The real thing » Japan: Silenced by gaman » India's vanishing Communists: Red and buried » Cuba's Communist congress: The start of a long, slow goodbye » Finland's election: Race to the Finnish » Croatia and Serbia: Protest days »  Get more access to The Economist online Register  |  Print Subscription  |  Digital Subscription Already a subscriber? Activate your online account » A coalition of mainly Western countries continued to bomb pro-government military targets in Libya , as Muammar Qaddafi's forces intensified their siege of Misrata, Libya's third city and the closest one to Tripoli that is in rebel hands. Barack Obama was urged by the rebels and by many in the West to provide more aircraft that can attack t

The Economist Politics This Week

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World Politics    |    Business & Finance    |    Science & Technology    |    Economics    |    Culture    |    Newsletters Highlights from The Economist online's Politics this week » Libya: Where will it end? » Yemen's president: On his way out » Syria: Next on the list? » Egypt: Yes they can » Gaza and Israel: Not immune » Japan: A crisis of leadership, too » Japan: Come back in ten years' time » Afghanistan: How long?

The Economist Politics This Week

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» Japan’s government struggled to contain an unfolding nuclear disaster at its Fukushima Dai-ichi power complex, about 240 kilometres (150 miles) north-east of Tokyo. After an earthquake of magnitude 9.0, the biggest in Japan’s modern history, and the devastating tsunami it triggered, at least four of the complex’s six reactors suffered damage, and there was some leakage of radiation. Radiation levels around the plant at times rose sharply, leading at one point to the evacuation of workers trying to control the disaster. See article » The number of dead and missing after the earthquake and tsunami stood at more than 14,000 by mid-week and was expected to climb. Around 500,000 people were rendered homeless and endured desperate conditions in temporary shelters, with no electricity and freezing weather. » A number of foreign embassies and firms withdrew their personnel from Tokyo . But the government insisted that the 35m people in the Tokyo area faced no imme

The Economist Politics This Week

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Politics this week Mar 3rd 2011 From The Economist print edition Fighting between forces loyal to Libya’s leader, Muammar Qaddafi, and his opponents in the east grew fiercer. He remains in control of Tripoli, the capital, and is battling to seize back towns under rebel control. Western and Arab leaders discussed whether a no-fly zone should be imposed. See article The UN said that the humanitarian situation caused by the fighting was dire, with more than 100,000 refugees from Libya in makeshift camps across the borders with Egypt and Tunisia. The UN suspended Libya from the Human Rights Council; the International Criminal Court opened an investigation into possible crimes against humanity committed by Libya’s leaders. See article The Egyptian prime minister, Ahmed Shafiq, stepped down, as did the Tunisian prime minister, Mohamed Ghannouchi. Protests continued in both countries, with pro-democracy campaigners complaining about the slow pace of reform a

The Economist : Politics this week

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Politics this week Feb 10th 2011 From The Economist print edition Tunisia’s interim president assumed the power to rule by decree, as the interior ministry suspended the former ruling party, the Constitutional Democratic Rally. Its officials will no longer be allowed to meet and its offices are to be closed down. See article Kuwait’s interior minister resigned from the government following revelations about torture in prisons. The Kuwaiti emir accepted the resignation after critics called for political reforms in the wake of demonstrations in Egypt and Tunisia. The head of the Sudanese government, Omar al-Bashir, accepted the result of the secessionist referendum in ten southern provinces that is expected to lead to the formation in July of an independent state, which will probably be called South Sudan. According to the final count, 98.8% of the almost 3.9m registered voters approved the split. Gross injustice Cuba charged Alan Gross, whom the United St