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Showing posts with the label Real Time Economics I WSJ

Real Time Economic I WSJ : Brexit, Trade Talks and Protests, Oh My

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Real Time Economics Prime Minister Theresa May postponed a Brexit vote she was all but certain to lose, and French President Emmanuel Macron is  promising tax cuts and higher wages to mollify protesters. What's next for Europe? Good morning. Jeff Sparshott here to take you through key developments in the global economy. We'll also look at the start to U.S.-China trade talks, trouble filling low-skill jobs, the economics of climate change and one of Asia's worst-performing currencies. Let us know what you think by replying to this email.   My Offer Is This: Nothing British Prime Minister Theresa May delayed a parliamentary vote on her proposal to leave the European Union, throwing her Brexit plans into disarray . Parliament was poised to reject the deal. Mrs. May plans to meet with European leaders to try to drum up support for changes to the withdrawal agreement, though EU officials appear unlikely to budge. "I remain convinced that t

Real Time Economics: U.S. Labor Market Is the Best On Record for High-School Dropouts

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Real Time Economics The Trump administration is talking tougher on U.S.-China trade and Beijing is finally starting to detail its understanding of the weekend trade truce.  Good morning. Jeff Sparshott here to take you through key developments in the global economy. We'll also look the U.S. labor market, China's efforts to acquire American technology, French protests and an ominous sign for the economy. Let us know what you think by replying to this email. Programming note : Real Time Economics will publish a special edition following Friday's jobs report. Look for us in your inbox.   Devil in the Details China is beginning to flesh out details of a weekend tariff truce with the U.S. For the first time Wednesday Beijing acknowledged it agreed to a 90-day deadline. Key government agencies and China’s supreme court, meanwhile, announced tough punishments for infringing on intellectual property—a prominent complaint by the Trump administration. Toge

Real Time Economics I WSJ

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Real Time Economics Suddenly, the global economy isn’t looking so great. German and Japanese GDP shrank in the third quarter, momentum in China is vanishing, oil prices are tanking, the U.S. and China are still sparring over trade, and the big U.S. fiscal stimulus is set to fade as deficits grow. Good morning. Jeff Sparshott here to take you through the day's top economic news. It’s not all glum: Germany and Japan were hit by temporary factors, cheaper oil could help consumers, and Amazon is set to add 50,000 jobs and sop up spare office space along the East Coast. Let us know what you think by replying to this email.   Breaking Bad The global economy took a bad turn last quarter with gross domestic product in Japan and Germany—the world’s third- and fourth-biggest economies—contracting. Japan’s economy slid 1.2% annualized , while Germany’s fell 0.8% . Third-quarter growth in the eurozone was a scant 0.7%, the lowest since early 2013. During the