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Showing posts with the label CBS NEWS Coverage of Breaking Space News

CBS NEWS Coverage of Breaking Space News: Debris passes station; crew returns to normal operations

CBS NEWS Coverage of Breaking Space News 08:15 AM, 06/28/11: Debris passes station; crew returns to normal operations By WILLIAM HARWOOD CBS News KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FL--The six-member crew of the International Space Station took shelter in two Russian Soyuz spacecraft early Tuesday because of a predicted close approach by an unknown piece of space debris. Radar tracking indicated the debris could pass within about 820 feet of the space station at 8:08 a.m. EDT (GMT-4), but no impact was detected and the crew was told to resume normal operations. "We are currently at TCA plus four minutes and you are clear to egress Soyuz," Kjell Lindgren radioed the crew from mission control in Houston at 8:12 a.m., four minutes after the time of closest approach. "Copy that. Thank you," replied Expedition 28 flight engineer Satoshi Furukawa. Safety procedures are put into effect when radar tracking indicates debris could pass within an imaginary box around t

CBS NEWS Coverage of Breaking Space News

CBS NEWS Coverage of Breaking Space News 07:35 AM, 06/28/11: Space debris prompts station crew to 'shelter in place' aboard Soyuz spacecraft By WILLIAM HARWOOD CBS News KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FL--The six-member crew of the International Space Station was told to seek shelter in two Russian Soyuz spacecraft early Tuesday because of a predicted close approach by an unknown piece of space debris. "Sheltering in place" aboard the Soyuz crew ferry craft is standard procedure when radar tracking indicates debris will pass within an imaginary "box" around the space station that takes into account tracking errors to provide a margin of safety. "We have a fourth update from (tracking) and the probabilities are still in the red threshold and we are still planning to have you shelter in place," a flight controller radioed from Houston a few minutes before 7:30 a.m. EDT (GMT-4). "The time of closest approach is still 12:08 GMT (8:08 a.

CBS NEWS Coverage of Breaking Space News: 310a 6/1 Update: Shuttle Endeavour ends final mission with smooth landing

By WILLIAM HARWOOD CBS News/Kennedy Space Center KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FL--Signaling the beginning of the end for NASA's storied shuttle program, the Endeavour plunged back to Earth Wednesday, closing out its 25th and final flight and passing the baton to its sistership Atlantis, which was hauled to the launching pad a few hours earlier for blastoff July 8 on the program's final voyage. With commander Mark Kelly and pilot Gregory Johnson at the controls, Endeavour dropped out of a moonless sky and into the glare of powerful xenon floodlights after a fiery descent from orbit, settling to a ghostly touchdown on runway 15 at 2:34:51 a.m. EDT (GMT-4). Barreling down the 300-foot-wide landing strip at more than 200 mph, Johnson deployed a large red-and-white braking parachute, Kelly brought the nose down and Endeavour coasted to a stop on the runway centerline. "Houston, Endeavour. Wheels stopped," Kelly radioed in a traditional call to Houston. "O

CBS NEWS Coverage of Breaking Space News: -- Posted at 11:40 PM EDT, 05/31/11: Endeavour astronauts close payload bay doors, prep shuttle for landing -- Updated at 12:02 AM EDT, 06/01/11: Updating deorbit ignition time, burn duration; fixing typos

By WILLIAM HARWOOD CBS News/Kennedy Space Center KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FL--Commander Mark Kelly and his five crewmates rigged the shuttle Endeavour for re-entry and landing early Wednesday to close out the orbiter's 25th and final mission, the next-to-last flight for NASA's iconic orbiter. With forecasters predicting good weather, Kelly and pilot Gregory Johnson planned to fire Endeavour's braking rockets at 1:29 a.m. EDT (GMT-4), setting up a landing at 2:35 a.m. As recovery crews gathered at the Kennedy Space Center's 3-mile-long shuttle runway to welcome Endeavour back to Earth, another team of engineers began hauling the shuttle Atlantis to launch pad 39A for work to ready the ship for blastoff July 8 on the shuttle program's final flight. Atlantis' crew -- commander Christopher Ferguson, pilot Douglas Hurley, flight engineer Rex Walheim and Sandra Magnus -- marveled at the view as the spaceplane, mounted atop a powerful crawler-transporter

CBS NEWS Coverage of Breaking Space News: 11:40 PM EDT, 05/31/11: Endeavour astronauts close payload bay doors, prep shuttle for landing

By WILLIAM HARWOOD CBS News/Kennedy Space Center KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FL--Commander Mark Kelly and his five crewmates rigged the shuttle Endeavour for re-entry and landing early Wednesday to close out the orbiter's 25th and final mission, the next-to-last flight for NASA's iconic orbiter. With forecasters predicting good weather, Kelly and pilot Gregory Johnson planned to fire Endeavour's braking rockets at 1:29 a.m. EDT (GMT-4), setting up a landing at 2:35 a.m. As recovery crews gathered at the Kennedy Space Center's 3-mile-long shuttle runway to welcome Endeavour back to Earth, another team of engineers began hauling the shuttle Atlantis to launch pad 39A for work to ready the ship for blastoff July 8 on the shuttle program's final flight. Atlantis' crew -- commander Christopher Ferguson, pilot Douglas Hurley, flight engineer Rex Walheim and Sandra Magnus -- marveled at the view as the spaceplane, mounted atop a powerful crawler-transporter

CBS NEWS Coverage of Breaking Space News -- Posted at 11:47 PM EDT, 05/30/11: Astronauts test Endeavour's re-entry systems, prep for landing Wednesday -- Updated at 05:10 AM EDT, 05/31/11: Entry flight director briefing; updated forecast

By WILLIAM HARWOOD CBS News KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FL--The Endeavour astronauts tested the shuttle's re-entry systems overnight Monday and began packing up for landing early Wednesday to close out the orbiter's 25th and final voyage. "After Endeavour comes to a stop on the runway, hopefully in Florida, it'll head off to a museum," commander Mark Kelly told CBS News in an orbital interview. "It's certainly bittersweet. The space shuttle's been the workhorse of the U.S. space program for better than 30 years now, so it'll be sad to see it retired. But we are looking forward to new spacecraft and new destinations and we're all excited about the future." If all goes well, Kelly and pilot Gregory Johnson will fire Endeavour's braking rockets at 1:29 a.m. EDT (GMT-4) Wednesday, setting up a landing on runway 15 at the Kennedy Space Center around 2:35 a.m. to wrap up a 6.5-million-mile voyage spanning 16 days and 248 orbits.

CBS NEWS Coverage of Breaking Space News: 1215a 5/30 Update: Shuttle Endeavour undocks from space station

By WILLIAM HARWOOD CBS News KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FL--The shuttle Endeavour undocked from the International Space Station for the 12th and final time late Sunday, backing away for a fly-around photo survey before moving back to within 1,000 feet or so to test navigation sensors and software intended for use in NASA's next generation manned spacecraft. Sailing 220 miles above Bolivia, the shuttle's docking system disengaged its counterpart on the space station's forward port at 11:55 p.m. EDT (GMT-4) and the orbiter pulled away directly in front of the lab complex. "Houston and station, we have physical separation," an astronaut radioed as the two spacecraft separated. A few moments later, space station flight engineer Ronald Garan rang the ship's bell in the forward Harmony module and, following naval tradition, announced "Endeavour, departing. Fair winds and following seas, guys." "Thanks, Ron. We appreciate all the help,&q

CBS NEWS Coverage of Breaking Space News | 8a 5/29 Update: Shuttle crew returns to Endeavour, preps for undocking Sunday night.

By WILLIAM HARWOOD CBS News KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FL--The Endeavour astronauts wrapped up last-minute experiment transfers early Sunday, bid farewell to the crew of the International Space Station and moved back aboard the shuttle to prepare the ship for undocking Sunday night. Commander Mark Kelly thanked the three-man station crew for its hospitality, saying "we had a very successful mission." "We got the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer installed, which is really a remarkable thing for physics and for science," he said. "That sensor's already collecting massive amounts of data and we're looking forward to hearing what those discoveries are." Kelly, pilot Gregory H. Johnson, Michael Fincke, Gregory Chamitoff, Andrew Feustel and European Space Agency astronaut Roberto Vittori also delivered a pallet of spare parts, staged four spacewalks and helped service one of the station's oxygen generators and a carbon dioxide removal assemb

CBS NEWS Coverage of Breaking Space News: 1115a 5/28 Update: Astronauts wrap up CO2 scrubber repairs; prep for undocking Sunday

By WILLIAM HARWOOD CBS News KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FL--The shuttle Endeavour's crew helped out with repairs to one of the International Space Station's carbon dioxide scrubbers Saturday, packed up spacesuits and other EVA gear for return to Earth and transferred equipment and supplies to and from the lab complex as NASA's next-to-last shuttle mission moved into the home stretch of a 16-day mission. At mission control in Houston, flight controllers marvled at spectacular photos of Endeavour and the International Space Station that were captured during a spacewalk Friday by astronauts Michael Fincke and Gregory Chamitoff: http://ct.cbsnews.com/clicks?t=837172877-b1f5763a1bcc876b4d45ba4c9a0973ce-bf&brand=CBSNEWS&s=5 http://ct.cbsnews.com/clicks?t=837172878-b1f5763a1bcc876b4d45ba4c9a0973ce-bf&brand=CBSNEWS&s=5 Fincke and Chamitoff, both veterans of previous long-duration stays aboard the space station, spent the day Saturday replacing a CO2-a

CBS NEWS Coverage of Breaking Space News: 810a 5/27 Update: STS-34 spacewalk No. 4 ends; U.S. segment of station complete

By WILLIAM HARWOOD CBS News/Kennedy Space Center 08:10 AM EDT, 05/27/11 Update: STS-134 EVA No. 4 ends Astronauts Michael Fincke and Gregory Chamitoff attached the shuttle Endeavour's heat shield inspection boom to the International Space Station Friday, completing the U.S. segment of the orbital lab complex after 12 years of construction and more than 1,000 hours of spacewalk assembly time. Pausing to snap a final few pictures before returning to the Quest airlock, Chamitoff marked the milestone with a brief tribute to Endeavour, the shuttle and station programs and the thousands of engineers and technicians around the world who contributed to the high-flying project. "At this time, now that we're almost done here, I wanted to say a few words," he said. "This is the last flight of the space shuttle Endeavour and it's also the last spacewalk of shuttle crew members in station assembly. It's kind of fitting that Endeavour is here becaus

CBS NEWS Coverage of Breaking Space News: 9a 5/25 Update: Astronauts complete successful spacewalk

By WILLIAM HARWOOD CBS News/Kennedy Space Center 09:00 AM EDT, 05/25/11 Update: Spacewalk No. 3 ends Astronauts Michael Fincke and Andrew Feustel returned to the Quest airlock, closed the hatch and began repressurizing at 8:37 a.m. EDT (GMT-4), officially ending a six-hour and 54-minute spacewalk. The astronauts accomplished all of their primary objectives and other than a brief hiatus when Feustel reported uncomfortable eye irritation, there were no problems of any significance. This was the 158th spacewalk devoted to station assembly and maintenance since construction began in 1998, the seventh so far this year and the third for the Endeavour astronauts. Total station EVA time now stands at 995 hours and 13 minutes while the total for Endeavour's mission is 21 hours and 20 minutes. Feustel, completing his sixth spacewalk, has now logged 42 hours and 18 minutes of EVA time, moving him up to 14th on the list of most experience spacewalkers. Fincke, completing his

CBS NEWS Coverage of Breaking Space News: 2a 5/25 Update: Spacewalk No. 3 begins

By WILLIAM HARWOOD CBS News/Kennedy Space Center 02:00 AM EDT, 05/25/11 Update: STS-134 spacewalk No. 3 begins Astronauts Andrew Feustel and Michael Fincke, floating in the International Space Station's Quest airlock, switched their spacesuits to battery power at 1:43 a.m. EDT (GMT-4) to officially begin a planned six-and-a-half-hour spacewalk, the third of four planned by the shuttle Endeavour's crew. "It's great to be back outside," Fincke marveled a few minutes later. "The most beautiful planet in the universe." "Nice view, isn't it?" Feustel agreed. For identification, Feustel, call sign EV-1, is wearing a suit with red stripes around the legs while Fincke, EV-2, is wearing an unmarked suit. The primary goals of the spacewalk are to mount a power and data grapple fixture on the left side of the Russian Zarya module that can be used later as a base for the station's Canadian-built robot arm. The astronauts also p

CBS NEWS Coverage of Breaking Space News 06:00 PM EDT, 05/24/11 Update: NASA picks Orion-type capsule for deep space missions

By WILLIAM HARWOOD CBS News KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FL--A version of the Bush administration's Orion moon capsule, canceled by the Obama administration and then resurrected as a space station lifeboat, will be developed instead for use in future manned flights to deep space targets beyond Earth orbit, the agency announced Tuesday. Douglas Cooke, associate administrator of NASA's Exploration Systems Mission Directorate, told reporters the Orion concept, described by former NASA Administrator Mike Griffin as "Apollo on steroids," is the most capable spacecraft currently on the drawing board for meeting the Obama administration's "flexible path" approach to deep space exploration. "This is the Orion-based concept that was designed for deep space missions and had the appropriate accommodations and design requirements for that type of mission," he said. "We did look at alternatives in some of the systems designs we're seein