Advertizement

Showing posts with label . MarketWatch | Personal Finance Daily. Show all posts
Showing posts with label . MarketWatch | Personal Finance Daily. Show all posts

MarketWatch | Personal Finance Daily: Why your co-workers don’t like you



By MarketWatch
Don’t miss these top stories:
You share an open office, you work in a group setting and you have co-workers who talk a little too loud, have a messy desk and/or they microwave their leftover fish dinner nearby. Ever wonder if maybe you’re the person to talks a little too loudly when you’re on the phone? Could be. Ruth Mantell writes in her On The Job column today about how our co-workers judge us. Sometimes those small irritants can hurt productivity and build barriers between co-workers. Check out some advice for keeping things a little more pleasant at the office.
Also on MarketWatch today, visit our Trading Deck, where Nigam Arora outlines six important concepts to review before Apple announces its financial results on Tuesday.
Anne Stanley , Managing Editor, Personal Finance

Why your co-workers don’t like you

Your co-workers are judging you. Beneath a veneer of professional collegiality, they’re taking note of the mess on your desk, how loudly you chew, even your word choices.
Read more: Why your co-workers don’t like you.

2012 BMW 528i xDrive

BMW’s new 528i has its quirks — the aggravating shifter and the audio controls, to name two — but overall it’s still a luxurious, comfortable ride.
Read more: 2012 BMW 528i xDrive.

INVESTING

Six rules to heed ahead of Apple’s report

Ahead of Apple’s earnings report Tuesday, Nigam Arora writes on the Trading Deck about six rules to review before Apple reports, including how to imitate the smart money and pay attention to the whisper numbers.
Read more: Six rules to heed ahead of Apple’s report.

Hedge-fund ads are a game-changer

The one thing that might have allowed felon Bernie Madoff to run his phony hedge-fund business even longer in the face of an eroding stock market is successful advertising.
Read more: Hedge-fund ads are a game-changer. 
 
Page 1 Page 2

MarketWatch | Personal Finance Daily: Why Wall Street hates lazy portfolios


MarketWatch

Personal Finance Daily
MARCH 27, 2012

Tuesday's Personal Finance Stories

By MarketWatch



Don't miss these top stories:

So-called "lazy portfolios" give investors a superior alternative to risking their retirement savings on Wall Street, but Wall Street doesn't like lazy portfolios because brokers only get rich, or richer, when investors trade, Paul Farrell writes in his column.

Also on MarketWatch, Eva Rosenberg explains the complex tax rules on reporting income when family members are hired as caregivers.

Anne Stanley , managing editor, Personal Finance

You're invited: MarketWatch ETF event

If you're in the San Francisco Bay Area and you're interested in exchange-traded funds, we'd like to invited you to a free live event in April. Join us for an evening of cocktails and conversation about the risks and opportunities of trading ETFs. Our guest panelists will be Tom Lydon, president of Global Trends Investments and editor of ETFtrends.com; John Nyaradi, publisher of Wall Street Sector Selector; and Jim Wiandt, publisher and chief executive of IndexUniverse.com, Exchange-Traded Funds Report and Journal of Indexes. The event will be on the evening of Tuesday, April 17, in downtown San Francisco. To get more details and RSVP, send an email to MarketWatchevent@wsj.com by Tuesday, April 10.


6 reasons why Wall Street hates lazy portfolios

Lazy portfolios give investors a far superior alternative than gambling retirement savings in Wall's Street's casino. Simple solution: Just three to 11 no-load, low-cost index funds, and zero trading.
Read more: 6 reasons why Wall Street hates lazy portfolios.


Tax rules for paying family for in-home care

If you're paying your relatives, the tax implications are more complicated than they appear.
Read more: Tax rules for paying family for in-home care.


INVESTING

March Madness on Wall Street

Investors can do stupid things after their favorite sports teams lose, and with the Final Four playing this weekend, Mark Hulbert advises thinking twice before doing anything rash with your portfolio.
Read more: March Madness on Wall Street.


Liquidity flood lifts Mexico stocks

The Mexican stock market is now actually one of the closest of any major exchanges in the world to making a new all-time high — and quite deserving, Jon D. Markman writes in the Trading Deck. Check out the stocks that have caught his eye.
Read more: Liquidity flood lifts Mexico stocks.


Can Micron stay in Wall Street's good graces?

Given the 30% surge in Micron Technology Inc. (MU) this year, investors would never know the memory-chip market has been in a down cycle, Therese Poletti writes in Tech Tales.
Read more: Can Micron stay in Wall Street's good graces?


ECONOMY & POLITICS

Court takes up mandate to buy insurance

Central issue behind President Barack Obama's health-care law sparks a rigorous debate among Supreme Court justices.
Read more: Court takes up mandate to buy insurance.


U.S. consumer confidence dips in March

A gauge of consumers' level of confidence declines in March as they temper employment expectations, while views on the present situation rise to the highest level since 2008.
Read more: U.S. consumer confidence dips in March.


City-by-city breakdown of home prices

The following is a roundup of the city-by-city breakdown of the S&P/Case-Shiller 20-city composite released Tuesday.
Read more: City-by-city breakdown of home prices.


Springtime for U.S. housing

The long-hoped for bottom in the housing market appears to be at hand.
Read more: Springtime for U.S. housing.

MarketWatch | Personal Finance Daily: Investors, prepare for tax headache on cost basis


MarketWatch

Personal Finance Daily
JANUARY 19, 2012

Thursday's Personal Finance Stories

By MarketWatch



Don't miss these top stories:

Got stocks? Well, heads up: Investors who buy and sell stocks have a new tax form and new reporting rules to contend with this year when they do their tax returns — and some tax pros say the new rules could cause confusion. Andrea Coombes writes today in our TaxWatch column that thanks to the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008, starting in tax year 2011, if you sell a stock, your broker must report to the IRS the amount you paid for that stock — that is, your cost basis. Got aspirin?

Also in today's Personal Finance section on MarketWatch, Robert Powell takes a look at data ranking the best places in the world to retire abroad. Of course, best is very relative, but these havens offer some great scenery, warm weather, low cost of living and good real estate prices. Some of these places may be great opportunities for adventurous retirees. On the other hand, they may be great places to visit, even if you don't want to live there.

Anne Stanley , Managing Editor, Personal Finance

The world's top 10 retirement havens

These 10 countries offer retirees a low cost of living and cheap real estate, for starters. But you might be surprised just how many other retirement benefits you are afforded at these overseas destinations.
See the slide show: The world's top 10 retirement havens.


30-year fixed-rate mortgage hits record low

Interest rates on the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage hit another low this week, averaging 3.88% in Freddie Mac's survey of conforming mortgage rates.
Read more: 30-year fixed-rate mortgage hits record low.


Investors, prepare for tax headache on cost basis

Investors who buy and sell stocks have a new tax form and new reporting rules to contend with this year when they do their tax returns — and some tax pros say the new rules could cause confusion.
Read more: Investors, prepare for tax headache on cost basis.


Living the American dream — in Canada

The American dream is headed north — while it's been headed south in the U.S. The big headline in Canada's national daily this week was an eye-opener: "In Canada, unlike the U.S., the American Dream lives on." A prestigious new study had found that Canada's social mobility is now far greater than America's.
Read more: Living the American dream — in Canada.


INVESTING

Trading Deck: Cheap stocks to snap up now

Jeff Reeves writes today in the Trading Deck that not all cheap stocks are ugly investments that will whipsaw you around with volatility. Some low-price shares are indeed screaming bargains worth your cash.
Read more: Cheap stocks to snap up now.


Kodak files for bankruptcy protection

Iconic U.S. photo-equipment maker Kodak says the company and its U.S. subsidiaries filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy.
Read more: Kodak files for bankruptcy protection.


Peeling back the bank onions

Investors probably won't get excited about Morgan Stanley or Bank of America based on their fourth quarters, but the future? That's the bet to consider.
Read more: Peeling back the bank onions.


James Dines cites murmuration

Murmuration? The amazing James Dines has another Big Idea.
Read more: James Dines cites murmuration.


ECONOMY AND POLITICS

Philly Fed gauge up modestly in January

Philadelphia-area manufacturers reported a slight increase in activity in January, according to a closely followed index released Thursday that points to an economy moving but not racing along.
Read more: Philly Fed gauge up in January.


Jobless claims fall 50,000 to 352,000

New applications for unemployment benefits fell sharply last week, putting them at their lowest level in almost four years,
Read more: Jobless claims fall 50,000.


Consumer prices unchanged in December

Americans saw virtually no change in the prices they paid in December for a broad range of goods and services, according to the latest government data.
Read more: Consumer prices unchanged in December.


China consumers spend, even as growth eases

Retail-spending growth and the emergence of a new class of super consumers could be among the few bright spots as China's economy shifts towards an era of slower growth, analysts say.
Read more: China consumers spend, even as growth eases.

MarketWatch | Personal Finance Daily: Don't wait on college financial aid


MarketWatch

Personal Finance Daily
JANUARY 04, 2012

Don't wait on college financial aid

By MarketWatch



Don't miss these top stories:

At a time when college costs are rising and financial aid options may be dwindling, families need to get going now on the application process for aid and scholarships.

Also on MarketWatch today, columnist Matthew Lynn lays out the bull and bear arguments for gold, and then suggests investors cut to the heart of the question and ask what it would actually take to drive the price of gold down.

Anne Stanley , Managing Editor, Personal Finance

Time to get started on college financial aid

Financial aid may be tougher to get this year — at a time when college costs are rising and families need aid more than ever. A student's best chance to get more aid is to start the process early.
Read more: Time to get started on college financial aid.


Now from your bank: 0% ... and a toaster!

Who says banks aren't offering some perks? Our look at the latest crop of extras — and the catch.
Read more: Now from your bank: 0% ... and a toaster!


INVESTING

What would it take to burst gold's price?

Gold will tip over into bubble territory one day, Matthew Lynn writes. But it won't move into a bear market until central bankers start hammering down on inflation as they did in the early 1980s. And that moment is still some way off.
Read more: What would it take to burst gold's price?


Should you buy Wall Street's top stocks for 2012?

Last year, the highest-rated stocks on the Street actually did worse than a simple index fund. Again.
Read more: Should you buy Wall Street's top stocks for 2012?


How to play the January Effect

The original research on which the so-called January Effect is based shows that seasonal strength right after New Year's tends to concentrate among stocks of the very smallest companies.
Read more: How to play the January Effect.


ECONOMY & POLITICS

Europe bonds face key test

Less-than-thrilling uptake of German government debt on Wednesday put a drag on the euro, kicking off a major theme for the shared currency and other financial markets as Europe's debt crisis drags into 2012.
Read more: Europe bonds face key test.


Romney edges Santorum in Iowa caucuses

Mitt Romney edged out Rick Santorum after an ultra-tight race in the Iowa caucuses early Wednesday morning, beating his rival by just eight votes after a nail-biter of a night that kicked off the 2012 election season and began winnowing the GOP presidential field.
Read more: Romney edges Santorum in Iowa caucuses.


10 themes for 2012

The stories to watch in 2012, from Europe and real estate to the election and geopolitical strife.
Read more: 10 themes for 2012.

MarketWatch | Personal Finance Daily: 5 money moves one Buffett disciple is making now

MarketWatch
Personal Finance Daily
OCTOBER 26, 2011

To help unemployed friends or family, get specific

By MarketWatch



Don't miss these top stories:

If you have a friend or relative who's been hit by unemployment, it can be tough to know how to help. One thing jobless people don't need: vague offers of aid. If you are able to loan or give money, or help in other ways, be specific about how — and how much.

So say the experts quoted in Ruth Mantell's On the Job column today. Read her story, plus find out how Governor Rick Perry's flat-tax plan would affect you compared with Herman Cain's 9-9-9 plan.

Also, don't miss Robert Powell's Your Portfolio for a look at impending risks to your portfolio, and how to protect against them.

Andrea Coombes , Personal Finance editor

How to help a jobless friend or family member

With widespread and long-term unemployment, and underemployment, many people would like to help their struggling family and friends. Heed these tips to do the most good.
Read more: How to help a jobless friend or family member.


Perry flat tax vs. Cain 9-9-9: How they'd hit you

When it comes time to pay your tax bill, whose tax plan will cost you less, Herman Cain's or Rick Perry's? For most taxpayers, the answer is likely the plan offered up by Texas Governor Rick Perry on Tuesday.
Read more: Perry flat tax vs. Cain 9-9-9: How they'd hit you.


INVESTING

More risks ahead, so safeguard your portfolio now

There may not be enough worry dolls in the world right now. The European debt crisis isn't going away anytime soon and the U.S. economy is stuck in slow-growth mode. And there's more trouble brewing ahead. Robert Powell offers some ideas on how to protect your investments.
Read more: More risks ahead, so safeguard your portfolio now.


5 money moves one Buffett disciple is making now

Mutual-fund manager Whitney Tilson is convinced that some overlooked stocks in the U.S. market's most out-of-favor sectors are about to see daylight.
Read more: 5 money moves one Buffett disciple is making now.


Strange allies Huntsman, Vatican join bank critics

The backlash against Wall Street continues to grow without respect to political or religious boundaries, making strange bedfellows out of Vatican prelates, Mormon presidential candidates and hard-bitten central bankers.
Read more: Strange allies Huntsman, Vatican join bank critics.


ECONOMY & POLITICS

Supercommittee wrestles with budget cuts

Lawmakers on the congressional supercommittee charged with finding savings from the federal budget wrestle with cuts to defense, foreign aid and other programs, but show few major signs of agreement.
Read more: Supercommittee wrestles with budget cuts.


New U.S. home sales rise as prices tumble

Sales of new single-family U.S. homes rose in September as prices fell to the lowest level in nearly a year, but the housing market remains mired in a deep slump.
Read more: New U.S. homes sales rise as prices tumble.


2 non-negotiable demands of the 99%

The 99% movement is right. There are two big things we must absolutely do to create an economy that works for all of us: Eliminate too-big-to-fail banking and get money out of politics.
Read more: 2 non-negotiable demands of the 99%.


Wall Street neighbors should get used to noise

Despite the noise and sanitary problems, one neighbor says he understands why protesters are occupying Zuccotti Park near Wall Street.
Read more: Wall Street neighbors should get used to noise.


Durable-goods orders drop in September

Orders for long-lasting U.S. goods fall for the third month in four, mainly because of less demand for autos and commercial aircraft, government data show.
Read more: Durable-goods orders drop in September.


Greek debt standoff saps EU summit hopes

A fight over the size of the losses banks should take on Greek government debt cast further doubts on the ability of European leaders to meaningfully address the euro-zone debt crisis as they gather in Brussels for their second summit meeting in four days.
Read more: Greek debt standoff saps EU summit hopes.

Earn cash in focus groups, as mystery shopper: MarketWatch | Personal Finance Daily

MarketWatch
Personal Finance Daily
OCTOBER 04, 2011

Earn cash in focus groups, as mystery shopper

By MarketWatch



Don't miss these top stories:

Doesn't "mystery shopping" sound just a little too good to be true? I mean, really? Getting paid to do what we do every day — shop, spend our hard-earned money and then vent over customer service or the quality of what we bought?

Turns out companies really do want to hear your opinions and ideas, Jeanette Pavini writes in her Buyer Beware column. They'll pay you for it too. She talked to one man, an engineer, who was paid to participate in focus groups and that led to his company purchasing a resulting product — a product for which he was able to have input. On the lighter side, as Jeanette points out, it can just be fun to get to taste-test chocolate milk shakes.

Anne Stanley , managing editor, Personal Finance

Earn extra cash as a mystery shopper

These days, you don't have to be unemployed to be in need of extra cash. Some 8 million Americans pick up extra jobs and seek outside work, and many of us are just trying to trim expenses or increase our income. So how about getting paid for your opinions and ideas by moonlighting, as in a research focus group or as a mystery shopper?
Read more: Earn extra cash as a mystery shopper.


Disabled workers face barriers getting rehired

Employment for people with disabilities is down, and the number of people receiving disability benefits is increasing steadily. That's alarming, says author and Cornell University Prof. Richard Burkhauser, who sees a loosening in eligibility standards and a decline in incentives for companies to accommodate, rehabilitate and hire those with disabilities.
Read more: Disabled workers face barriers getting rehired.


INVESTING

Still hope for the fourth quarter

The stock market is supposed to go up on the first trading day of the quarter, right? Well, try telling that to Wall Street, where the stock market inaugurated the fourth quarter by closing decisively below its August lows. But, writes Mark Hulbert, the historical data point to better odds for a higher market in coming weeks.
Read more: Still hope for the fourth quarter.


How cheap are stocks now?

Maybe the overall market is still expensive, writes Brett Arends. Maybe it has further to fall. Who knows? Who cares? One thing is for certain: The latest slump has thrown out all sorts of values among big blue-chip names.
Read more: How cheap are stocks now?


The bear is at the door

With the domestic economy and European fiscal situation as uncertain as ever, speculators should get used to holding cash.
Read more: The bear is at the door.


ECONOMY & POLITICS

Bernanke says Twist equals half-point rate cut

The Fed's latest Operation Twist effort to boost the economy is not a "game-changer," but should help given that the economy is close to faltering, Federal Reserve Board Chairman Ben Bernanke says.
Read more: Bernanke says Twist equals half-point rate cut.


Occupy Wall Street is a tea party with brains

Occupy Wall Street is spreading to Main Street as more Americans understand the movement and recognize that this may be the nation's best chance to reform the process, writes David Weidner.
Read more: Occupy Wall Street is a tea party with brains.


Europe recession fears mount

A long-running debt crisis and further evidence of slowing growth momentum is stoking doubts about Europe's ability to avoid recession.
Read more: Europe recession fears mount.


China says U.S. yuan bill may spark trade war

China criticizes a U.S. Senate decision to move ahead with a bill designed to pressure Beijing on its currency policy, saying the move fosters distrust and could spark a trade war.
Read more: China says U.S. yuan bill may spark trade war.

MarketWatch Personal Finance Daily: Hurricane survival tips for city folk.

MarketWatch
Personal Finance Daily
AUGUST 26, 2011

Hurricane survival tips for city folk

By MarketWatch



Don't miss these top stories:

Hurricane Irene "is an extremely dangerous storm for an area that has no experience with hurricanes," meteorologist Jeff Masters, co-founder of Weather Underground, tells Jennifer Waters in her column today on 10 hurricane survival tips for New York and Washington, D.C. These tips may seem obvious to many people, but preparing for a natural disaster when you live in a heavily populated area or rely entirely on mass transit is serious business. And Friday morning, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said the mass-transit system across the New York City area will shut down at noon on Saturday. The shutdown will cover all of the transit services operated by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, including subways, buses and the nation's two largest commuter railroads. If you live in the mid-Atlantic region, get ready now if you haven't started.

Also in today's Personal Finance lineup, Dawn Lim writes about how identity thieves are targeting children's Social Security numbers and how they get away with it for years.

Finally, MarketWatch would like to extend a special invitation to our readers who are in Chicago and New York next month to attend one of our live panel discussions on ETFs and Retirement.

"Finding the Right Exchange-Traded Funds" is the topic of a MarketWatch panel discussion set for 9 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 21 in Chicago, hosted by columnist Chuck Jaffe. Join us for this breakfast event featuring the expertise and analysis of Michael Falk of Michael S. Falk Asset Consulting in Chicago; David Trainer, president of New Constructs Inc. in Nashville; and Scott Burns, director of ETF, Closed-End and Alternative Fund Research for Morningstar. They'll discuss how to evaluate your investment strategies and navigate the increasingly complex world of ETF products. If you'd like to join us for this free event, email your RSVP to wsjdnevent@dowjones.com by Monday, Sept. 19.

"How to Deal with Retirement's Biggest Risks" is the topic of a MarketWatch panel discussion set for 8 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 13 in New York, hosted by Robert Powell. Join us for this breakfast event featuring Dr. Kathryn McCabe Votava, president, GOODCARE.com; Joseph Coughlin, director, AgeLab; and Rick Miller, CFP, founder of Sensible Financial Planning. They'll discuss how to protect and grow your retirement savings, how to cope with long-term health-care costs, how to live the retirement lifestyle you seek and provide a road map that can help you manage those risks. If you'd like to join us for this free event, email your RSVP to MarketWatchevent@wsj.com by Friday, Sept. 9.

Anne Stanley , Managing Editor, Personal Finance

10 hurricane survival tips for New York, D.C.

As Hurricane Irene barrels toward New York and other large metropolitan areas such as Washington, D.C., Boston and Philadelphia, residents who have never faced this kind of natural disaster need to be prepared for the dangerous high winds and possible flooding that such a storm — even if not at hurricane strength — can bring.
Read more: 10 hurricane survival tips for New York, D,C.


Children's Social Security numbers easy hit

Children are more vulnerable to having their identities stolen but less likely to be detected as victims.
Read more: Children's Social Security numbers easy hit.


The 4 worst contracts in sports

In a week when a soccer player moved to Russia to get paid $30 million a year, here's a look at some of the most outlandish labor deals in U.S. sports.
Read more: The 4 worst contracts in sports.


TAXES

Tax deadline looms for people with money overseas

If you have a bank account or other assets stashed overseas that you've failed to report to the IRS, you're almost out of time to take part in an amnesty program to avoid steep tax penalties. But tax attorneys say that plenty of taxpayers are unaware they're on the wrong side of the law.
Read more: Tax deadline looms for people with money overseas.


REAL ESTATE

Condo owner on the brink of foreclosure

A homeowners association's function is, in part, to protect the value of the entire property for its members. So it absolutely, positively had the right to go after a developer accused of construction defects, Lew Sichelman writes.
Read more: Condo owner on the brink of foreclosure.


Charting home-price slump and new-house inventory

The week's economic indicators show, by state, how much home prices have fallen, and the smallest inventory of new builds on record. European business sentiment dips.
Read more: Charting home-price slump and new house inventory.


INVESTING

Debt will haunt the market for years to come

Subpar economic growth makes it harder for governments to solve their debt problems. So, the dark debt cloud may hang over the U.S., Japan and many European countries for years.
Read more: Debt will haunt the market for years to come.


Why charity should use an investing model

As the famine crisis looms in the Horn of Africa, natural disasters strike around the planet, and more people are pushed into harm's way, it's time to rethink the way we conduct charitable giving, says Thomas Kostigen.
Read more: Why charity should use an investing model.


ECONOMY & POLITICS

Bernanke: Fed will decide next month on new policy

Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke on Friday put off a lengthy discussion of the easing options available to the central bank until the next Federal Open Market Committee meeting late next month.
Read more: Fed will decide next month on new policy.


U.S. growth revised lower to 1% for second quarter

The U.S. economy grows slower in the second quarter than initially reported, mainly because of lower exports and less inventory restocking.
Read more: U.S, growth revised lower to 1% for second quarter.


America's unemployed can't wait, Bernanke says

We cannot afford to stand by idly while millions of Americans remain unemployed or underemployed for years and years, because it's hurting our growth potential, Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke says.
Read more: America's unemployed can't wait.


August consumer sentiment revised slightly higher

A reading of consumer sentiment for August was revised slightly higher but still shows a lack of faith in the U.S. economy.
Read more: August consumer sentiment revised slightly higher.

MarketWatch: Personal Finance Daily: Fed seeks exit from ‘new normal' economy


MarketWatch

Personal Finance Daily
AUGUST 16, 2011

Why stocks will save your retirement

By MarketWatch



Don't miss these top stories:

Despite signs of a bleaker outlook, the stock market is still about your only hope of overcoming the bite that inflation and taxes will take out of your retirement savings, Andrea Coombes writes today in her Ways and Means column. Now that a little bit of the dust has settled following last week's tremendous volatility, investors with an eye on retirement should be focusing on what this all means to their savings, particularly their 401(k) plans. And, focus on what you can control, Andrea writes: Mutual fund expenses, diversification and rebalancing your portfolio.

Anne Stanley , Managing Editor, Personal Finance

Why stocks will save your retirement

After suffering through the "lost decade" for stocks, investors were taken on a roller-coaster ride in recent weeks — and the future looks to hold more of the same: a highly volatile stock market and lower annual average returns. Andrea Coombes looks at what this means for your 401(k).
Read more: Why stocks will save your retirement.


Lessons on investing from America's richest family

Given the wrenching swings of the past two weeks, many of us may wish we could be so sanguine about our own losses. But even without a few extra billion dollars in the bank, there are useful lessons to be gleaned from the way the Waltons and other ultrarich families cope with investments and market volatility.
Read more: Lessons on investing from America's richest family.


Is your wallet too fat?

A surprising number of Americans lug around wallets the size of family pets. Here's why they can drag you down — and what to do about it.
Read more: Is your wallet too fat?


INVESTING

The bull market isn't back yet

It is important to watch breadth, volume and leadership to determine the chances of a nascent advance making it to the big-time, writes Kevin Marder.
Read more: The bull market isn't back yet.


‘Death cross' springing up everywhere

All three major U.S. indexes now are in death-cross mode, signaling the increased possibility of a new bear market in U.S. equities.
Read more: ‘Death cross' springing up everywhere.


Microsoft might like Google's Motorola deal

Depending on how Google's purchase of Motorola Mobility shakes out, the deal could ultimately help boost the market for Windows Phone mobile devices
Read more: Microsoft might like Google's Motorola deal.


ECONOMY AND POLITICS

Industrial output jumps in July on auto strength

Industrial production advanced 0.9% in July. Much of the gain came from utilities and autos but there were gains outside of these two sectors. Capacity utilization rose to the highest level in almost three years.
Read more: Industrial output jumps in July on auto strength.


Idle resources keeping inflationary pressures low

We do have some inflation, of course, but it's not being fueled by rising American wages, or supply constraints at American factories, writes Rex Nutting.
Read more: Idle resources keeping inflationary pressures low.


Fitch reaffirms AAA rating on U.S.

Fitch stands by AAA rating and calls the U.S. outlook stable — but warns that Congress must make good on $1.2 trillion deficit-cutting plan.
Read more: Fitch reaffirms AAA rating on U.S.


Housing starts slip 1.5% in July, U.S. data show

There were 1.5% fewer housing starts in July compared to June, according to government data, highlighting persistently slack demand for new homes. June figures for starts and building permits are both revised lower.
Read more: Housing starts slip 1.5% in July, U.S. data show.


German growth nearly grinds to a halt

Germany's economic growth nearly ground to a halt in the second quarter, highlighting fears that the so-called Wirtschaftswunder in Europe's largest economy may be coming to an end.
Read more: German growth nearly grinds to a halt.


Hong Kong's slump signals global trouble: analysts

Hong Kong is suffering an economic chill that could soon go global, according to analysts who say the territory is showing omens of a dire economic outlook.
Read more: Hong Kong's slump signals global trouble.


Fed seeks exit from ‘new normal' economy

By committing to two years before short-term rates rise, the Fed is pushing harder on its own stimulus pedal to revive the weak economy, writes columnist Barry Wood.
Read more: Fed seeks exit from ‘new normal' economy.


Some economic lessons from history

If the U.S. does lapse into a double-dip recession, it will be because policy makers are ignoring the lessons they should have learned from mistakes that were made in the past, writes Irwin Kellner.
Read more: Some economic lessons from history.

Posts Title