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Mar 19, 2018

The New York Times | Opinion Today: How to respond to a Trump Twitter tantrum. March 19, 2018




  The New York Times

Monday, March 19, 2018

David Leonhardt

David Leonhardt

Op-Ed Columnist
Several congressional Republicans had the right response to President Trump’s lie-laden tantrum about Robert Mueller yesterday.
Firing Mueller, Senator Lindsey Graham said, “would be the beginning of the end of his presidency.” Senator Jeff Flake called it “a massive red line.” Paul Ryan, the speaker of the House, was weaker, letting his spokeswoman say, “Mr. Mueller and his team should be able to do their job” — but that’s still less deferential to Trump than Ryan normally is.
And yet The Atlantic’s David Frum notes that this weekend still featured a worrisome example of Congress folding in the face of a Trump assault on the rule of law: the firing of Andrew McCabe, the F.B.I. deputy director. “All this matters even more urgently when you consider the McCabe firing as a road-test for Trump’s method in an impending showdown with Robert Mueller,” Frum writes.
Quinta Jurecic and Benjamin Wittes of Lawfare also help explain the McCabe firing.
*
By now, you’ve probably heard the claim that Americans have grown skeptical of education: Student debt is out of control, a college degree doesn’t guarantee a good job, and on and on.
Don’t believe these claims. Yes, many people criticize our education system — and many of those criticisms are legitimate. But the vast majority of Americans understand how important education is, and they very much want their children to get a good education, including college.
My column this morning lays out the evidence of real attitudes about education, including a story from the recent Alabama Senate race and a new study by the think tank Demos. Thanks to Morning Consult, a research firm, I was also able to conduct a poll for the column. It asked people what level of education they wanted their kids to receive — high school, community college or four-year college.
The results show that all the talk of skepticism is badly exaggerated. And the enormous popularity of education creates an opportunity for anyone running for office this year. Voters are ready to hear ideas about better access to a strong, affordable education.
I hope you’ll read the column.
*
The Times and The Observer of London both had scoops this weekend about the misuse of Facebook data by Cambridge Analytica, a firm employed by the Trump campaign. Wired’s Issie Lapowsky argues that the episode is the latest sign that Facebook needs to change: “Facebook offers unprecedented data to its paying clients, but has next to no controls in place to ensure that data will be handled properly.”
The full Opinion report from The Times follows.
Op-Ed Columnist
A Winning Political Issue Hiding in Plain Sight
By DAVID LEONHARDT
An issue that people care about and doesn’t need to be partisan.
Op-Ed Columnist
Trump: The Un-American President
By CHARLES M. BLOW
He has damaged the American brand.
Editorial
The Student Loan Industry Finds Friends in Washington
By THE EDITORIAL BOARD
The Trump administration seems more interested in appeasing student loan companies than helping those who are in debt.
Contributing Op-Ed Writer
Nashville Demolition Blues
By MARGARET RENKL
This city’s building boom has reached the place where my family and friends wove a life.
Op-Ed Contributor
Why I Didn’t Join My School’s Walkout
By DAKOTA HANCHETT
I am a high school junior, and I shoot guns and hunt. Many of the kids protesting guns right now don’t seem to know that much about them.




Op-Ed Contributor
Israel’s Self-Inflicted Wounds
By RONALD S. LAUDER
Why I fear for the nation I love.
Op-Ed Contributor
The Dirty Secret of American Nuclear Arms in Korea
By WALTER PINCUS
North Korea may be unreliable, but it was America that broke with the Korean armistice by introducing nuclear weapons into South Korea in 1958.
Op-Ed Contributor
The U.S. Needs to Talk to the Taliban in Afghanistan
By BORHAN OSMAN
Washington shies away from the idea of direct talks, but the Taliban see the United States as the decisive actor on the battlefield.
Op-Ed Contributor
Iranians Do New Year’s Better
By MAZ JOBRANI
In learning to appreciate my Iranian background, I started to see the beauty of Nowruz.
The Stone
How to Talk About Abortion
By LAURIE SHRAGE
Removing arguments of individual morality from the equation is the best way to find consensus and determine public policy.
Editorial
Don’t Let Parole Become a Meaningless Concept
By THE EDITORIAL BOARD
Though his crime was heinous, Herman Bell’s sentence of 25 years to life entitled him to the possibility of release from prison.
Editorial
Investigate Killings in the Philippines
By THE EDITORIAL BOARD
President Rodrigo Duterte’s move to pull the country out of the International Criminal Court should not impede a probe into deaths there.
Sunday Review
Trump, Flush With Power
By MAUREEN DOWD
The president wants to bring the Fox cast into the White House, fully merging with the source of his ideas, tweets and gratification.
Sunday Review
Stop Apologizing for Being Elite
By SUSAN JACOBY
The energy that elites spend being ashamed of their advantages would be better spent sharing the fruits of those advantages.
Sunday Review
Anti-Semitism Is Rising. Why Aren’t American Jews Speaking Up?
By JONATHAN WEISMAN
The leaders of major Jewish organizations have been focused on Israel, not the brewing storm in our own country.
Sunday Review
The Poison Putin Spreads
By STEVEN LEE MYERS
The long-serving Russian leader, who is about to be re-elected for a six-year term, has become a model for the modern autocrat.