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Mar 2, 2018

NYT MAGAZINE: CAN VENEZUELA BE SAVED? Friday March 2, 2018.

The New York Times 

 
Leopoldo López
Leopoldo López Diana López for The New York Times
By WIL S. HYLTON
As a nation unwinds, Leopoldo López, the opposition’s most prominent leader, sits under house arrest and contemplates what might still be possible.
 
By BRUCE FALCONER
Inside the mysterious art — and big business — of color forecasting.
John Kelly, the White House chief of staff, observing a meeting between President Trump and members of Congress.
Tom Brenner for The New York Times
By MATT FLEGENHEIMER
Last year, Democrats and Republicans alike agreed that if anyone could bring order to the Trump administration, it was the retired four-star Marine general. Were they wrong?
Do I Have to Tell My Father About My #MeToo Experience?
By KWAME ANTHONY APPIAH
The magazine’s Ethicist columnist on whether to disclose a history of sexual assault to family members and more.
A Painful Bruise Wouldn’t Heal. It Took Several Hospital Visits to Discover Why.
By LISA SANDERS, M.D.
It started when a paint can fell on the patient’s foot. But it got worse and worse from there.
Over the past year, As Venezuela descended into an unprecedented crisis — the world’s highest rate of inflation, extreme shortages of food and medicine, constant electrical blackouts, thousands of children dying of malnutrition, rampant crime in every province, looting and rioting in the streets — its opposition leader remained silent, until now. In this week’s cover story, Leopoldo López, the most prominent political prisoner in Latin America, who has been forbidden to speak with the press under the terms of his imprisonment, talks with Wil S. Hylton about what, if anything, could lift his country out of turmoil. ‘‘I think our responsibility is to move beyond the personal resentment,’’ López says. ‘‘Four years in prison have given me the possibility of seeing things a different way, of putting rage in its perspective.’’
Elsewhere in the magazine, Bruce Falconer writes about the mysterious art, and big business, of color forecasting. Matt Flegenheimer writes about John Kelly — the man Democrats and Republicans alike thought could bring order to the Trump administration — if he could hang on. And John Herrman writes about those vexing red dots, commonly seen at the corners of app icons, and how they took over your life.
Also, we’re redesigning our newsletter. We want to hear what you’d like the see. Email us at magazine@nytimes.com with suggestions.
Happy reading,
Jake Silverstein
Editor in Chief