Jan 29, 2017

Notification to Our Readers | Fom the Desk of Fernando Guzmán Cavero - January 29, 201.

Dear Readers::

Since tomorrow, and almost the whole week, our finanncial information news, will not be on line in our average hourly time-posting of news. This happens, due to the fact that we have to stop,for  once and hopefully forever, with the implicit consent agreement of fake regulators in Perú with  the firms, that they have to supervise in accordance with the Law
 Consequently some days we might not be with you, we will do our best to stay at least with the summary fo what we considered the most relevant news of the day, but we cannot give our word in this respect.


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We apologize for any inconveniece this issue could have touched your expectations.


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NYT | Selected News: On January 28 Protest Grows "Out of Nowhere" at Kennedy Airport After Iraquis Are Detained




 nytimes.com

Protest Grows ‘Out of Nowhere’ at Kennedy Airport After Iraqis Are Detained

Eli Rosenberg

Protests at J.F.K. Against Immigration Ban

Peaceful demonstrations began Saturday afternoon at Kennedy International Airport in Queens, where nearly a dozen travelers had been detained, an airport official said.
By DAPHNE RUSTOW and AINARA TIEFENTHÄLER on January 28, 2017. Photo by Victor J. Blue for The New York Times. Watch in Times Video »
It began in the morning, with a small crowd chanting and holding cardboard signs outside Kennedy International Airport, upset by the news that two Iraqi refugees had been detained inside because of President Trump’s executive order.
By the end of the day, the scattershot group had swelled to an enormous crowd.
They filled the sidewalks outside the terminal and packed three stories of a parking garage across the street, a mass of people driven by emotion to this far-flung corner of the city, singing, chanting and unfurling banners.
This was the most public expression of the intense reaction generated across the country by Mr. Trump’s polarizing decision. While those in some areas of the country were cheered by the executive order, the reaction was markedly different for many in New York. References to the Statue of Liberty and its famous inscription became a rallying cry.
Similar protests erupted at airports around the country.
Word of the protest at Kennedy first filtered out on social media from the immigrant-advocacy groups Make the Road New York and the New York Immigration Coalition. It seemed like it might stay small.
But the drama seemed to rise throughout the day.
There was the release of Hameed Khalid Darweesh, one of the two Iraqi refugees who had been detained, who said the United States was the greatest country in the world.
Hameed Khalid Darweesh, center, after being released from detention at Kennedy Airport on Saturday. Victor J. Blue for The New York Times
“This is the humanity, this is the soul of America,” he said, surrounded by reporters and a handful of protesters holding supportive signs. “This is what pushed me to move, leave my country and come here.”
Just past 3 p.m., a man with a social media megaphone gave it a blow. “Everybody in NYC area — head to JFK Terminal 4 NOW!” Michael Moore said on Twitter. “Big anti-Trump protest forming out of nowhere!”
People were pouring in. Photos traveled far and wide on social media and on cable networks like CNN, which reported live from the protest.
By sundown, the crowd had grown into the hundreds or more, spreading along the parking apron and onto the three floors of the parking deck overlooking the terminal. They shouted downward in unison with the crowd.
Passengers with baggage-laden carts squeezed in and around knots of people as they headed to and from the terminal. One group of four people, apparently with a flight to catch, simply abandoned their cart in the parking lot and rolled their bags to the unoccupied end of the terminal.
Cabdrivers joined in, with their union, the New York Taxi Workers Alliance, calling for an hourlong work stoppage for drivers serving the airport during the height of the protest.
There were moments of tension.
In the evening, people complained on social media that they were being prevented from boarding the AirTrain, the link from the subway to the airport. Photos circulated of police officers standing in front of the turnstiles.
Alison Brockhouse, 33, said she had arrived around 7 p.m. and had been told that the police were letting only people with airplane tickets onto the public transportation system. “I was a little incredulous at first,” she said. “I’ve never really seen anything like this.”
The Port Authority wrote in a post on Twitter, “AirTrain JFK controls in place for public safety, due to crowding conditions.”
But Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo, a Democrat, stepped in amid a rising drumbeat of anger at an AirTrain station.
“I have ordered the Port Authority to reverse its decision regarding the JFK AirTrain,” Mr. Cuomo said in a news release put out shortly after 8 p.m. “The people of New York will have their voices heard.”
Still, the minutes ticked by at the AirTrain station, as the police refused to let people through even after the announcement, Ms. Brockhouse said. There was a moment where it was not clear if the large crowd would be able to attend the protest. But about 15 minutes later, the police stepped aside, and the crowd was let past.

WSJ | Forex Closing on January 27, 2017

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CMI | Metals Spot Prices Closing on January 27, 2017

Spot Prices as of traditional New York closing times

Friday, January 27, 2017



 

Wall Street at Close Report on January 27, 2017: Dow Ends Landmark Week With A Whimper

marketwatch.com
 
Sue Chang, Anora Mahmudova
 
U.S. stocks closed mostly lower on Friday after a monumental week that pushed the Dow Jones Industrial Average above 20,000 for the first time as investors weighed disappointing fourth-quarter data on domestic economic growth and a spate of earnings.

European Markets at Close Report on January 27, 2017: European Stocks Close Lower as Banks Rally Loses Steam

marketwatch.com
 
Carla Mozee, Sara Sjolin
European stocks fell from a 13-year high on Friday, closing in negative territory as UBS Group PLC lead banking shares lower after a financial update.

Jan 27, 2017

BEA News Release - January 27, 2017: Real gross domestic product (GDP) increased at an annual rate of 1.9 percent in the fourth quarter of 2016 (table 1), according to the "advance" estimate released by the Bureau of Economic Analysis, Q3 +3.5%.


The U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) has issued the following news release today:


Real gross domestic product (GDP) increased at an annual rate of 1.9 percent in the fourth quarter of 2016 (table 1), according to the "advance" estimate released by the Bureau of Economic Analysis. In the third quarter, real GDP increased 3.5 percent.

The full text of the release on BEA's Web site can be found at www.bea.gov/newsreleases/national/gdp/gdpnewsrelease.htm


The End of The Structural Reform | Bloomberg View - January 27, 2017

bloomberg.com
 
Bloomberg View
 
‘Reform’ Isn’t the Answer to Everything
Don’t look to the ghost of Reagan to solve today’s economic problems — structural reforms are less popular, and less likely to be effective, than ever before. Satyajit Das says the most important thing now is for policymakers to shore up weak demand.

U.S. stock Market Future Indications- January 27, 2017: Dow Poised to Break Winning Run, With GDP Data on the Agenda

marketwatch.com
 
Sara Sjolin
 
After rising for three straight days, the Dow Jones Industrial Average on Friday was poised for a pullback, with fourth-quarter GDP data and a spate of earnings, including those from Dow component Chevron, among the factors investors need to consider.

Asian Markets at Close Report on January 27, 2017: Asian Markets Tick Higher ahead of Lunar New Year's Holida

marketwatch.com
 
Ese Erheriene 
 
Investors’ renewed enthusiasm for risk continued into Asia-Pacific trading on Friday morning, as equities continued to build on recent gains and the dollar crept upward, breaching 115 yen for the first time this week.

WSJ | Forex Closing on January 26, 2017

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WSJ | Biggest Gainers Closing on January 26, 2017

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Jan 26, 2017

Trump Endorses Plan for 20% Tax on All Imports. NYT | Politics - January 26, 2017

nytimes.com
 
Michael D. Shear

Wall Street at Close Report on January 26, 2017: U.S. Stocks Closed Mixed After Notching New all-Time Intraday Highs; Earnings in Focus

cnbc.com
 
Fred Imbert


U.S. equities closed mixed on Thursday after hitting new record highs, as investors digested several key earnings reports.

CMI | Metals Spot Prices Closing ob January 26, 2017.

Spot Prices as of traditional New York closing times

Thursday, January 26, 2017



European Markets at Close Report on January 26, 2017: Europe Shares Close Higher; Hits 1-Year High After Dow Breaks 20, 000; Actelion Surges Up 19

cnbc.com
 
Silvia Amaro, Sam Meredith

The Guardian | U.S. Brifing: Trump Torture Works - January 26, 2017

theguardian.com
 
Mazin Sidahmed

‘We have to fight fire with fire’

U.S. Stock Market Future Indications on January 26, 2017: U.S. stocks Future Rise Amid Earnings Deluge

cnbc.com
 
Anmar Frangoul
Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange in New York City.
Getty Images
Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange in New York City.

Bloomberg View: Britain's Health Service Needs a Cash Transfusion - January 26, 2017:

bloomberg.com
 
The Editors
 
Britain’s impending withdrawal from the European Union has drawn attention away from a different kind of crisis -- the one afflicting its National Health Service. Either the NHS will need a lot more investment, or Britons will have to prepare for a seriously impaired health-care system.

Asian Markets at Close Report on January 26, 2017: Asian Shares Advance After Dow Hits 20,000

cnbc.com
 
Aza Wee Sile
Getty Images
Japanese and Hong Kong shares were up more than 1 percent on Thursday, taking their cues from the Dow Jones industrial average shooting past 20,000 after a volley of executive orders by President Donald Trump.

WSJ | Forex Closing on January 25, 2017

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Jan 25, 2017

Wall Street at Close Report on January 25, 2017: Dow Closes Above 20,000 for the First Time as Trump Ordrs Send Stocks Flying

cnbc.com
 
Fred Imbert
 
U.S. equities closed at all-time highs on Wednesday after a series of executive orders from President Donald Trump increased bullish sentiment on Wall Street, while financials outperformed.

CMI | Metals Spot Prices Closing on January 25, 2017

Spot Prices as of traditional New York closing times

Wednesday, January 25, 2017



Welcome to dystopia – George Orwell Experts on Donald Trump: The Guardian | Opinion | U.S. Politics | The Panel - January 25, 2017

theguardian.com
 
Tim Crook

Jean Seaton: The seeds were sown during the George W Bush era


Jean Seaton.
Reading George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four again, now, hurts. And I’m not the only one to be revisiting it: sales of the book have soared in the past week. What you had previously thought you read at a cool, intellectual distance (a great book about “over there”, somewhere in the past or future) now feels intimate, bitter and shocking. Orwell is writing of now when he writes, “Every year fewer and fewer words, and the range of consciousness always a little smaller.”
Of course, we all have to keep our heads (especially we have to keep our heads). The lies about the crowd size at Donald Trump’s inauguration by the hapless White House spokesman Sean Spicer at his first briefing were not earth-shattering. But any lie from this podium is deeply unsettling. Any hopes that Trump or his team were, underneath it all, “normal” rightwingers, have dissipated.
The post-truth era certainly shares aspects of the dystopian world of Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four. Michael Gove’s infamous comment that Britain has had enough of experts is just one step away from 2+2 = 5. In the interrogation scene in 1984 this is the most appalling moment: before now we read it as a ludicrous indictment of the rejection of reality (surely, we conclude, the party itself must know that 2+2 = 4; science, machines all depend on it). In Nineteen Eighty-Four, the elite, personified by O’Brien, foster and control this willingness to believe one thing one day, and one thing another. Now, it seems, the party itself may believe the lie. As Orwell writes: “Science, in the old sense, had almost ceased to exist. In Newspeak there is no word for science.”

Then there is privacy – Orwell puts the diary and the private self at the heart of his writing. In 1984, keeping a diary is Winston’s first act of transgression. Orwell knew that authoritarian regimes want the heart and soul of people. His two-way telescreens predict social media. And we have, perhaps unwittingly, wandered into a world where feelings have never been more easily swayed: Trump summons them up personally and directly. In the book, Winston is suddenly struck that his mother’s death, “had been tragic and sorrowful in a way that was no longer possible … She had sacrificed herself to a conception of loyalty that was private and unalterable.” It could no longer happen because “there were fear, hatred and pain but no dignity of emotion, no deep or complex sorrows”.
But this new world has been a while coming. Trump adviser Kellyanne Conway’s “alternative facts” were foreshadowed by the George W Bush adviser who said in 2002 that the new American empire was “creating [its] own reality”. As in the 1930s, war has been at the heart of the corrosion of trust in politicians. The lies over Iraq and the quagmire of Afghanistan were followed by the financial crash of 2008, and bankers’ bonuses – making people far more willing to disbelieve the remote metropolitan media and be drawn to the false dawn promised by Trump.
Yet these are the obvious big lies. There has been a long drift away from rational beliefs that we have watched too passively. Mistrust in facts was sown by the insistence on creationism and climate change denial by politicians and in many US churches. But it’s not just America – in India, government officials say that cows don’t contribute to global warming because they breathe out oxygen. Even universities with their “no platforms” have added yeast to the brew.
Trump is not O’Brien. He is more like a cut-price version of Big Brother himself. Instead of the elite of Nineteen Eighty-Four, who keep Big Brother’s identity a mystery while they keep total control, this Big Brother, with his direct Twitter relationship with his followers, is fully on show. And as Orwell foresaw, his slogan could be “Ignorance is strength”.

Tim Crook: Trump takes doublethink to a new extreme


Donald Trump and his staff
‘I imagine Trump would amuse and horrify him at the same time.’ Photograph: UPI / Barcroft Images
Tim Crook
Trump’s first few days of office have been such an explosion of propagandist grapeshot, it’s little wonder many people have been reaching for copies of Nineteen Eighty-Four. His seminal essay Politics and the English Language should also go on the emergency reading list.
Orwell said political language can be “designed to make lies sound truthful and murder respectable, and to give an appearance of solidity to pure wind”. Washington Post media columnist Margaret Sullivan wrote that this week’s reference by Trump spokesperson Kellyanne Conway to “alternative facts” means we have “come full Orwell”. But have we?
Orwell certainly would have appreciated how the eruption of populist demagoguery and the Brexit and Trump triumphs have generated a “post-truth” anxiety in the mainstream media. Journalism’s key institutions sense a crisis. Public sphere news and current affairs interpretation is supposed to represent reality to the audience. Orwell said that “realism” used to be called dishonesty, and wrote in his account of the Spanish civil war, Homage to Catalonia, that bombs are impartial because they killed the man they were thrown at, and the man who threw them.

Orwell never set foot in America. But he was an avid critic of its literature and politics, and would have conceded that his attitude to the USA had elements of the very doublethink he dramatised in Nineteen Eighty-Four. While he resented how post-second world war US economic dominance frustrated the realisation of the British socialist dream, he chose the American side against the Soviet Union in the cold war.
After his death, his crystal-pane deconstruction of the corruption of revolution and the totalitarian game were adopted as propagandist weapons by the CIA against the Soviet Union. The early transfer of Animal Farm and Nineteen Eighty-Four to film was even financed by the CIA with the endings changed.
But Trump takes doublethink to a new extreme, and if Orwell were alive today, I imagine Trump would amuse and horrify him at the same time. The key message in Nineteen Eighty-Four is that the purpose of propaganda is to narrow and limit human consciousness, confuse human conscience, and control and narrow the range of thinking. As all students of Orwellian literature will recall, Squealer, the propagandist porker in Animal Farm, can “turn black into white” and is expert in “new belief”.
If any Orwellian unmasking of Trump rhetoric begins to hurt him, I imagine the day will come when the president gestures with his characteristic shape-and-pinch hand movement and bellows, “Fake Orwell”.

DJ Taylor: The parallels are impossible to deny


DJ Taylor
It is just possible to feel a shred of sympathy with Kellyanne Conway. Stung by incontrovertible evidence that more people were keener on complaining about her boss than supporting him, took refuge in a form of words that would have been hilarious were they not at the same time horribly sinister. But it would be wrong to judge her too harshly for her defence of Sean Spicer’s “alternative facts”. She is a PR, operating in a world where all values are expedient.
It’s useless to pretend that this isn’t all sharply reminiscent of the world of Nineteen Eighty-Four (by coincidence, Orwell died 67 years ago to the day that the anti-Trumpites marched on Washington). Winston Smith, sitting in his cubby-hole at the Ministry of Truth falsifying back-numbers of the Times in accordance with the latest revisionist diktats from on high, deals in “alternative facts”, or rather with deliberate untruths that eventually become facts merely because the former versions of them are no longer around to disturb.
The same goes for the periodic “readjustments” (ie reductions) of the amount of rationed goods available to the cowed citizenry of Orwell’s Oceania. There, the impact of cuts can always be reduced by altering the words of the previous announcement.
Inevitably, much of this manipulation can be traced back to Orwell’s monitoring of the concealments and evasions of the second world war – the Katyn massacre, for example, when thousands of Poles were murdered by Soviet secret police and which some Russian history books omit altogether – but its roots lie in his experience of fighting against Franco in the Spanish civil war. It was here, he later wrote, that he first read newspaper accounts of battles that had not taken place and heard reports of soldiers charged with cowardice whom he knew had fought bravely.

None of which should obscure the fact that this defender of objective truth was also a propagandist (working for the BBC’s Eastern Service in the early 1940s, Orwell once complained that the fault of the government’s war-time propaganda was that it needed to do its job more effectively.) At the same time, he was confident that there were lines which neither right nor left in western democracies would cross. The Daily Telegraph, for instance, features near the top of a list he once compiled of newspapers which were reliable. He might not have agreed with the way it interpreted the news, but he believed the information it contained was accurate.
As for what Orwell might have thought of President Trump and his entourage, he would probably have drawn attention to the steady war of attrition fought by various political and corporate oligarchies over the past 50 years against the idea that it can be said that a particular event definitely happened, whether you approve of it or not. He might have pointed out, too, that these obfuscations are not merely a byproduct of total war – who could really complain about the RAF rigging the numbers of Nazi planes brought down in the Battle of Britain? – but part and parcel of the way in which a certain kind of contemporary autocrat and reality-twister faces up to the world.
Meanwhile, it is worth asking what the average person is supposed to do in a landscape where the leader of what used to be called the free world has such a wanton disregard for one of the principal tools of freedom. Even Big Brother, after all, brought a certain amount of guile to pretending what he said was true.

European Markets at Close Report on January 25, 2017: European Markets Close Higher on Earnings; Logitech Up 15%; Deutshe Bank Rises 5%

cnbc.com
 
Silvia Amaro, Sam Meredith
 
European markets closed higher on Wednesday as investors took cues from overseas markets and digested fresh earnings reports.

Putin's Sanctioned Ally May Win Quarter of Russian Gold Reserves | Bloomberg News - January 25, 2017

bloomberg.com
 
@YFEDORN More stories by Yuliya Fedorinova
 
 
  • More than 100 auto factories closed under last two presidents
  • Profitable carmakers now being lured with eased rules, taxes

The Guardian | U.S. Briefing: Trump: "We Will Build the Wall" | The Daily Briefing

theguardian.com
 
Mazin Sidahmed

Trump to start work on the wall

U.S. Stock Market Future Indications Update on January 25, 2017: Dow Futures Rise 100 Points, Puttin 20,000 in Sight as Trump Rally Reignites

cnbc.com
 
Sam Meredith
 
U.S. stock index futures pointed to a higher open on Wednesday as traders eyed a deluge of earnings reports, while a post-election rally reignited.

Bloomberg Markets: Five Things You Need to Know to Start Your Day - January 25, 2017

bloomberg.com
 
More stories by Lorcan Roche Kelly
Get caught up on what's moving markets.

U.S. Stock Market Future Indications - January 25, 2017: Dow Stays on Path to 20,000 Milestone Ahead of Key Earnings

marketwatch.com
 
Sara Sjolin
 
U.S. stocks were set for another upbeat trading day on Wednesday, with the Dow Jones Industrial Average looking to open within arms reach of the psychologically-important 20,000 level.

Asian Markets at Close Report on January 25, 2017: Japan's Nikkei Jumps as Asian Stocks Tick Upward


 
Kenan Machado 
Asian stocks rose Wednesday amid improved risk sentiment from both regional economic data and overnight gains in the U.S. for both stocks and the dollar.

Bloomberg View | Share the View - January 25, 2017: Trumo Starts Making China Great Again

bloomberg.com
 
Bloomberg View
 
A Gift for China in Trump’s First Week

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