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Jan 26, 2015

U.S. Stock Market Future Indications - January 26, 2015: U.S. stocks: Futures slide as Greece vote triggers risk aversion | MarketWatch

U.S. stocks: Futures slide as Greece vote triggers risk aversion

By


MARKETS REPORTER

And 



ASIA EDITOR
MADRID (MarketWatch) — U.S. stock futures pointed to a weaker open for Wall Street on Monday after a win by Greek opposition party Syriza in that country’s general election triggered a move out of perceived riskier assets, such as stocks
Futures for the Dow Jones Industrial Average DJH5, -0.25%  fell 97 points, or 0.6%, to 17,491, while those for the S&P 500 SPH5, -0.27%  slipped 9.2 points, or 0.5%, to 2,034.70. Futures for the Nasdaq 100 index NDH5, -0.19%  fell 13.5 points, or 0.3%, to 4,253.50.
The futures could still make large moves from their current levels, especially after the European markets open, but if the losses hold then U.S. shares would extend their retreat from a mostly down session Friday, when the Dow industrialsDJIA, -0.79%  ended 0.8% weaker, while the S&P 500 SPX, -0.55%   fell 0.5%, but the Nasdaq Composite COMP, +0.16%  edged up 0.2%.
News that Greek opposition party Syriza had won a general election there, raising the possibility that Greece could lose its international assistance or even leave the eurozone, appeared to weigh on the U.S. futures.
Uncertainty arising for the Greek results had a muted effect on Asia markets, but European stock futures were pointing to a weaker open for those markets. Meanwhile, the euro hit fresh lows of more than a decade late Sunday. The currencyEURUSD, +0.27%  was last trading around $1.1195, but a session low so far has seen it drop to $1.1098 against the single currency.
No data is scheduled for Monday, though a Federal Open Market Committee meeting will stand out midweek. D.R. Horton Inc. DHI, -2.49%  will report ahead of the bell, while and Microsoft Corp. MSFT, +0.11%   and Texas Instruments Inc.TXN, +0.16%  are coming after the close.
The week also includes biggies such as Caterpiller Inc. CAT, -1.39%  and Apple Inc.AAPL, +0.45%
Across other markets, gold for February delivery GCG5, -0.68%   rose 50 cents to $1,293.10 an ounce. London-traded copper hit a 5 1/2 year low in Asia, hit by a stronger dollar and continued concerns about Chinese demand for the commodity.
Crude for March delivery CLH5, -1.34%   was under pressure, down 63 cents, or 1.4%, to $44.96 a barrel.


Asian Markets at Close Report on January 26, 2015: Japanese stocks retreat amid Greek election concerns, while Chinese market gain | MarketWatch

Japanese stocks retreat amid Greek election concerns, while Chinese market gains

By
ASIA MARKETS REPORTER

HONG KONG (MarketWatch) — Japanese stocks pulled back on Monday as investors worried about Greece remaining in the eurozone after an anti-austerity party won Sunday’s election.
At the same time, Chinese stocks extended a five-day winning streak, with Shanghai markets hitting highest level in more than five years.
The Nikkei Average NIK, -0.25%  ended 0.3% lower, with the broader TopixI0000, +0.00%  inching down 0.1%.
The radical leftist Syriza party won the national election in Greece, triggering concerns about the country’s bailout and ultimately, about Greece remaining in the eurozone.
Against the euro, the yen EURJPY, +0.64%  was trading at ¥132.59, pulling back from its high of ¥130.16 earlier in the day, its best level since September 2013.
Against the dollar, the yen USDJPY, +0.37% weakened to ¥118.17, compared with ¥118.05 at Friday’s Tokyo stock close.
Some Japanese export-related stocks saw substantial losses, with Mazda Motor Corp. 7261, -4.06%  tumbling 4.1%, Olympus Corp. 7733, -1.81%   down 1.8%, Honda Motor Co. Ltd. 7267, -1.36%  off 1.4%, and Sharp Corporation 6753, -1.33%   lower by 1.3%.
South Korean markets also closed in negative territory, with the Kospi Composite Index SEU, -0.02%  down less than 0.1%.
However, Chinese stocks continued to advance after the central bank’s recent moves to inject liquidity into the markets. Shanghai markets extended a five-day winning streak and rose to its highest level in more than five years, as the Shanghai Composite Index SHCOMP, +0.94%  settled 0.9% higher at 3,383.18.
Hong Kong stocks also received a boost from their mainland counterparts, with the Hang Seng Index HSI, +0.24%   rising 0.2%, also up for a fifth day in a row.
Australian markets were closed for a national holiday on Monday.

NYT Today's Headlines - January 26, 2015: Saudis Expand Regional Power as Others Falter.

The New York TimesMost Popular | Video | Subscribe: Digital / Home Delivery

Today's Headlines

Monday, January 26, 2015


Top News
Abdel Fattah el-Sisi, left, the president of Egypt, with King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia in June. The king, who died last week, gave Egypt $12 billion in assistance after Mr. Sisi came to power.
Saudis Expand Regional Power as Others Falter

By DAVID D. KIRKPATRICK

Rather than undermine the Saudi dynasty, the chaos across the region after the Arab Spring revolts appears instead to have lifted the monarchy to unrivaled power and influence.
Alexis Tsipras, leader of the Syriza party, celebrating on Sunday in Athens. Mr. Tsipras has promised to force creditors to renegotiate the terms of Greece's bailout.
Greece Chooses Anti-Austerity Party in Major Shift

By JIM YARDLEY and LIZ ALDERMAN

Syriza's victory, which positions Alexis Tsipras as prime minister, comes as Europe's economic crisis has stirred populist anger.
Sheldon Silver, in an unusual arrangement, would temporarily delegate his duties as speaker to a group of senior Assembly members.
Sheldon Silver to Temporarily Relinquish Speaker Duties

By SUSANNE CRAIG and THOMAS KAPLAN

The decision by the speaker of the New York State Assembly, who is accused of abusing his office to obtain $4 million in payoffs, comes amid mounting pressure from his fellow Democrats.
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »
Editors' Picks
Dino and Lillian Palermo at the Mary Manning Walsh Nursing Home, which had tried to obtain guardianship over Mrs. Palermo.

N.Y. / REGION

To Collect Debts, Nursing Homes Are Seizing Control Over Patients

By NINA BERNSTEIN

A New York State statute to protect the infirm has become a routine tool for nursing homes to ensure patients' bills are paid.

OPINION | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

The Mill of Muslim Radicalism in France

By FARHAD KHOSROKHAVAR

French prisons have become a breeding ground for Islamist extremism partly because they mistreat the Islamic faith.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY

"The middle has basically stayed the same; it hasn't improved. You've got an iPhone now and a better TV, but your median income hasn't changed. What's really changed is the penthouse has become supernice."
LAWRENCE F. KATZ, a Harvard economist, on the shrinking American middle class.
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World
Shaimaa al-Sabbagh receiving assistance after she was shot in clashes with the police in Cairo on Saturday. She later died.
At Least 18 Die in Egyptian Violence

By DAVID D. KIRKPATRICK

The deaths came on the fourth anniversary of the Arab Spring uprising, a reminder of the ruthless crackdown the military-backed government has used to silence any echoes of that revolt.
Shoichi Yukawa, father of the hostage Haruna Yukawa, was interviewed Sunday at home near Tokyo.
Two Japanese Hostages, as Different as Can Be, Linked by Fate in Syria

By MARTIN FACKLER

The surviving hostage is a respected journalist, while the other man was a lost soul who had attempted suicide and seemed to become unhinged by setbacks in life.
Obama Clears a Hurdle to Better Ties With India

By PETER BAKER and ELLEN BARRY

President Obama came to an agreement with Prime Minister Narendra Modi of India on nuclear energy, renewed a 10-year defense pact, agreed to joint military hardware production and resolved to work with India to reduce the threat of greenhouse gas emissions.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »
U.S.
Looking to Uplift, With Navajo 'Rez Metal'

By JULIE TURKEWITZ

As a veteran lawmaker on the Navajo reservation, Edmund Yazzie is an integral part of the establishment. He is also the drummer for the metal band Testify.

SUPREME COURT MEMO

Execution Case Highlights the Power of One Vote

By ADAM LIPTAK

There are nine justices on the Supreme Court. It takes four votes to hear a case, but it takes five to stay an execution. That can leave a lethal gap.
Governor Bill Walker of Alaska addressed the budget problems caused by falling oil prices last week.
As Oil Prices Fall, Alaska's New Governor Faces a Novel Goal, Frugality

By KIRK JOHNSON

Taxes paid by oil companies account for 90 percent of the state's operating budget, and those revenues have sunk with stomach-churning suddenness and depth.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »

Politics
Governor Christie's radio show has become a popular program for WKXW, with as many as 50,000 people calling in, on any given night.
Christie on Air: Undiluted and Pretty Great, if He Says So Himself

By MICHAEL BARBARO

A radio show featuring questions from the public provides an unfiltered picture of Chris Christie, the governor of New Jersey and would-be presidential candidate.
. Asked and Answered
In Move Toward Campaign, Christie Creates PAC and Hires Staff

By MICHAEL BARBARO

Gov. Chris Christie will make his most decisive move yet toward a presidential run by creating a political action committee.
Mitt Romney praying at the beginning of a campaign rally in Elko, Nev., in February 2012. Mr. Romney is expected to bring his faith more to the forefront if he runs again for the presidency.
Romney's Consideration of Candidacy Is Closely Tied to His Faith, Allies Say

By ASHLEY PARKER and ALEX THOMPSON

Mitt Romney's Mormon faith is tied to his sense of service and patriotism, and he may embrace it more openly in a third presidential campaign.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »
Business
Adhanet Kidane, 30, a single mother in Tampa, Fla., earns minimum wage at two fast-food restaurants.
Middle Class Shrinks Further as More Fall Out Instead of Climbing Up

By DIONNE SEARCEY and ROBERT GEBELOFF

Since 2000, middle-class share of households has continued to narrow as more people have fallen to the bottom.
Interactive Graphic INTERACTIVE GRAPHIC: The Shrinking American Middle Class

By ALICIA PARLAPIANO, ROBERT GEBELOFF and SHAN CARTER

How different demographic groups have fared as the middle class has declined.
Catalogs, After Years of Decline, Are Revamped for Changing Times

By REBECCA R. RUIZ

Retailers are still relying on direct mail, even as they spend resources on improving their websites to accommodate the increase of online shoppers.
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »
Technology
Jonathan Mayer, a lawyer and computer scientist, highlighted technology used by Turn, an advertising software company.
Verizon's Mobile 'Supercookies' Seen as Threat to Privacy

By NATASHA SINGER and BRIAN X. CHEN

Advertisers, and possibly other third parties, are finding ways to exploit a hidden tracking mechanism that Verizon Wireless users cannot delete.
Cablevision to Introduce Wi-Fi-Based Phone Plan

By EMILY STEEL

Cablevision will offer a low-cost mobile phone service providing unlimited data, talking and text for as low as $9.95 a month, but coverage could be spotty.
Jeff Bezos of Amazon, which bought a chip maker linked to advanced data networking.

BITS BLOG

Tech Giants Invest in New Dreams of Grandeur

By QUENTIN HARDY

A series of investments by some of the tech industry's biggest companies may sound odd, but they point to larger ambitions in moving giant amounts of data.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »
Sports
The Super Bowl will be played at University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale, Ariz., which expects to spend $2.1 million on security.
Albatross of Debt Weighs on Super Bowl City

By KEN BELSON

The mayor of Glendale, Ariz., which is hosting the Super Bowl, is not shy about criticizing the costs involved, particularly since the city has a reputation for betting big on sports - and paying a price for it.
Tom Brady on Sunday, a week before the Patriots were to face the Seahawks in the Super Bowl.

SPORTS OF THE TIMES

It Doesn't Take a Scientist to Sense a Shift in Momentum

By WILLIAM C. RHODEN

Heading into the Super Bowl, an us-against-the-world theme is emerging for the New England Patriots.
At 33, Serena Williams plays opponents who are nearly all from the younger set. Garbiñe Muguruza is 21.
Serena Williams Drops a Set, Then Cruises

By CHRISTOPHER CLAREY

Williams lost the first set before rallying for a 2-6, 6-3, 6-2 victory over Garbiñe Muguruza that put her back into the quarterfinals of the Australian Open, a tournament she has won five times.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »
Arts
Martins Imhangbe plays the central role in

THEATER REVIEW | 'LIONBOY'

A Valiant Cub Goes on the Hunt

By CHARLES ISHERWOOD

Set in a dystopian future in which corporations are more powerful than governments, "Lionboy" focuses on a young hero who comes home one day to find that his parents have disappeared.
Mohamedou Ould Slahi

BOOKS OF THE TIMES

From Inside Prison, a Terrorism Suspect Shares His Diary

By SCOTT SHANE

Mohamedou Ould Slahi's memoir, "Guantánamo Diary," was published after a seven-year legal battle and with heavy redactions from military censors.
A rendering for the proposed Brooklyn Public Library in Brooklyn Heights that has apartments on top.

CRITIC'S NOTEBOOK

Evolution for Libraries in Brooklyn

By MICHAEL KIMMELMAN

Proposals to sell and develop library sites in Brooklyn are being met with the usual arguments, but the plans actually look promising.
For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »
New York
New York Braces for Blizzard Amid Warnings of Closings and Hazards

By COLIN MOYNIHAN

The storm is expected to begin with flurries late Monday morning and gather force as the day goes on, bringing high winds, low visibility and "treacherous" road conditions.
A newspaper photograph of Etan Patz, who disappeared in 1979, was part of a memorial in SoHo in May 2012.
Defense in Long-Awaited Trial Will Argue Another Man Killed Etan Patz

By JAMES C. McKINLEY Jr.