Translate

Search This Blog

Search Tool




Jan 25, 2015

NYT Today's Headlines January 25, 2015.

The New York TimesMost Popular | Video | Subscribe: Digital / Home Delivery

Today's Headlines

Sunday, January 25, 2015

Top News
Republican Governors Buck Party Line on Raising Taxes

By ADAM NAGOURNEY and SHAILA DEWAN

There are proposals for raising the sales tax in Michigan, a tax on e-cigarettes in Utah and gas taxes in South Carolina and South Dakota, to name a few.
A mesothelioma research center on the Columbia University Medical Center campus of NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital is at the heart of the criminal case against Sheldon Silver.
In Silver Case, U.S. Cites Link to Litigation Tied to Asbestos

By DIONNE SEARCEY, ANEMONA HARTOCOLLIS, RUSS BUETTNER and DAVID W. CHEN

A doctor's obsession with raising money for research on a rare form of cancer helped set off a chain of events that culminated in New York State Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver's arrest.
Mary Paloglou with a family photo taken before her birth. The death of her father, Antonio Ciccarello, has been ruled a homicide.
A Twist in the Murder of a 97-Year-Old Man: He Was Knifed 5 Decades Ago

By J. DAVID GOODMAN

The New York City medical examiner determined that an operation after the stabbing in the 1950s led to Antonio Ciccarello's death in September. The police have opened a murder investigation.
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »
Editors' Picks

BOOKS

Jill Leovy's 'Ghettoside'

By JENNIFER GONNERMAN

In "Ghettoside," Jill Leovy describes a homicide case in South Los Angeles to examine the epidemic of unsolved murders of African-American men in America.
Seth Stephens-Davidowitz

OPINION | OP-ED | SETH STEPHENS-DAVIDOWITZ

Searching for Sex

By SETH STEPHENS-DAVIDOWITZ

What big data reveals and conceals about our desires, our bodies and our many insecurities.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY

"The nets go straight out of the bag into the sea. That's why the incidence for malaria here is so high. The people don't use the mosquito nets for mosquitoes. They use them to fish."
ISABEL MARQUES DA SILVA, a marine biologist at Universidade Lúrio in Mozambique.
Today's Videos
Video VIDEO: With Nets, Fighting Malaria and Hunger
Millions of mosquito nets are given out fight to malaria in Africa, yet many faced with hunger use them as fish nets, creating potential environmental problems.
For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »
ADVERTISEMENT
World
The Molenbeek district in Brussels, where a jihadist pipeline has made Belgium Europe's biggest per capita contributor of fighters to Syria.
Belgium Confronts the Jihadist Danger Within

By ANDREW HIGGINS

The thwarted terrorist operation highlighted the dangers posed by a well-developed underground pipeline that has made Belgium the biggest per capita contributor in Europe of fighters to Syria.
Haruna Yukawa, right, in an image released by the Islamic State on Jan. 20, was said on Saturday to have been killed. The other hostage, Kenji Goto, appeared to still be alive.
Video Appears to Show Decapitated Body of a Japanese Hostage of ISIS

By MARTIN FACKLER

Japan's prime minister on Sunday condemned the apparent killing by the Islamic State of the hostage as an "outrageous and unforgivable act of violence," and demanded the immediate release of a second hostage.
Meant to Keep Malaria Out, Mosquito Nets Are Used to Haul Fish In

By JEFFREY GETTLEMAN

The nets, with holes smaller than mosquitoes, trap much more than traditional fishing nets do and could wipe out stressed fish populations in Africa.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »
U.S.
When Andrea Webb remarried without an annulment, she was told by a priest that her status was akin to that of an adulterer.
As Vatican Revisits Divorce, Many Catholics Long for Acceptance

By MICHAEL PAULSON

Pope Francis has begun a debate about the church's treatment of divorced Catholics, and in October, a group of bishops will decide whether to recommend changes to him.
. Stories of Catholic Marriage and Divorce
April DeBoer, right, with her partner, Jayne Rowse. They are challenging Michigan's ban on same-sex marriage.
One Couple's Unanticipated Journey to Center of Landmark Gay Rights Case

By JULIE BOSMAN

April DeBoer and Jayne Rowse of Hazel Park, Mich., were concerned about custody of their children if either parent died. Their efforts have evolved into a Supreme Court challenge of state bans on same-sex marriage.
The arrest of Devyani Khobragade, center, was a factor in the recent strained relations between India and the United States.
Human Rights Groups Press Obama on India

By PETER BAKER

As President Obama visits India to improve the strained relationship between the two countries, some human rights groups hope their concerns are not swept under the rug.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »
Politics
Prepping for 2016, a Gathering of Republicans in Iowa Leans Hard to the Right

By ASHLEY PARKER and TRIP GABRIEL

The more centrist potential nominees for the party, such as Jeb Bush and Mitt Romney, were barely represented at Saturday's forum.
Obama to Request Research Funding for Treatments Tailored to Patients' DNA

By ROBERT PEAR

President Obama's budget will seek hundreds of millions of dollars for "personalized medicine," a proposal that is expected to receive bipartisan support in Congress.
Indian forces patrolling around the Taj Mahal. President Obama canceled his visit to the famous site to go to Saudi Arabia.
Obama Will End India Trip Early to Visit Saudi Arabia

By PETER BAKER

The president will cancel a tour of the Taj Mahal and instead fly to Saudi Arabia, where he will meet with the late King Abdullah's successor, White House officials said Saturday.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »
Business
Jeff Hill, a founder of the Hill Wine Company, pleaded not guilty in a Napa County court to stealing grapes owned by another winery.
In Vino Veritas. In Napa, Deceit.

By VINDU GOEL

Jeffry Hill is accused of passing off wine from surrounding counties as a Napa Valley product and of stealing the grapes of another winery. His company has filed for bankruptcy and is being shut.

THE UPSHOT

A Quiet Revolution in Helping Lift the Burden of Student Debt

By KEVIN CAREY

Some little-noticed legislative changes have created conditions for a far-reaching overhaul of how a college education is bought and paid for.
A renewal-of-vows ceremony this month in Florida, after a same-sex marriage ban was ruled unconstitutional. A study found that societies with greater wealth and economic freedom show more tolerance toward gay people.

THE UPSHOT

Economic Freedom Does Not Necessarily Lead to Greater Tolerance

By TYLER COWEN

Open markets tend to lead to open minds, but not always, especially regarding race.
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »
Technology
Brent Grinna founded the data-analytics start-up EverTrue out of frustration with traditional fund-raising techniques.

TECHNOPHORIA

Your College May Be Banking on Your Facebook Likes

By NATASHA SINGER

College fund-raising offices are turning to a handful of start-ups to help identify prospective alumni donors through their social media activity.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »
Sports
Elizabeth Cera, right, and her sister, Sujei, third from right, make up the starting backcourt for the Levelland High School girls' basketball team.

NOT THE KNICKS: LEVELLAND LOBOETTES

New to U.S., Sisters Help School Return to Dominance in a Flash

By SCOTT CACCIOLA

Thanks to two sisters from Mexico, the tradition-rich Levelland High School girls' basketball team, which has not won a Texas state title since 1997, is an up-tempo, high-scoring contender.
. More Articles in This Series »
The American Madison Keys upset the Czech Petra Kvitova, 6-4, 7-5, at the Australian Open.
After Being Told How Good She Can Be, an American Wins on a Big Stage

By CHRISTOPHER CLAREY

Madison Keys, 19, knocked off the two-time Wimbledon winner Petra Kvitova of the Czech Republic in the third round of the Australian Open.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »
Arts
Tonya Pinkins, left, and Dianne Wiest are finding rehearsals for the dark comedy
When Racism Can't Be Ignored

By ALEXIS SOLOSKI

"Rasheeda Speaking," by the Chicago playwright Joel Drake Johnson, is a dark comedy about racism both covert and obvious, and stars Tonya Pinkins and Dianne Wiest.
Halley Feiffer, right, with Betty Gilpin, who is starring in Ms. Feiffer's play
Daughters in the Business

By LAURA COLLINS-HUGHES

Halley Feiffer's new play, "I'm Gonna Pray for You So Hard," focuses on an actress and her better-known father, a situation she knows firsthand.
Rhiannon Giddens, celebrated on the folk circuit as the leader of the Carolina Chocolate Drops, is about to release a solo album.
A Solo Spotlight for a Powerful Voice

By JON PARELES

Rhiannon Giddens, celebrated on the folk circuit as the leader of the Carolina Chocolate Drops, releases a solo album that steps beyond the tradition of African-American string bands.
For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »
New York
Police officers investigating the shooting inside a home on 148th Avenue in Queens, where four people were shot early Saturday morning.
Queens Father Killed 3 and Himself, Police Say

By BENJAMIN MUELLER and JOHN SURICO