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Dec 15, 2014

NYT Today's Headlines - December 15, 2014: Top News: Backing C.I.A., Cheney Revisits Torture Debate From Bush Era

The New York TimesMost Popular | Video | Subscribe: Digital / Home Delivery

Today's Headlines

Monday, December 15, 2014


Top News
Dick Cheney
Backing C.I.A., Cheney Revisits Torture Debate From Bush Era

By SCOTT SHANE

Former Vice President Dick Cheney mounted a spirited rebuttal to the Senate committee's torture report, saying there was no comparison between the C.I.A.'s tactics and terrorists' actions.
Norman Seabrook at his union's offices in Lower Manhattan.
At Rikers, a Roadblock to Reform

By MICHAEL SCHWIRTZ and MICHAEL WINERIP

Norman Seabrook's two-decade reign as president of the Correction Officers' Benevolent Association has paid huge dividends for his members, but has also fed a culture of corruption and violence at the Rikers Island jail complex.
A woman ran to an officer in Sydney, Australia, where hostages were being held on Monday.
Hostages Flee Standoff at Cafe in Sydney

By MICHELLE INNIS

Five people fled a cafe in central Sydney where an armed individual was holding an unknown number of hostages and a black flag with Arabic script was displayed in a window.
. Live Coverage From the Sydney Morning Herald
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »
Editors' Picks

U.S.

Waters Warm, and Cod Catch Ebbs in Maine

By MICHAEL WINES and JESS BIDGOOD

The Gulf of Maine's waters are warming - faster than almost any ocean waters on earth, scientists say - and fish are voting with their fins for cooler places to live.

OPINION | OPINIONATOR | MENAGERIE

The Wrong Dog

By ERICA-LYNN HUBERTY

We let ourselves believe that beneath our rescued puppy's strange, erratic behavior was a good, loving pet.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY

"I would do it again in a minute."
DICK CHENEY, former vice president, defending his advocacy of interrogation techniques that a Senate report last week condemned as inhumane and ineffective.
Today's Videos
Video VIDEO: China's E-Cigarette Boom
Ninety percent of the world's e-cigarettes are made in China. Experts warn, however, that poorly manufactured devices can vaporize heavy metals and carcinogens alongside the nicotine.
For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »
ADVERTISEMENT
World
Security outside the theater before the premiere of
Sony's International Incident: Making Kim Jong-un's Head Explode

By MARTIN FACKLER, BROOKS BARNES and DAVID E. SANGER

Sony's executives now say they knew that basing a film on the assassination of Kim Jong-un of North Korea had inherent risks.
Indian children carrying coal to a crushing machine in the state of Meghalaya. India is the world's third largest carbon polluter.

NEWS ANALYSIS

A Climate Accord Based on Global Peer Pressure

By CORAL DAVENPORT

The agreement reached in Lima, Peru, would be a breakthrough in 20 years of efforts to create a global warming accord, but it falls short of what scientists say is needed.
Prime Minister Shinzo Abe of Japan at a news conference in Tokyo after his party won a majority of parliamentary seats in a snap election held Sunday.
In Japan, a Landslide Victory for Abe's Party, Despite Scant Enthusiasm

By MARTIN FACKLER

Exit polls showed the governing party of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on course to win as many as 306 seats, enough to keep its majority.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »
U.S.
A provision in the federal spending bill prohibits lowering salt limits for school lunches.
In Final Spending Bill, Salty Food and Belching Cows Are Winners

By ROBERT PEAR

The $1.1 trillion package that cleared the Senate over the weekend was, like many of its predecessors, filled with provisions to satisfy special interests.
. Battle Over Spending Bill Exposes Democratic Rift
. G.O.P. Angst Over 2016 Led to Provision on Funding
. From Contribution Limits to the Sage Grouse: What Is in the Spending Bill?
A member of the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights handed out information about how to join the group and gain access to immigration lawyers.
Undocumented Immigrants Line Up for Door Opened by Obama

By JULIA PRESTON

Thousands gathered for an information session organized by advocacy groups offering unauthorized immigrants assessments of whether they meet the requirements to apply to stay in the United States.
Gov. Sam Brownback was re-elected in Kansas despite criticism of his $7 billion in tax cuts over several years. His budget director, however, left an opening for the cuts to be revisited.
Brownback's Tax Cuts Not Set in Stone as Kansas Faces Budget Shortfall

By JOHN ELIGON

Within days of winning re-election, Gov. Sam Brownback was confronted with a grimmer budget picture as fiscal experts forecast that the state would bring in a billion dollars less than initially projected over the next two years.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »
Politics
John O. Brennan
Brennan Draws on Bond With Obama in Backing C.I.A.

By PETER BAKER and MARK MAZZETTI

The close relationship between John O. Brennan, the C.I.A.'s director, and President Obama helped shape Brennan's assertive response to a scathing Senate report on agency torture.
Senate Affirms Ambassador for Freedom of Religion

By ROBERT PEAR

The Senate has confirmed the nomination of David N. Saperstein, a prominent Reform rabbi, to be ambassador at large for international religious freedom, in charge of countering religious persecution around the world.
Secretary of State John Kerry, right, and Russia's foreign minister, Sergey V. Lavrov, during their meeting in Rome on Sunday.
Kerry Piles on Miles, Pressing for a Middle East Compromise

By STEVEN ERLANGER

Secretary of State John F. Kerry traveled to Rome on Sunday to meet Israeli and Palestinian leaders, the new European foreign policy chief and the foreign ministers of Russia, France, Britain and Germany.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »
Business
Lei Jun, chief of Xiaomi, which he helped found in 2010 and which is now China's No. 1 maker of smartphones.
The Rise of a New Smartphone Giant: China's Xiaomi

By PAUL MOZUR and SHANSHAN WANG

Founded in 2010 to sell cheap phones online, the company has become the No. 3 producer worldwide behind Apple and Samsung and is looking toward Brazil and India.
Michael Lynton, chief of Sony Pictures, is said to have sought the support of fellow studio heads.
Sony Pictures Demands That News Agencies Delete 'Stolen' Data

By MICHAEL CIEPLY and BROOKS BARNES

A letter sent to news media outlets warned against using the information revealed by hackers who attacked the studio's computer systems.
The Tamar natural gas platform off Israel's coast is run by Noble Energy, based in Houston.
Israel's Gas Offers Lifeline for Peace

By STANLEY REED and CLIFFORD KRAUSS

A new bonanza of resources could improve the nation's ties with Egypt, Jordan and even the Palestinian Authority. The linchpin of this diplomatic push: an oil company in Texas.
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »
Technology
Fritjof Andersson, chief of a social media start-up in Stockholm. Because of a housing shortage, he has struggled to bring engineers to the city.
Stockholm's Housing Shortage Threatens to Stifle Fast-Growing Start-Ups

By MARK SCOTT

The Swedish capital serves as a cautionary tale about the troubles that arise when a booming technology sector runs into city planning rules unchanged for decades.
In Big Data, Shepherding Comes First

By STEVE LOHR

Aspiring big data software companies find themselves training, advising and building pilot projects for their customers - acting far more as services companies than they hope to be eventually.
Jeff Bezos, chief executive of Amazon, right, was interviewed this month by Henry Blodget of Business Insider.

BITS BLOG

Jeff Bezos' Lemonade Stand

By DAVID STREITFELD

The expansion of Amazon Prime benefits, as well as the company's many other projects, appears to be fueled in part by fattened margins on physical books.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »
Sports
A Speck on the Map Gushes Talent

By DAVID WALDSTEIN

The small country of Curaçao, part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, has been the source of a surge of talent to Major League Baseball.
The Browns' Johnny Manziel being sacked by the Bengals' Geno Atkins on Sunday.

BENGALS 30, BROWNS 0

As Johnny Manziel Takes a Hit, So Does Cleveland

By BEN SHPIGEL

The buzz created by Browns Coach Mike Pettine's decision to put the rookie quarterback Manziel under center was drowned out by the Bengals' stout defense.
The Redskins' Robert Griffin III escaped the Giants' Jason Pierre-Paul and dived into the end zone for an apparent touchdown at the end of the first half. The score was nullified after a review.

GIANTS 24, REDSKINS 13

Odell Beckham Jr. Puts On a Show, Leaving Defenders and Fans Stupefied

By BILL PENNINGTON

Bekham scored three touchdowns, and the Giants avoided falling too far behind as Robert Griffin III's dive for an apparent score was eventually ruled a fumble out the side of the end zone.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »
Arts
Glen Caci towers over Ilenia Caleo in

THEATER REVIEW | 'NELLA TEMPESTA'

Two Slaves and a Hurricane Stir Up a Youthquake

By BEN BRANTLEY

Motus, an Italian troupe, presents "The Tempest" as a full-throated cry to the young and disaffected to get off their collective duffs, shake off their shackles and do something.
Cecilia Giménez, center, whose attempt to touch up a fresco brought her fame, with her siblings, Antonio, 74, and María, 76, in her art-filled living room.

BORJA JOURNAL

A Town, if Not a Painting, Is Restored

By DOREEN CARVAJAL

Grief at a botched retouching of a church fresco has turned to gratitude for divine intervention - the blessing of free publicity - that has made Borja, Spain, a magnet for thousands of curious tourists.

CORRECTED Today's Headlines December 14, 2014: China's E-Cigarette Boom Lacks Oversight for Safety

The New York TimesMost Popular | Video | Subscribe: Digital / Home Delivery

Today's Headlines

Sunday, December 14, 2014

Top News

THE NEW SMOKE

China's E-Cigarette Boom Lacks Oversight for Safety

By DAVID BARBOZA

Almost all of the world's e-cigarettes are made without oversight, and experts say flawed or sloppy manufacturing could account for some of the hazards seen in the devices.
An Ebola Orphan's Plea in Africa: 'Do You Want Me?'

By JEFFREY GETTLEMAN

After her mother died of Ebola, a young girl in Sierra Leone was left an orphan when nobody in her village, even relatives, wanted to take her, though she showed no symptoms of the virus.
. How to Help Sweetie Sweetie
Oussama el-Saadi, chairman of the Grimhojvej mosque, which critics say breeds radicalism.
For Jihadists, Denmark Tries Rehabilitation

By ANDREW HIGGINS

A pioneering program treats former fighters not as criminals or potential terrorists, but as wayward youths who deserve a second chance.
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »

QUOTATION OF THE DAY

"This is really a chaotic industry. I hope it will soon be well regulated."
JACKIE ZHUANG, deputy general manager of Huabao International, a tobacco flavoring company in Shanghai and an expert on China's e-cigarette market.
Today's Videos
Video VIDEO: Porchetta Pork Roast
Melissa Clark makes pork shoulder seasoned with fennel fronds, rosemary and sage.
. Related Article
Video VIDEO: Bill Cunningham | Holiday Magic
The hope and love of the season were on full display as the city exploded with holiday celebrations.
. Related Article
Video VIDEO: Scavenging for Art
Free Art Friday is an art scavenger hunt open to all artists and art enthusiasts. It has popped up in cities globally, including New York.
. Related Article
For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »
ADVERTISEMENT
World
In Myanmar, Racing to Save a Colonial Past in Decay

By JANE PERLEZ

Preservationists are working to salvage badly deteriorating buildings in Yangon's historic downtown.
Delegates at the United Nations conference in Lima, Peru, which aimed to stop a 3.6-degree rise in global temperatures.
Nations Plod Forward on Climate Change Accord

By CORAL DAVENPORT

The draft deal would, for the first time in history, commit every nation to cutting its greenhouse gas emissions, but it would still fall far short of what scientists say is needed.
Senator Mark Udall, Democrat of Colorado, said the C.I.A. had not learned from its mistakes.
On Torture Report, Colorado's Udall Leaves Subtlety at Door on the Way Out

By CARL HULSE

The Democratic senator continues to deliver scathing criticism of the C.I.A. and the Obama administration for their responses to the Intelligence Committee's findings.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »
U.S.
Thousands March in Washington to Protest Police Violence

By JENNIFER STEINHAUER and ELENA SCHNEIDER

Wearing T-shirts that read "Black Lives Matter" and chanting "I can't breathe," demonstrators evoked memories of civil rights marches of the past.
More Files Are Released in Shooting in Ferguson

By MONICA DAVEY

Robert P. McCulloch, the St. Louis County prosecuting attorney, apologized for failing to immediately make public all documents tied to the grand jury's decision in the Michael Brown case.
Patricia Richardson, 78, a retiree in Salem, N.H., has taken energy-saving measures and said she could not understand why her bills had still increased.
Even Before Long Winter Begins, Energy Bills Send Shivers in New England

By KATHARINE Q. SEELYE

Customers are facing drastically increased heating bills in New England, which already has the highest rates in the 48 contiguous states.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »
Politics
Senator Mike Lee, Republican of Utah, center, at the Capitol on Saturday. He and Senator Ted Cruz, Republican of Texas, delayed a vote on the spending bill to underscore their objections to President Obama's executive action on immigration.
Senate Passes $1.1 Trillion Spending Bill, Joining House

By ASHLEY PARKER and ROBERT PEAR

A rare Saturday session bridged some disagreements, as the chamber approved the measure to fund core domestic government operations.
. Roll Call for the Senate Vote on the Spending Bill
Senator Elizabeth Warren argued against a provision in the spending bill that would roll back Wall Street regulations.
Battle Over Spending Bill Exposes Democratic Rift

By ASHLEY PARKER and JEREMY W. PETERS

Senator Elizabeth Warren's fight over a provision in the spending bill has elevated her status as leader of the Democratic Party's liberal base.

WHITE HOUSE MEMO

Obama's Pleas Foreshadow Tense Relationship With a New Congress

By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS

The fact that President Obama had to lobby his own party so intensely to avoid a government shutdown speaks to the challenge he faces in dealing with a hostile Congress.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »
Business

THE UPSHOT

Why U.S. Women Are Leaving Jobs Behind

By CLAIRE CAIN MILLER and LIZ ALDERMAN

The work force participation of American women has declined, as it has for men. But their situation is often quite different.
Suresh Ramamurthi and his wife bought Citizens Bank of Weir, right, in a small Kansas town, with a goal of clearing industry logjams.

DEALBOOK

Small Bank in Kansas Is a Financial Testing Ground

By NATHANIEL POPPER

The owners of CBW in Weir, Kan., want to find solutions to problems - like obstacles to quick money transfers - that vex consumers nationwide.

BITS BLOG

Trying to Swim in a Sea of Social Media Invective

By JENNA WORTHAM

Social media companies are often reluctant to become arbiters of appropriate and inappropriate speech online.
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »
Technology
M.N. Reddy, the police commissioner of Bangalore, announced the arrest on Saturday of Mehdi Masroor Biswas, 24.
Online Trail Leads to Arrest of Indian as Man Behind Posts Backing the Islamic State

By GARDINER HARRIS

As the police closed in on him, Mehdi Masroor Biswas gave a panicky interview to an Indian newspaper saying that his comments in interviews with Channel 4 had been misconstrued and that his email had been hacked.

NEWS ANALYSIS

Where Tech Giants Protect Privacy

By MARK SCOTT

Regulations on personal data are tougher abroad.
A television production line in China. China and South Korea faced off over LCD TV screens.
W.T.O. Fails on High-Tech Tariff Deal

By JONATHAN WEISMAN and PAUL MOZUR

A dispute between China and South Korea scuttled a deal that would have reduced global tariffs on $1 trillion in information technology goods.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »
Sports
Marcus Mariota after winning the Heisman Trophy. He led Oregon to the Pacific-12 title and the No. 2 seed in the College Football Playoff.
Marcus Mariota of Oregon Wins Heisman Trophy, and Hawaii Rejoices

By TIM ROHAN

Mariota, a quarterback, became the first Hawaii native and the first Ducks player to win the award, given to college football's most outstanding player.
In 2009, the Knicks wanted to draft Stephen Curry, but so did the Warriors, and they went first.

ON PRO BASKETBALL

Coveting Sharpshooter, Knicks Just Missed

By HARVEY ARATON

A desire to draft point guard Stephen Curry in 2009 set in motion events that ultimately spelled very different outcomes for the Knicks and the Golden State Warriors.
Navy quarterback Keenan Reynolds (19) tumbling into the end zone for 1-yard score against Army. He threw for 77 yards and rushed for 100.

NAVY 17, ARMY 10

Navy Regroups to Beat Army for 13th Straight Game

By TODD JACOBSON

The Black Knights did a lot of things right but fell to the Midshipmen in the 115th meeting between the teams.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »