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Nov 29, 2014

The Economist Insights | Weekly Digest:How risky is 'small' data? Originally Published on November 28, 2014

The Economist

The Economist
Weekly Digest
Issue #55
Analysis
A lack of data is putting retail banks at greater risk.This Economist Intelligence Unit report, sponsored by SAP, investigates how banks are using big data to improve risk-management and compliance performance.



 
UAE Expats and the Bottom Line
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The future for CIOs
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The new silk road
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report imageThe future of healthcare in Africa
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Opinion
logoMental health is everyone’s business
In the UK, despite the fact that one in six workers is experiencing depression, anxiety or stress, many do not feel able to discuss this at work or seek support.

Sue Baker, Director, Time to Change
Read the full article>>
Closing in on microbiome therapy
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Don't underestimate the socio-economic impact of depression
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report imageGreening our cities
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Rethinking leadership
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View all opinions >>
Upcoming events
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The times are changing in the Horn of Africa and the wider East African Region. Ethiopia is now garnering attention from foreign and private investors—from London to Nairobi to Johannesburg.To explore this potential, The Economist Event’s Ethiopia Summit on February 4th and 5th 2015 at the Sheraton Addis—chaired by The Economist's Executive Editor Daniel Franklin—will bring together a host of senior experts from a variety of different industry sectors.

H.E. Dr Debretsion Gebremichael
Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Communication and Information Technology 
Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia
Khalid Bomba 
Chief Executive Officer
Ethiopian Agricultural Transformation Agency
Reg Hankey
Chief Executive Officer 
Pittards
Tewolde GebreMariam
Chief Executive Officer
Ethiopian Airlines
View event

BBC Breaking New | Breaking News - November 29, 2014: Hosni Mubarak cleared in murder case.

BBC
BBC News
Breaking News

Hosni Mubarak cleared in murder case

Court drops case against former Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak on charges of conspiring to kill protesters during the 2011 uprising
For more details, see the BBC News website

NYT Today's Headlines on November 29, 2014: Top News. Obama Pushed 'Fullest Extent' of His Powers on Immigration Plan.

The New York TimesMost Popular | Video | Subscribe: Digital / Home Delivery

Today's Headlines

Saturday, November 29, 2014


Top News
From left, Lorella Praeli, Chela Praeli and Ligia Jimenez during President Obama's speech last week at a school in Las Vegas.
Obama Pushed 'Fullest Extent' of His Powers on Immigration Plan

By MICHAEL D. SHEAR and JULIA PRESTON

Months before President Obama took action to reshape the nation's immigration system, advisers huddled daily under orders to use "our legal authorities to the fullest extent" on the new policy, an official said.
Protesters staged a
Protesters United Against Ferguson Decision, but Challenged in Unity

By JOHN ELIGON

Activists are divided by aim and by geography, with goals of justice for Michael Brown or an end to lethal police force against minorities.
Ray Rice during a game in August.
Ray Rice Wins Reinstatement to N.F.L. in Arbitration

By KEN BELSON

A former federal judge sided with Ray Rice, the former Baltimore Ravens running back who was penalized twice for knocking out his then-fiancée.
. Documents  Document: The Rice Suspension Ruling
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »
Editors' Picks
The main market in the Shatila refugee camp, one of two such rapidly growing settlements on the edge of Beirut, Lebanon.

WORLD | SHATILA JOURNAL

Palestinian Refuge for 6 Decades, Now Flooded From Syria

By ANNE BARNARD

The Syrian civil war has driven a wave of Syrians into Lebanon, roughly doubling the population of the Palestinian refugee camp of Shatila.

OPINION | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

The Pain of the Watermelon Joke

By JACQUELINE WOODSON

The history is more than an ugly stereotype of African-Americans.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY

"In human history, there has never been a better time to be a drinker."
GARRETT C. PECK, who has written books on alcohol and Prohibition, on the explosion of distilleries and craft beer, reflecting demand for local products, including single-barrel $100-a-bottle bourbon.
Today's Videos
Video VIDEO: Black Friday in the U.S. and Europe
Shoppers from London, Glasgow, New York City and Washington, D.C., took part in Black Friday. The practice of offering low prices the day after Thanksgiving is spreading across the Atlantic.
Video VIDEO: An Asylum's Final Secrets
In New York, more than 55,000 deceased psychiatric patients lie in unmarked graves. Near the former Willard Asylum, a small committee has spent the past three years fighting to memorialize the dead.
For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »
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World
The site of one of several bomb attacks at the central mosque in the northern Nigerian city of Kano on Friday.
Fatal Attack Causes Chaos at Mosque in Nigeria

By IBRAHIM GARBA SHUAIBU

A state deputy police commissioner said 35 people were killed when militants set off explosions at the central mosque in the northern city of Kano.
Prime Minister David Cameron of Britain hopes to curb immigration in his country, but he has not proposed imposing quotas.
British Premier Plans Tougher Stance as Anti-Immigration Sentiment Grows

By STEVEN ERLANGER

Prime Minister David Cameron said he would make Britain a less-attractive place for migrants to seek employment and would try to impose a four-year waiting period for social and welfare benefits.
Shoppers in east Belfast, where hate crimes have risen amid a surge in the immigrant population.
In Northern Ireland, a Wave of Immigrants Is Met With Fists

By DOUGLAS DALBY

Racially motivated attacks have increased at a time when open borders in the European Union have led waves of illegal and legal migrants to Britain and Ireland.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »
U.S.
The Rev. Matt Brogli, a pastor in North Carolina, has sent congregants to a secular psychologist.
More Pastors Embrace Talk of Mental Ills

By JAN HOFFMAN

Matt Brogli, a Southern Baptist pastor in North Carolina, is among a growing number of Evangelical clergy members sending mentally troubled congregants to secular professionals.
Budget Problems? Kentucky and Elsewhere Find Answer in Bottle

By JENNIFER STEINHAUER

The alcohol industry is booming in many states, fueled by a growing taste for whiskey and craft beer, and changes to regulations and tax policies.
Diana Rabinoff inside a shooting range at the Centennial Gun Club in Centennial, Colo.
Ready, Aim, Fire, Then Relax in the Lounge

By JULIE TURKEWITZ

A new wave of luxurious gun clubs is popping up around urban centers, modeled after country clubs to appeal to people who did not grow up in gun-owning households.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »
Politics
Joseph P. Clancy, the interim director of the Secret Service, said he jumped at the chance to lead an agency he considered his
Ex-Chief of Obama Security Works to Boost Scarred Secret Service

By MICHAEL S. SCHMIDT

Joseph P. Clancy leads an agency marred by embarrassing incidents, particularly one in which an Army veteran with a knife penetrated the White House.
U.N. Panel Cites Concerns With U.S. Security Practices

By NICK CUMMING-BRUCE

In a report delivered in Geneva, the United Nations Convention Against Torture found issue with domestic law enforcement practices and security policies.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »
Business
A hydraulic fracturing well in Colorado. With the technology, America is expected to surpass Saudi Arabia in oil production.
Free Fall in Oil Price Underscores Shift Away From OPEC

By CLIFFORD KRAUSS

The inability or unwillingness of OPEC to curb production showed that it was no longer the dominating force behind global fuel supplies and prices.
. The Upshot: Oil Prices Are Plunging. Here's Who Wins.
Protesters outside a Walmart in Washington were among the thousands who demonstrated against the retailer on Friday.
On Black Friday, Walmart Is Pressed for Wage Increases

By STEVEN GREENHOUSE

Thousands descended on Walmarts across the country on one of the busiest shopping days of the year to protest what they said were the company's low wages.
Maha Taibah, an adviser to Saudi Arabia's labor ministry, says that at the present time in her country,
A Conundrum for Saudis: Women at Work

By DIONNE SEARCEY

A group of academics is joining the Saudi government in a project to lower the hurdles keeping women from becoming employed.
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »
Technology

THE UPSHOT

Shopping on a Phone Is Still Uncommon but Growing Fast

By CLAIRE CAIN MILLER

Sales on computers are growing much faster than sales in offline stores, and sales on mobile phones are growing faster still.

THE UPSHOT

A Facebook Change Makes It Harder for Political Campaigns to See Your Friends

By DEREK WILLIS

The move to limit access is good for users' privacy, but also probably for Facebook's bottom line.

Q&A

Use Caution in Updating Adobe Flash Player or Reader

By J. D. BIERSDORFER

Plus, how to display new purchases in iTunes.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »
Sports
Commissioner Roger Goodell and the N.F.L. did not impress an arbitrator who overturned Ray Rice's suspension.

SPORTS OF THE TIMES

Ray Rice Ruling Highlights Roger Goodell's Missteps

By JULIET MACUR

An arbitrator's overturning of Rice's suspension put yet another crack in the credibility and authority of the N.F.L. commissioner.
Michigan's streak of having more than 100,000 people at every game since 1975 nearly came to an end this season.
Amid Tumult, Michigan Football Aims to Reclaim Its Footing

By TIM ROHAN

Michigan must beat its biggest rival, Ohio State, on Saturday to become eligible to play in a bowl game, but the troubled program faces bigger challenges as the university's sports culture is questioned.
Phillip Hughes, billed as a rising international star among Australian batters, was hit in the head by a ball during a domestic game in Sydney.
Australia Promises Scrutiny After Death of Cricket Star Phillip Hughes

By ALAN COWELL

Officials, however, displayed little readiness to disrupt what one administrator called the game's "finely tuned balance between bat and ball."
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »
Arts

MUSEUM REVIEW

Turing's Spirit Hovers at a Restored Estate

By EDWARD ROTHSTEIN

The museum at Bletchley Park, the World War II British code-breaking center, sheds light on methods and people, including Alan Turing.
The Kunstmuseum Bern in Switzerland, which revealed a list of the 250