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Nov 8, 2014

RT Keiser Report: Fools and Their Money (E676) - Published on November 6, 2014.



Keiser Report: Fools & Their Money (E676)

NYT | Today's Headlines - November 8, 2014: Top News Loretta Lynch, Federal Prosecutor, Will Be Nominated for Attorney General

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Today's Headlines

Saturday, November 8, 2014


Top News
Loretta E. Lynch testifying in New York last year at a hearing of the Moreland Commission to Investigate Public Corruption. Ms. Lynch is a United States attorney who has twice been confirmed by the Senate, in 2000 and in 2010.
Loretta Lynch, Federal Prosecutor, Will Be Nominated for Attorney General

By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS and MATT APUZZO

Ms. Lynch, the top federal prosecutor in Brooklyn, is the leading contender to succeed Eric H. Holder Jr., who is stepping down.
The Supreme Court will again hear arguments about the Affordable Care Act, this time focusing on the language of one passage.
Justices to Hear New Challenge to Health Law

By ADAM LIPTAK

The Supreme Court will consider whether the Affordable Care Act allows tax subsidies in those states that did not set up exchanges for people to select their health insurance.
Obama to Send 1,500 More Troops to Assist Iraq

By HELENE COOPER and MICHAEL D. SHEAR

The deployment will double the number of Americans meant to train and advise Iraqi and Kurdish forces as they plan a major offensive against Islamic State fighters who have poured into Iraq from Syria.
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »

Editors' Picks

MAGAZINE

How One Lawyer's Crusade Could Change Football Forever

By MICHAEL SOKOLOVE

The N.F.L. is more popular - and more profitable - than ever. But its coming settlement over brain injuries could lay the groundwork that pushes the sport to the margins of American culture.

OPINION | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

How the Berlin Wall Really Fell

By MARY ELISE SAROTTE

Mistakes by East German officials and rising opposition by large numbers of everyday citizens led to the opening.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY

"I said if you do $100 million, we should give $20 million."
ALBERTO IBARGÜEN of the Knight Foundation, on his comment to a Ford Foundation executive after a judge discreetly asked nonprofits to help Detroit out of bankruptcy.
Today's Videos
Video VIDEO: Building Human Pyramids for Catalonia
Castell competitions in Catalonia feature human pyramids that build community and celebrate culture as the region prepares to hold a straw vote on independence from Spain.
. Related Article
Video VIDEO: Gorillas in the Crossfire
A national park ranger in the Democratic Republic of Congo struggles to protect gorillas from a brutal civil war.
. Related Article
Video VIDEO: Anatomy of a Scene | 'Foxcatcher'
Bennett Miller narrates a sequence from "Foxcatcher," featuring Steve Carell, Channing Tatum and Mark Ruffalo. The film opensNov. 14.
. Related Article
For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »
U.S.
Darren Walker, the president of the Ford Foundation, which pledged $125 million to help Detroit fix its financial affairs.
Finding $816 Million, and Fast, to Save Detroit

By MONICA DAVEY

At the center of Detroit's swift exit from the nation's largest-ever municipal bankruptcy is an improbable arrangement hashed out in many months of behind-the-scenes negotiations.
Construction proceeded Friday on a light-rail transportation project along Woodward Avenue near downtown Detroit.
Plan to Exit Bankruptcy Is Approved for Detroit

By MONICA DAVEY and MARY WILLIAMS WALSH

The decision allows the city to shed $7 billion in debt and to invest about $1.7 billion into long-neglected services after deals were struck with creditors.
. Finding $816 Million, and Fast, to Save Detroit
. 'Grand Bargain' Saves the Detroit Institute of Arts
The Dellwood Lounge, off West Florissant Avenue, whose owners boarded the windows when they heard that insurance would not cover the cost of replacing broken glass.
Ferguson Waits Uneasily for Grand Jury's Decision

By JULIE BOSMAN and MONICA DAVEY

Few in Ferguson, Mo., expect peace when, sometime in the next few weeks, a grand jury decides whether to indict the police officer who shot an unarmed black teenager in August.
Thomas Eric Duncan, the first person to die of Ebola in the United States, was treated in Dallas.

DALLAS JOURNAL

Dallas Closes the Door on Its Ebola Scare

By MANNY FERNANDEZ

The last person in the region being monitored for symptoms of the disease was cleared on Friday.
Former Navy SEAL, Author of Bin Laden Best Seller, May Face Costly Penalties, Lawyer Says

By CHRISTOPHER DREW

Matt Bissonnette, a former SEAL member, will probably forfeit $4.5 million in royalties for failing to let the Pentagon vet his book on the Osama bin Laden raid, his lawyer contends.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »
World
Viktor Orban has been elected prime minister three times, most recently in 2010. He firmly controls the governing party.
Defying Soviets, Then Pulling Hungary to Putin

By RICK LYMAN and ALISON SMALE

After helping topple communism in Eastern Europe in 1989, Prime Minister Victor Orban of Hungary has come to question Western values.
There are competing claims to the islands in the East China Sea known in China as the Diaoyu and in Japan as the Senkaku. Tokyo has controlled the islands since the end of World War II.
China and Japan, in Sign of a Thaw, Agree to Disagree on a Disputed Island Group

By JANE PERLEZ

The countries' leaders gave the first public declaration they are trying to roll back a long standoff that has inflamed nationalist sentiments and damaged economic ties.
Robin Raphe
F.B.I. Is Investigating Retired U.S. Diplomat, a Pakistan Expert, Officials Say

By MARK MAZZETTI and MATT APUZZO

F.B.I. counterintelligence agents have searched the home and office of Robin L. Raphel, a veteran American diplomat, but have not said whether she was a target of their investigation.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »
ADVERTISEMENT
Politics
President Obama met with congressional leaders, including John A. Boehner, the speaker of the House, left, and Senator Mitch McConnell, second from right.
Obama and Congressional Leaders Discuss How to Move on Immigration

By CARL HULSE and MICHAEL D. SHEAR

Speaker John A. Boehner issued a warning to the president, then accepted a gift of a six-pack of White House beer.
Rob Collins, a Republican Party operative, at his office in Washington.
Chastened Republicans Beat Democrats at Their Own Ground Game

By ASHLEY PARKER

The Republican Party took hard lessons from 2012 and built a formidable turnout and digital strategy for the midterm elections - one it hopes will serve it well in 2016.
There was little to celebrate at an election night party in Greensboro, N.C., for Senator Kay Hagan, a Democrat who lost.

POLITICAL MEMO

Democrats Say Economic Message Was Lacking

By JACKIE CALMES

The focus on issues such as those affecting women provided no broader vision to inspire voters to turn out.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »
Business
A health-care career fair in Denver last month. A survey showed that about 683,000 people were hired to new jobs in October.
Jobs Data Show Steady Gains, but Stagnant Wages Temper Optimism

By PATRICIA COHEN

While the report was upbeat, with a survey finding a big increase in the number of people who found a job last month, wage growth continued to drag.
A Simplot storage facility with gene-modified Russet Burbank potatoes, which resist bruising and, when fried, also produce less of a potentially harmful ingredient.
U.S.D.A. Approves Modified Potato. Next Up: French Fry Fans.

By ANDREW POLLACK

The so-called Innate potato, which produces less of a cancer-causing chemical when it is fried, was developed by a major McDonald's supplier.
Senator Claire McCaskill, who heads the product safety subcommittee until Republicans take control of the Senate in January, has called similar hearings this year over General Motors and its defective cars.
Senators Seek Inquiry of Takata Airbag Accusations

By HIROKO TABUCHI and AARON M. KESSLER

The senators were responding to a New York Times article quoting former employees of the company who said Takata discounted airbag safety issues.
. Takata Saw and Hid Risk in Airbags in 2004, Former Workers Say
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »
Technology
International Raids Target Sites Selling Contraband on the 'Dark Web'

By BENJAMIN WEISER and DOREEN CARVAJAL

A joint European and American operation targeted sites that typically operated on the Tor network, which conceals the I.P. addresses of computers.
Ed Park has been a fixture of New York's literary scene for 20 years.
Prominent Editor's Exit Is Setback for Amazon Publishing Unit

By ALEXANDRA ALTER

Ed Park, a novelist who shaped Amazon's sole literary fiction imprint with his taste and connections, is leaving, raising questions about the program's future.
Facebook is giving users more control of the kind of posts they see and from whom.

BITS BLOG

Facebook Makes Its News Feed a Little Less Frustrating

By VINDU GOEL

The social network has made improving its news feed a top priority, and new tools rolled out Friday give users more control over what they see on its main screen.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »
Sports
Kenneth W. Starr restored stability to Baylor, the country's largest Baptist university, after becoming its fifth president in six years.