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Oct 26, 2014

NYT | Today's Headlines - October 26, 2014: U.S. | Paying Till It Hurts: As Insurers Try to Limit Costs, Providers Hit Patients With More Separate Fees.



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Today's Headlines

Sunday, October 26, 2014


Top News
The father of Jejoen Bontinck, a young Belgian who spent three weeks in the same cell as James Foley and other hostages, showed a picture of the prison where they were held.
The Horror Before the Beheadings

By RUKMINI CALLIMACHI

The death of James Foley in August at the hands of Islamic State jihadists in Syria was a very public end to a hidden ordeal shared with nearly two dozen other Westerners.
A nurse who had worked with Ebola patients in West Africa was placed under quarantine at University Hospital shortly after she landed at Newark Liberty International Airport on Friday.
Tested Negative for Ebola, Nurse Criticizes Her Quarantine

By ANEMONA HARTOCOLLIS and EMMA G. FITZSIMMONS

In an essay posted online, Kaci Hickox, who was being quarantined at a New Jersey hospital after working with Ebola patients in Sierra Leone, complained of a "frenzy of disorganization."
Workers at Bellevue in New York on Oct. 8 demonstrated the gear staff members would wear to treat patients with Ebola.
As Ebola Spread in Dallas, New York Honed Protocol

By SABRINA TAVERNISE, ANEMONA HARTOCOLLIS, SHARON LaFRANIERE and ABBY GOODNOUGH

Learning from missteps in the Dallas cases of Ebola, health workers and officials took a different approach in the case of a doctor who fell ill in New York.

Editors' Picks

ARTS

Picasso and His Last Muse

By HILARIE M. SHEETS

An exhibition in New York, will display works by Picasso that were inspired by Jacqueline Roque, with whom he lived from 1954 until his death in 1973.

OPINION | OPINION

Can Video Games Survive?

By CHRIS SUELLENTROP

The future of video games is threatened by the ugly culture around them.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY

"How can this happen? Who takes your money before they prove that you've done anything wrong with it?"
CAROLE HINDERS, who runs a small, cash-only Mexican restaurant in Iowa, and had made regular deposits at a nearby bank, until the Internal Revenue Service seized her funds.
Today's Videos
Video VIDEO: Bill Cunningham | Paying Respects
Is there an appropriate code of dress for memorial services today?
. Related Article
Video VIDEO: Living City | Rebuilding After Sandy
Two years after Hurricane Sandy flooded tunnels and the subway system, New York's infrastructure is still recovering.
For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »
World
Oil Gives Kurds a Path to Independence, and Conflict With Baghdad

By AZAM AHMED and CLIFFORD KRAUSS

Kurdish officials are desperately trying to sell oil abroad, even as the Iraqi government and the United States are blocking their attempts.
President Dilma Rousseff during a campaign rally in Porto Alegre, Brazil, on Saturday.
As Brazil's Presidential Race Draws to Close, Voters Lament Its Ugliness

By SIMON ROMERO

Many Brazilians have been stunned by what may be the country's most contentious election since the end of military rule.
At the United Nations last week, Kim Song, center, of the North Korean mission, said reports of human rights abuses in his country were a Western plot.
Coalition Seeks to Send North Korea to International Court Over Rights Abuses

By SOMINI SENGUPTA

Seven months after a groundbreaking report documenting torture and starvation in North Korea, a broad coalition of countries is pushing to refer Pyongyang to the International Criminal Court.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »
U.S.
Carole Hinders at her modest, cash-only Mexican restaurant in Arnolds Park, Iowa. Last year tax agents seized her funds.
Law Lets I.R.S. Seize Accounts on Suspicion, No Crime Required

By SHAILA DEWAN

Using a law designed to help catch drug traffickers, racketeers and terrorists by tracking their cash, the government has gone after run-of-the-mill business owners and wage earners.
Taylor McLamb, left, a regional field director for the North Carolina Republican Party, and Seth Noble, a student volunteer, in Cary, N.C., on Wednesday. Canvassers went door to door, leaving fliers at homes where they received no answer.
For Midterms, Betting on Feet and Good Apps

By ASHLEY PARKER and JONATHAN WEISMAN

In few states has the ground game been as intense as in North Carolina, where both sides are marshaling outside money and advances in data analytics to reach out to voters.
When Juliana Kessler, 15, broke an arm, a clinic required her mother, Laura Gottsman, to agree to pay for a sling if her insurer refused.

PAYING TILL IT HURTS

As Insurers Try to Limit Costs, Providers Hit Patients With More Separate Fees

By ELISABETH ROSENTHAL

As insurers and providers fight over revenue in an era of cost control, patients often find themselves nickel-and-dimed between them.
Politics
When he has left the White House to campaign, President Obama has conceded that he has been
On Campaign Road, Uneasy Democrats Show Obama Their Tail Lights

By JONATHAN MARTIN and JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS

The president's party, bracing for election defeats, is ready to foist the blame on Mr. Obama while Democratic candidates are keeping their distance from him.
Scott Brown, a Republican who moved from Massachusetts to run, spoke at his event in Hudson, N.H., with Mitt Romney.
New Hampshire's Tight Senate Race Keeps Focus on Baggage

By KATHARINE Q. SEELYE

Scott Brown has gained traction in a potentially pivotal Senate race by lashing the Democratic incumbent, Jeanne Shaheen, to President Obama.
From left, Justices Samuel A. Alito Jr., Sonia Sotomayor and Clarence Thomas.
Three Supreme Court Justices Return to Yale

By ADAM LIPTAK

Justices Thomas, Sotomayor and Alito attended reunion weekend at the law school and discussed affirmative action, salsa dancing and spittoons.
Business

IT'S THE ECONOMY

Can You Uber a Burger?

By MATT BUCHANAN

Surge-pricing comes to the restaurant industry.
Nate Morris, chief of Rubicon Global, with recyclable raw materials on the grounds of Somerset Recycling in Kentucky.
Dividing and Conquering the Trash

By DAVID ZAX

Rubicon Global, a waste consultant, finds a lucrative niche in helping its business clients cut their hauling costs, and to recycle whatever they can.
William A. Ackman in his office overlooking Central Park. The hedge fund has had strong returns in a year when many others are just breaking even, but its concentrated bets on a small number of companies give some critics pause.
Bill Ackman and His Hedge Fund, Betting Big

By ALEXANDRA STEVENSON and JULIE CRESWELL

Whether fighting a corporate takeover war or buying a top-of-the-world apartment, the chief of Pershing Square Capital Management doesn't hold back.
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »
Technology
Timothy D. Cook, Apple's chief, announcing its new iPhones last month. He predicts that the company's next three months will be

STRATEGIES

When iPhones Ring, the Economy Listens

By JEFF SOMMER

Beyond serving as Apple's biggest profit center, the iPhone is also a bedrock of consumer spending and the stock market.
Museums Morph Digitally

By STEVE LOHR

Once reluctant to accept the virtual world, institutions are now using interactivity, 3-D imaging and "augmented reality" in displays.
. Special Section: Fine Arts & Exhibits
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »
Sports
Pablo Sandoval, left, after hitting a two-run single for the Giants in the sixth inning. He was one of three Giants who combined to go 7 for 14 with seven runs batted in.

GIANTS 11, ROYALS 4

Giants Rally and Get Even in a Hurry

By DAVID WALDSTEIN

San Francisco scored three times in the sixth and four times in the seventh to defeat the Kansas City Royals in Game 4 of the World Series.
The Royals' Brandon Finnegan entered Game 3 of the World Series in the seventh and registered two outs to protect a one-run lead against the Giants on Friday.

ON BASEBALL

A Unique College Pedigree Within the Royals' Bullpen

By TYLER KEPNER

Brandon Finnegan, the rookie left-hander for the Kansas City Royals, is the first player to appear in the College World Series and the M.L.B. World Series in the same year.
Clara Horowitz Peterson pregnant last November.
For Pregnant Marathoners, Two Endurance Tests

By LINDSAY CROUSE

The top women competing in the New York City Marathon increasingly find ways to accommodate pregnancies and training in their busy schedules.

Arts
Jessica Chastain, Matthew McConaughey and Anne Hathaway star in
Flight Club

By DAVE ITZKOFF

Matthew McConaughey, Anne Hathaway and Jessica Chastain discuss "Interstellar"; its director, Christopher Nolan; and the humor of physicists.