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Oct 5, 2014

GATA | THE GATA DISPATCH - oCTOBER 5, 2014: Technical analysis is little good in manipulated markets..| GoldSeek Radio interviews GATA Chairman Murphy | Robin Bromby in The Australian: Shanghai gold surprise in store. | Interviewed by KWN, Ing sees 'final panic selling stage' in gold.

Technical analysis is little good in manipulated markets, Fitzwilson writes at KWN

Submitted by cpowell on  Sunday, October 5, 2014. Section: Daily Dispatches
Sunday, October 5, 2014
Dear Friend of GATA and Gold:
Fund manager Robert Fitzwilson of the Portola Group, in commentary published at King World News, argues that technical analysis is of little use in markets as manipulated as those of the monetary metals. Fitzwilson also ridicules assertions that there is a glut of oil. His commentary is posted at the KWN blog here:

GoldSeek Radio interviews GATA Chairman Murphy

Submitted by cpowell on Sunday, October 5, 2014.
Sunday, October 5, 2014
GATA Chairman Bill Murphy, interviewed by Chris Waltzek for GoldSeek Radio, discusses the possibility that the Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa could obstruct gold mining. He also discusses the strange rise of open interest in the silver futures market as the price falls. The interview is 12 minutes long and starts at the 50-minute mark at GoldSeek Radio here:

NYT | Today's Headlines - October 5, 2014: Top News: Ebola's Cultural Casualty: Hugs in Hands-On Liberia.

The New York TimesMost Popular | Video | Subscribe: Digital / Home Delivery

Today's Headlines

Sunday, October 5, 2014


Top News
Sunday service at Bridgeway Baptist Church in Monrovia, Liberia, where Ebola has upset an integral part of the culture.
Ebola's Cultural Casualty: Hugs in Hands-On Liberia

By HELENE COOPER

As Ebola ravages West Africa, Liberians are losing an integral part of their culture, in which the double-cheek kiss was once the standard greeting.
Jim Messina, President Obama's former campaign manager, in 2012. He oversees Priorities USA Action, a
Democrats Lean Heavily on PACs in Coordinated Push to Counter G.O.P.

By ASHLEY PARKER and NICHOLAS CONFESSORE

Democrats are more reliant than they have ever been on the very kind of big-money groups they have spent years trying to outlaw.

THIS LAND

A Couple Gaining Independence, and Finding a Bond

By DAN BARRY

After a federal inquiry in Rhode Island turned the workplace of their repetitive jobs upside down, a couple with intellectual disabilities is marrying, learning to budget and adjusting to a new freedom.
. Video  Video: Love and Independence in East Providence
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »
Editors' Picks

WORLD

In Ukraine, Civilians in Crossfire

By ANDREW ROTH

Civilian casualties have soared as separatist rebels with heavy artillery attack the airport in Donetsk and Ukrainian forces respond with often ill-directed fire.

OPINION | SUNDAY REVIEW

Who Are 'We the People'?

By ERIC L. LEWIS

If corporations are legal "persons," why aren't Muslim detainees?

QUOTATION OF THE DAY

"Our youth are being hoodwinked and hijacked by their rhetoric. We cannot just say ISIS is bad. That's not an option. We need an outlet."
OMAR SAQR, 25, the youth coordinator for the Noor Islamic Cultural Center in Dublin, Ohio, describing how the United States needs to combat recruiting efforts of Muslim Americans by the Islamic State.
Today's Video
Video VIDEO: Spouse, and Muse
Illustrators Elisabeth Alba and Scott Murphy often use each other as models for their drawings. That intense study of each others features makes each think about the other in a different way.
Video VIDEO: Ask Well: An Ebola Q. and A.
Donald G. McNeil Jr. answers reader questions about the Ebola virus.
Video VIDEO: What Made Me | April Bloomfield
The renowned chef April Bloomfield recounts her youthful ambition to be a cop and how she worked her way to the top of her field.
. Related Article
For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »
World
Hong Kong Leader's Warning Renews Protesters' Zeal as Crowds Swell

By AUSTIN RAMZY and ALAN WONG

Tens of thousands gathered outside the government headquarters after the territory's leader said "all actions necessary" would be taken to allow government workers to return to work.
. Triad Links to Attack on Protesters Raise Old Questions
. Video  Video: One Week Later
Officers separated an injured man from the crowd Saturday after scuffles in the Mong Kok area.
Scrutinized for Handling of Protests, Police Have Own Troubles

By KEITH BRADSHER

Police officers in Hong Kong spoke of their frustration at bearing the brunt of protesters' anger, and at having their hands tied by government policy.
In Golan, Imagined Risks Become All Too Real

By JODI RUDOREN

The Golan Heights, long Israel's quietest frontier, is now one of its most unpredictable, and residents are training to handle the worst.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »
U.S.
Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson last month at the Noor Islamic Cultural Center in Dublin, Ohio, where he heard grievances from a group of mostly Muslim leaders.
U.S. Is Trying to Counter ISIS' Efforts to Lure Alienated Young Muslims

By ERIC SCHMITT

The Obama administration is trying to stanch the flow of radicalized young Muslim Americans traveling to Syria to join Islamic State fighters.
As U.S. Ebola Fears Widen, Reports of Possible Cases Grow

By MANNY FERNANDEZ and ROBERT PEAR

Federal officials have assessed more than 100 potential cases, but the only confirmed case is in Dallas, where the condition of the man with Ebola was changed to critical.
. Retracing the Steps of the Dallas Ebola Patient
A statue of the author, with a raven, near the Boston Common.
Edgar Allan Poe's Feud With Boston? Nevermore

By KATHARINE Q. SEELYE

The author who mocked the Frog Pond will join Boston's literary big fish with the unveiling of a statue in the city.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »

Politics
Biden Apologizes to Turkish President

By SEBNEM ARSU

Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. apologized to President Recep Tayyip Erdogan for remarks suggesting that Turkey helped facilitate the rise of the Islamic State.
A couple from Washington, married in Toronto in 2006, learning in June 2013 that the Supreme Court had struck down the Defense of Marriage Act. This term offers justices a chance to decide whether same-sex marriage is a constitutional right.
Supreme Court's Robust New Session Could Define Legacy of Chief Justice

By ADAM LIPTAK

Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. is entering his 10th term, and it is one that could define the legacy of the court he leads.
Caught in a political crossfire, nearly nine in 10 Washington State public schools, including some high-achieving campuses, have been relegated to a federal blacklist of failure.
In Washington State, Political Stand Puts Schools in a Bind

By MOTOKO RICH

The state refuses to base teacher evaluations on student scores, which triggers an outdated standard: that every student be proficient in reading and math.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »
Business
An electronic ticker at a Bank of America branch in New York carried grim tidings about A.I.G. and Lehman Brothers on Sept. 15, 2008.

THE UPSHOT

Six Years Later, We're Still Litigating the Bailouts. Here's What We Know.

By NEIL IRWIN

America remains deeply conflicted about federal regulators' crisis response.
Bernard Arnault is the billionaire leader of LVMH and an avid art collector.
For the Wolf of Luxury, a Chance to Be a Lamb

By VANESSA FRIEDMAN

With a new art museum and performance space, Bernard Arnault and LVMH are offering Paris a big gift - one that also has implications for the giver.
A giant new Amazon distribution center is opening outside Poznan, in western Poland.
With Robust Economy, Poland Navigates Around Eastern Europe's Strains

By RICK LYMAN

With Russia again seeking to exert its influence and much of Europe struggling to recover fully from the deep downturn of recent years, Poland has become a leading symbol of stability.
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »
Technology
A 2009 model Pontiac G8.
Ignition Defect Again Prompts Recalls From G.M.

By CHRISTOPHER JENSEN

General Motors announced three more recalls on Saturday, pushing the company's total to more than 26.4 million vehicles recalled this year in the United States.

TECHNOPHORIA

Just the Facts? This Dossier Goes Further

By NATASHA SINGER

A company starts with data it compiles on journalists, then makes its own suppositions in its profiles of them.

THE WORKOLOGIST

When Your Ex-Boss Haunts Twitter

By ROB WALKER

A reader who followed an ex-supervisor on Twitter and Instagram asks the Workologist how to break those ties.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »
Sports
Brandon Belt was 0 for 6 before his 18th-inning homer, which helped the Giants take a 2-0 series lead.

GIANTS 2, NATIONALS 1, 18 INNINGS

18 Innings, Six Hours, One Huge Win for the Giants

By TIM ROHAN

Brandon Belt's home run lifted San Francisco past Washington in the longest game by time - 6 hours 23 minutes - in major league postseason history.
Matt Kemp led off the bottom of the eighth inning with a solo home run that gave the Dodgers the lead.

DODGERS 3, CARDINALS 2

Kemp and Greinke Help Dodgers Even Series With Cardinals

By TYLER KEPNER

Zack Greinke buzzed through the seventh with a shutout intact, and Matt Kemp, who missed Los Angeles's N.L.C.S. loss to St. Louis last year, hit a tiebreaking homer in the eighth.
Andrea Cavaco taught a version of a school board's concussion course to sixth graders.
Canadian District Goes to School on Concussions

By JEFF Z. KLEIN

A school district near Toronto has begun a program to teach students about the risks of traumatic brain injuries in sports.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »
Arts
The New York City Ballet principal Wendy Whelan in her dressing room at Lincoln Center.
Muse Steps Away

By ROSLYN SULCAS

Wendy Whelan, a principal dancer with New York City Ballet, will give her farewell performance on Oct. 18.
Jean-Pierre Dardenne, left, and Luc Dardenne.