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Sep 13, 2014

NYT | Today's Headlines - September 13, 2014: Top News: Nations Trying to Stop Their Citizens From Going to Middle East to Fight for ISIS

The New York TimesMost Popular | Video 

Today's Headlines

Saturday, September 13, 2014


Top News
Nations Trying to Stop Their Citizens From Going to Middle East to Fight for ISIS

By SOMINI SENGUPTA

Lawmakers around the world are debating laws intended to stop citizens from going abroad to fight, and to punish them if they do.
A woman in Monrovia, Liberia, passed a man believed to be infected with Ebola. Researchers say it could take 12 to 18 months to bring the epidemic under control.
U.S. Scientists See Long Fight Against Ebola

By DENISE GRADY

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa is likely to last 12 to 18 months more and could infect hundreds of thousands, say scientists mapping its spread for the American government.
Kevin Turner, a former N.F.L. player who has amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, has supported a settlement with the league.
Brain Trauma to Affect One in Three Players, N.F.L. Agrees

By KEN BELSON

The statements are the league's most unvarnished admission yet that the sport's professional participants sustain severe brain injuries at far higher rates than the general population.
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »
Editors' Picks
The Rev. Ian Paisley, a Protestant rabble-rouser in Northern Ireland, in 1981. Once a force behind the Troubles, he agreed in 2007 to end the strife.

WORLD

Ian Paisley Dies at 88; Longtime Voice of Hard-Line Ulster Who Then Made Peace

By ROBERT D. McFADDEN

The Protestant leader who vowed never to compromise with Irish Catholic nationalists accepted in his twilight a power-sharing agreement after decades of sectarian violence.
RECOMMENDED FOR YOU
OPINION | What We’re Afraid to Say About Ebola
WORLD | A Trial Concludes, but for South Africans, the Debate May Be Just Starting
SPORTS | N.F.L. Rocked Again as Adrian Peterson Faces a Child Abuse Charge

QUOTATION OF THE DAY

"We hope we're wrong."
BRYAN LEWIS, an epidemiologist at the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute at Virginia Tech, who worked on calculations to project the extent of the Ebola crisis.
Today's Video
Video VIDEO: Stopping Home-Bound ISIS Fighters
A look at how governments around the world deal with their citizens who become jihadists.
. Related Article
Video VIDEO: Stacked With Warrants
In Ferguson, Mo., a neighbor of Michael Brown's family tries to clear various warrants for his arrest so he can participate in civil disobedience.
. Related Article
Video VIDEO: Sweet and Spicy Roast Chicken
Melissa Clark roasts juicy chicken thighs with carrots, onions and dates for a twist on a classic dish for the Jewish holidays.
. Related Article
For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »
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World
Liberian President Pleads With Obama for Assistance in Combating Ebola

By HELENE COOPER

Liberia's president, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, warned that without American assistance, the Ebola epidemic could send the country into the civil chaos that enveloped it for two decades.
Distributing relief goods in Srinagar, Kashmir, on Friday. With telecommunications largely knocked out, social media has helped rescuers locate people.
Embrace of Social Media Aids Flood Victims in Kashmir

By NIDA NAJAR and ELLEN BARRY

Social media companies, government agencies and still-connected individuals have cooperated to help locate some 12,000 people amid the flooding and communications difficulties.
U.S. and European Sanctions Take Aim at Putin's Economic Efforts

By PETER BAKER and ANDREW HIGGINS

The measures take aim at financial, defense and industrial companies at the vanguard of a push by the Russian leader to replace wild free-market capitalism with state-led development.
. U.S. and Europe Back New Economic Sanctions Against Russia
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »
U.S.
Representative Gary Peters of Michigan on a tour of Hop Head Farms, a hop farm located in Hickory Corners, Mich. Economic recovery taking root in Michigan - among the states hit hardest by the 2008 recession - has not translated into an improved political environment for officials in either party.
A Rebound Takes Root in Michigan, but Voters' Gloom Is Hard to Shake

By JONATHAN WEISMAN

No state has seen stronger gains in employment since the recession, but the recovery has proved to be something of an abstraction to voters.
Katrina Clemons and her husband, Grover, are among the nearly 12,000 people with pending arrest warrants in Ferguson.
Mistrust Lingers as Ferguson Takes New Tack on Fines

By FRANCES ROBLES

The trust level was not high in court and at the police clerk's window in Ferguson, Mo., this week as municipal penalties were scaled back in an effort to repair the city's frayed relationship with the black community.
Federal Appeals Court Permits Wisconsin Voter ID Law

By MONICA DAVEY

The order was a blow to opponents of such requirements, who had been heartened by a lower court's finding that the law had abridged citizens' right to vote.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »

Politics
Secretary of State John Kerry, second from right, met with President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey, left, in Ankara on Friday.
Iran's Participation in Meeting to Aid Iraq Is 'Not Appropriate,' Says Kerry

By MICHAEL R. GORDON

The French hosts of a meeting to coordinate assistance to the Iraqi fight against Islamist militants have not ruled out Iran's attendance, but the United States is arguing against the country's inclusion.
Hillary Rodham Clinton's schedule included a tribute to Maya Angelou on Friday in New York.
Clinton Silent on 2016 Bid as Campaign-Style Actions Begin to Speak Volumes

By AMY CHOZICK

Hillary Rodham Clinton has said that she will decide early next year whether she will undertake a campaign for the presidency. But inside the Clinton operation, the groundwork is already quietly being laid for a candidacy.
Mark Sanford
Mark Sanford Announces a Breakup on Facebook

By ALAN RAPPEPORT

Representative Mark Sanford of South Carolina turned to Facebook on Friday to announce he had ended his engagement to the Argentine woman he once called his soul mate.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »
Business
The La Perla is a slum in the heart of the tourist district of Old San Juan. Outside companies are investing huge sums in Puerto Rican debt and working to improve its image. 

DEALBOOK

Puerto Rico Finds It Has New Friends in Hedge Funds

By MICHAEL CORKERY

Hedge fund firms and investors have bought about 10 percent of all Puerto Rico government bonds, and have offered to help the government in expectation of a big return on their investment.
Exxon's Stephen Greenlee, left; Igor Sechin, right, head of Rosneft; and Vladimir Putin, rear.
New Sanctions to Stall Exxon's Arctic Oil Plans

By STANLEY REED and CLIFFORD KRAUSS

The United States government took aim at Exxon's project in the Arctic Ocean, ordering American companies to cut off exports to Russian oil exploration within 14 days.
Hackers may potentially have a window into how the bank's individual computers work, people said.
After Breach, JPMorgan Still Seeks to Determine Extent of Attack

By NICOLE PERLROTH and MATTHEW GOLDSTEIN

Over two months, hackers gained entry to dozens of the bank's servers, said three people with knowledge of the bank's investigation into the episode.
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »
Technology
The government threatened to fine Yahoo $250,000 a day if it did not immediately comply with a secret court order.
Government Push for Yahoo's User Data Set Stage for Broad Surveillance

By VINDU GOEL

Documents from the case paint a vivid portrait of the high-stakes battle that pitted Yahoo against some top officials in the Bush administration over what was legitimate gathering of foreign intelligence and what was illegal snooping.

BITS BLOG

Square to Raise $100 Million at a $6 Billion Valuation

By MIKE ISAAC

The funding comes after a difficult year for Square, a five-year-old company that has appeared to shift its strategy.
Peter Theil is a co-founder of PayPal and Palantir, a data analysis company.

BITS BLOG

A Conversation With Peter Thiel

By QUENTIN HARDY

The PayPal co-founder turned venture capitalist has a new book coming it. And with it, one of Silicon Valley's most outspoken leaders explains why he so often tries to get people to see the world through a different lens.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »
Sports
The athlete Oscar Pistorius was convicted on Friday in a killing, but questions of fairness remain among South Africans.
A Trial Concludes, but for South Africans, the Debate May Be Just Starting

By SARAH LYALL and ALAN COWELL

Oscar Pistorius was found guilty of a charge equivalent to manslaughter in the shooting of Reeva Steenkamp, but he was granted bail and will remain free until sentencing procedures on Oct. 13.
Vikings running back Adrian Peterson was the N.F.L.'s most valuable player in 2012.
N.F.L. Rocked Again as Adrian Peterson Faces a Child Abuse Charge

By STEVE EDER and PAT BORZI

Peterson, a star running back for the Minnesota Vikings, has been charged in a child abuse inquiry in Montgomery County, Tex., involving his son.
Ray Rice Case Highlights a Crime Often Obscured

By DAVID KOCIENIEWSKI

Violent domestic assaults rarely lead to jail time or serious legal consequences, but a renewed focus on the issue could bring stricter rules.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »
Arts
Jeff Goldblum at the Café Carlyle, where his jazz band, the Mildred Snitzer Orchestra, will play beginning on Tuesday night.
Playing Piano, and Blaming Woody Allen

By DAVE ITZKOFF

Jeff Goldblum, leader of the Mildred Snitzer Orchestra, opening at the Café Carlyle on Tuesday, says he could have seen himself as a full-time musician rather than an actor.
Carnegie Hall has completed a major renovation, which has created 24 ensemble and practice rooms in the towers that used to house artist studios.
Carnegie Hall Makes Room for Future Stars

By MICHAEL COOPER

Carnegie Hall is ready to unveil its new education wing and roof terrace, with the completion of its $230 million renovation.
Europeans Bracing for Netflix

By DOREEN CARVAJAL

As Netflix prepares to start streaming in six European countries next week, some politicians and rival businesses there are assailing the company over issues like competition and taxes.
For more arts news, go to