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Sep 6, 2014

YouTube | RT has uploaded NATO summit push alliance East in tough stance on Russia -September 6, 2014-.



RT has uploaded NATO summit push alliance East in tough stance on Russia

NATO summit push alliance East in tough stance on Russia
RT


Published on Sep 6, 2014
Russia's Foreign ministry says the announcement the bloc will hold military drills with Ukraine will only increase tensions. The decision was made public at the NATO summit in Wales, where the alliance also agreed to create a rapid reaction force for Eastern Europe, made up of thousands of troops. RT's Harry Fear reports.

Bloomberg | Share The View - September 6, 2014: Where Have the Jobs Gone?

Share The View
THE LATEST OPINIONS FROM BLOOMBERG VIEW

SEPTEMBER 6, 2014bloombergview.com

U.S. ECONOMY
The Editors: The latest jobs report, "which showed nonfarm payrolls increasing by a meager 142,000 jobs and the unemployment rate falling 0.1 percentage point to 6.1 percent in August, will undoubtedly rekindle a familiar debate: How much more should the Federal Reserve do to put people back to work?" Read more..

NYT | Today's Headlines - September 6, 2014: Obama Enlists 9 Allies to Help in the Battle Against ISIS

The New York TimesMost Popular | Video 

Today's Headlines

Saturday, September 6, 2014


Top News
Obama Enlists 9 Allies to Help in the Battle Against ISIS

By HELENE COOPER

President Obama escalated the U.S. response to the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria on Friday, recruiting at least nine allies to help crush the organization and offering the outlines of a strategy that echoes the war on terror.
Militiamen who oppose the separatists gathered on the outskirts of Mariupol, Ukraine, after a cease-fire was announced Friday.
Ukraine Deal Imposes Truce Putin Devised

By NEIL MacFARQUHAR

Whether the cease-fire between Ukraine's government and separatists lasts will probably be determined by the outcome of negotiations over the political future of the southeastern region.
. On Ukraine, West Sidesteps a Fraught Term: 'Invasion'
People believed to have contracted Ebola, or been exposed to it, waited outside a treatment center in Monrovia, Liberia, on Friday.
Ebola Is Taking a Second Toll, on Economies

By ADAM NOSSITER

The disease, and the hysteria it has caused, is already having a serious economic impact, in part because some countries are closing down borders.
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »
Editors' Picks

U.S.

Wary 'Normal' in Ferguson, Mo.

By TODD HEISLER

After the killing of a black teenager by a white police officer sparked a string of protests in Ferguson, Mo., the town is returning to a new normal as scars of the unrest remain.

OPINION | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

Atlantic City's Next Gamble

By NELSON JOHNSON

Lessons from the boss of the original boardwalk empire.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY

"If I go back to Honduras, it is certain death."
HEIDY LARA CARBALLO, a young Honduran woman told an immigration judge in her successful bid to remain in the United States.
Today's Video
Video VIDEO: Players in the Coalition Against ISIS
The Obama administration is now leading a coalition of nations to fight the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria.
Video VIDEO: This Week's Movies | Sept. 5, 2014
The New York Times film critics review "The Congress," "Kelly & Cal" and "Last Days In Vietnam."
Alibaba, the Chinese e-commerce behemoth, said its profit nearly tripled in the quarter ended June 30, to $2 billion.
Video VIDEO: What Is Alibaba?
Alibaba, China's largest e-commerce company, is preparing to go public in New York, setting up expectations for the biggest stock market debut in United States history.
For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »
ADVERTISEMENT
World
Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany with President François Hollande of France.
NATO Plans a Special Force to Reassure Eastern Europe and Deter Russia

By STEVEN ERLANGER, JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS and STEPHEN CASTLE

The decision to form the force was meant to send a message to Russia that NATO's principle of collective security is sacrosanct.
Strikes Killed Militant Chief in Somalia, U.S. Reports

By HELENE COOPER, ERIC SCHMITT and JEFFREY GETTLEMAN

The Pentagon said it had confirmed that airstrikes Monday killed the leader of the Shabab, the Somalia militant network affiliated with Al Qaeda.
Jet Carrying Contractors Is Ordered to Land in Iran

By PETER BAKER and ERIC SCHMITT

The United States attributed the episode to a bureaucratic issue and not a larger political incident. The plane was later allowed to depart Iran, and by Friday night, had landed in Dubai, officials said.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »
U.S.
Volunteer lawyers prepared to represent women and children caught crossing the border illegally and being held in Artesia, N.M.
In Remote Detention Center, a Battle on Fast Deportations

By JULIA PRESTON

A corps of volunteers is changing the nature and purpose of a temporary outpost that the Obama administration set up to hold illegal immigrants briefly until they could be deported.
Senator Mary L. Landrieu is registered to vote at a home in New Orleans. A lawsuit said she lived in Washington full time.
Louisiana Judge Rejects Suit Over Landrieu's Residency

By JEREMY ALFORD

A state district judge on Friday threw out a lawsuit claiming that Senator Mary L. Landrieu lives full time in Washington and cannot represent Louisiana, saying it was premature.
Bishop Francis Kalabat of Mother of God Chaldean Catholic Church in Southfield, Mich., wants help for Chaldeans in Iraq, whose churches have been destroyed and monasteries attacked.

ON RELIGION

As Iraqi Christians in U.S. Watch ISIS Advance, They See 'Slow-Motion Genocide'

By SAMUEL G. FREEDMAN

Worshipers at the Mother of God Chaldean Catholic Church in Southfield, Mich., have been trying desperately to raise awareness about persecution in their home country.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »
Politics
Former Gov. Bob McDonnell arriving at the courthouse in Richmond, Va., on Wednesday. The following day, a jury found him and his wife, Maureen, guilty on a combined 20 counts.
Virginians, Surprised by Ex-Governor's Conviction, Ponder the Fallout

By TRIP GABRIEL

Politicians consider new ethics rules in a state with notoriously lax ones and the possible consequences if state legislators do not substantially limit gifts public officials can receive.
Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey visited a school in Puebla, Mexico, on Friday. Many of his stops seemed to have been picked for their cinematic backdrop.
Christie's Trip Looks Like a Campaign for President

By MICHAEL BARBARO

The tour of Mexico by Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey has some of the trappings of a presidential campaign, with local traffic stopping for his motorcade, with aides enforcing protocol and with efforts to put the governor in the best possible light.
. Video  Video: Christie Addresses Trade in Mexico
Vincent A. Cianci Jr., a former two-term mayor of Providence, R.I., who served more than four years in federal prison, is running again as an independent.
Candidate Not on Providence Primary Ballot Stirs Mayoral Field

By JESS BIDGOOD

With signature bombast and zeal, Vincent A. Cianci Jr. has exerted outsize influence as candidates scrambled to avoid indirectly helping him by splitting the vote.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »
Business
Alibaba, the Chinese e-commerce behemoth, said its profit nearly tripled in the quarter ended June 30, to $2 billion.

DEALBOOK

As Its Initial Offering Nears, Alibaba Gets Ready for a Splashy Debut

By MICHAEL J. DE LA MERCED

The company, which runs two huge online marketplaces in China, plans to kick off a long-awaited roadshow for potential investors on Monday.
Laid-off casino workers fill out claims for unemployment insurance in Atlantic City.
Job Growth Is Sluggish, Raising Fear of Malaise

By NELSON D. SCHWARTZ

With only 142,000 jobs added, August was the first month since January in which the economy failed to add at least 200,000 jobs. Unemployment fell slightly to 6.1 percent.
. The Upshot: Not Good, Not Terrible Either
Lucy H. Koh is a judge in U.S. District Court in California.
Silicon Valley Fights Order to Pay Bigger Settlement in Hiring Case

By DAVID STREITFELD

Google, Apple, Intel and Adobe filed papers asking the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals to spurn Judge Lucy H. Koh's rejection of their $324.5 million antitrust settlement as too meager.
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »
Technology
A Kansas City, Mo., home. Kansas City and the similarly named city in Kansas won a national competition to be the first places to get Google Fiber.  The service is a fiber-optic network that includes cable television and Internet running at one gigabit a second.
Two Cities With Blazing Internet Speed Search for a Killer App

By CONOR DOUGHERTY

Both Kansas City, Mo., and Kansas City, Kan., have Google Fiber, a high-speed fiber-optic network, and are having a hard time figuring out what to do with so much power.

BITS | STATE OF THE ART

Taking a Naked Selfie? Your Phone Should Step In to Protect You

By FARHAD MANJOO

Our phones don't do nearly enough to protect our most sensitive documents: indelicate photos of ourselves.
  Bill Gates, right, with David Christian, a professor from Australia with a new approach to teaching history.
So Bill Gates Has This Idea for a History Class ...

By ANDREW ROSS SORKIN

Should one of the world's richest men get to dictate the future of how we learn about our past?
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »
Sports
Peng Shuai was treated and left the court in a wheelchair after she was overcome a second time during her match against Caroline Wozniacki.
A Scare and a Disheartening Victory

By LYNN ZINSER

Wozniacki beat Peng in a semifinal match when Peng retired because of a heat-related illness with the score, 7-6 (1), 4-3. Wozniacki will face Serena Williams in the final.
Serena Williams will meet Caroline Wozniacki on Sunday in the women's final after cruising past Ekaterina Makarova in the other semifinal match.

ON TENNIS

Focused Ferocity by Serena Williams on a Stage She Owns at the U.S. Open

By CHRISTOPHER CLAREY

Having won her semifinal against Ekaterina Makarova in one hour at Arthur Ashe Stadium, Williams is poised to win her third U.S. Open title in a row.
Brandon Steiner, the founder of Steiner Sports Marketing, in a grounds-crew room at Yankee Stadium in July.
The Man Who Spins Pinstripes Into Gold

By RICHARD SANDOMIR

Brandon Steiner has been a force in the sports memorabilia business since the early 1990s, and he is a key figure in the selling of Derek Jeter's final season with the Yankees.
. Photographs  Slide Show: The King of Collectibles
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »
Arts
A 1954 self-portrait by Vivian Maier, whose art has become heralded since her death in 2009.
The Heir's Not Apparent

By RANDY KENNEDY

A legal battle over the work of the photographer Vivian Maier could hide it away for years.
Franz Welser-Möst's departure leaves one of the most prestigious posts in the opera world empty.
Vienna State Opera's Music Director Resigns

By MICHAEL COOPER and REBECCA SCHMID

The general music director, Franz Welser-Möst, cited "irreconcilable differences" for his decision and withdrew from all his scheduled performances there.
Johnny O'Neal, at rear, performing at Mezzrow, a new basement jazz piano room on West 10th Street in Greenwich Village.
...