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Sep 1, 2014

Factory activity in Europe, Asia cools; demand lull a concern




Factory activity in Europe, Asia cools; demand lull a concern
BANGALORE/SYDNEY (Reuters) - Factory activity in Europe and Asia cooled in August after a strong July, as new orders dwindled in the face of escalating tensions in Ukraine and a patchy recovery in China, purchasing managers indexes showed.

YouTube | VOAvideo has uploaded Internet, Technology Offer New Tools for Journalists - September 1, 2014-.



VOAvideo has uploaded Internet, Technology Offer New Tools for Journalists




Internet, Technology Offer New Tools for Journalists
VOAvideo
The Internet and rapidly evolving technology is quickly changing how people receive news and how journalists deliver it. There are now more ways to tell a story than ever before. One school in Los Angeles is teaching the next generation of journalists with the help of a state-of-the-art newsroom. Elizabeth Lee has this report.
Originally published at - http://www.voanews.com/media/video/2434798.html

YouTube | RT has uploaded ISIS just like Taliban with oil.



RT has uploaded ISIS just like Taliban with oil

ISIS just like Taliban with oil
RT
Watch the full Keiser Report Episode 648 on Tuesday!

In this episode of the Keiser Report, Max Keiser and Stacy Herbert discuss the Islamic State resembling the Taliban with oil fields - ie a whole lot like Oklahoma. They also discuss the new Misery Index, which shows labor force participation and velocity of money plunging. Meanwhile, back in America naked incidents are on the rise and, in Europe, suicide tourism rises four-fold. In the second half, Max continues his interview of bitcoin mogul, Trace Mayer, about bitcoin, central banking and geopolitics.

NYT | Today's Headlines - September 1, 2014: Top News: China Restricts Voting Reforms for Hong Kong.

The New York TimesMost Popular | Video | 

Today's Headlines

Monday, September 1, 2014


Top News
Protesters switched on their cellphones at a rally in Hong Kong on Sunday night after China curbed election reforms in the city.
China Restricts Voting Reforms for Hong Kong

By CHRIS BUCKLEY and MICHAEL FORSYTHE

China's legislature laid down strict limits to proposed voting reforms in Hong Kong, drawing battle lines in what could be a deepening confrontation over the future of the city and of China.
At the prison in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, last month, two detainees in one of the least restrictive sections held a conversation while separated by multiple fences.
Decaying Guantánamo Defies Closing Plans

By CHARLIE SAVAGE

More than 12 years after the Bush administration sent the first prisoners here, tensions are mounting over whether President Obama can close the prison before leaving office.
. Q. and A.: The Future of Guantánamo
.   Interactive Graphic: The Guantanamo Docket
Guadalupe Salazar, a McDonald's cashier who says her paychecks were missing overtime wages.
More Workers Are Claiming 'Wage Theft'

By STEVEN GREENHOUSE

A flood of recent lawsuits and government enforcement actions accuse employers across the country of violating laws regulating employee pay.
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »
Editors' Picks

SPORTS | POSTCARD FROM SARATOGA SPRINGS

And He's Off: A Track Legend Calls It a Career

By JOE DRAPE

Tom Durkin, who called more than 80,000 horse races with an imaginative and captivating style, worked his final race on Sunday at Saratoga Race Course.
. Video  Video: The Voice of Horse Racing in New York
The dogs shied from physical contact with people but would respond with surprised and simpering gratitude if it was offered.

OPINION | OPINIONATOR | MENAGERIE

Sympathy for a Desert Dog

By JAMES SUZMAN

The Ju/'hoansi villagers I lived with communed with animals. So why didn't they grieve for the dog who had befriended me?

QUOTATION OF THE DAY

"It's a long way from being closed."
GEN. JOHN F. KELLY, leader of the United States Southern Command, on the Guantánamo Bay detention center, which still houses 149 inmates.
Today's Video
Video VIDEO: Rallying Conservatives
Americans for Prosperity, a group backed by the Koch brothers, hosted a summit in Dallas ahead of the midterm elections that drew several potential presidential contenders.
. Related Article
Video VIDEO: Chasing Fairy Dust in Jackson Hole
Snowboard legends Jeremy Jones and Bryan Iguchi head into the Jackson Hole backcountry with young snowboarders, Frank Knab and Jimmy Goodman.
Video VIDEO: 2015 Subaru Outback 3.6R Limited
The family-friendly, wildnerness-friendly Subaru Outback continues down the same path with upgraded gear.
For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »
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World
Kurdish pesh merga fighters fire toward positions held by the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria during heavy clashes in Tuz Khurmatu, in northern Iraq, on Sunday.
U.S. and Iran Unlikely Allies in Iraq Battle

By TIM ARANGO and AZAM AHMED

The fight for Amerli appeared to mark the first time American warplanes and militias backed by Iran were working with a common purpose on the battlefield against militants from the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria.
A protester in Islamabad, Pakistan, threw a tear-gas shell back toward the police on Sunday.
Pakistani Army Calls for Calm After Protest Turns Deadly

By SALMAN MASOOD and DECLAN WALSH

At least three people died in clashes with the police when demonstrators, calling for Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif's resignation, marched toward his official residence.
Civilian volunteers dig trenches to help Ukrainian Army soldiers fortify the surroundings of Mariupol in southeastern Ukraine.
Putin Urges 'Statehood' Talks for Eastern Ukraine

By ANDREW ROTH and ANDREW E. KRAMER

In an interview Sunday, President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia veered between veiled threats and demands that the Ukraine government negotiate directly with separatists.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »
U.S.
Kathy MacDonald, left, buying produce from Hillary King at a farmers' market in Fairbanks, Alaska.
In a Tough Place to Farm, Discovering Much to Love

By KIRK JOHNSON

Advocates for local food are pushing back against the notion that eating food grown or raised in Alaska is impossible or too expensive.
A crew on a rig drilling a water well in Pixley, Calif. Farmers in California have turned to such services to unearth water in a time of severe drought. A new law seeks to regulate the activity.
Desperately Dry California Tries to Curb Private Drilling for Water

By FELICITY BARRINGER

Farmers have long believed that landowners controlled groundwater, but the state legislature passed new controls that establish a framework for managing water withdrawals through local agencies.
More than 500 chess players from 39 countries will arrive at the Planet Hollywood Casino in Las Vegas to compete in a tournament in October.
Millionaire Chess to Hit Las Vegas, in Gambit to Raise Game's Profile With Big Prizes

By DYLAN LOEB McCLAIN

The tournament is intended to be the first step in a multiyear plan to organize and run tournaments with big prize funds.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »
Politics
The outcome of the bankruptcy trial will set Detroit's new course for the coming decades.
One Judge to Decide the Future of Detroit

By MONICA DAVEY and MARY WILLIAMS WALSH

In a trial set to open on Tuesday, nothing short of this city's future is at stake, with a judge to decide whether to approve a blueprint to eliminate more than $7 billion of its estimated $18 billion in debts.
Damage from battles between militias was observed Sunday outside a building at the evacuated United States Embassy compound in Tripoli, Libya.
Libyans Overrun Compound Abandoned by U.S. Embassy in Tripoli

By DAVID D. KIRKPATRICK

A video circulating online Sunday showed gleeful trespassers diving off a balcony into a pool in the residential compound abandoned by the American Embassy when it pulled out of Tripoli in July.
Tim Wu, a Columbia law professor, is waging a shoestring campaign for lieutenant governor.
Inspired by His Father's Activism, Tim Wu Is Running for Lieutenant Governor as an Outsider

By DAVID W. CHEN

Mr. Wu, a Columbia law professor who is an expert in Internet law and policy, has waged a shoestring anti-establishment campaign in the Democratic primary.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »
Business
Russia hosted the Winter Olympics this year in Sochi.
P.R. Firm for Putin's Russia Now Walking a Fine Line

By RAVI SOMAIYA

Ketchum's staff members who provide public relations advice to Russia must avoid being seen as defending acts contrary to American interests while still providing some luster for a lucrative client.
Kale in Coulommiers, France. There is no shortage in kale, though almonds are in tight supply.
The Hot Pursuit of Kale and Its Trendy Friends, and Rumors of Shortages

By STEPHANIE STROM

Kale is fine, quinoa is tight, chia is in demand and a finicky grower. But the real shortage may be in an old favorite, the almond.

DEALBOOK

Barclays to Sell Retail and Corporate Bank Units to CaixaBank of Spain

By NEIL GOUGH

The sale represents the latest development in the British bank's plan to streamline itself by selling noncore businesses.
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »
Technology
Anders Fogh Rasmussen, the NATO secretary general, said the pact was a start,
NATO Set to Ratify Pledge on Joint Defense in Case of Major Cyberattack

By DAVID E. SANGER

For the first time, a cyberattack on any of the 28 NATO nations could be declared an attack on all of them, much like a ground invasion or an airborne bombing.
An aerial view of this year's Burning Man, an annual gathering in the Nevada desert.

BITS BLOG

San Francisco Exhales During 'Burning Man Exodus'

By CONOR DOUGHERTY

The event draws more than 50,000 people, many of whom are from the tech industry. And while they're away, the city's hard-to-get-into restaurants and bars aren't so hard to get into.
Lawrence Coburn said concerns about a possible downturn were a factor in his decision to raise $19 million of equity and debt financing for his events app, DoubleDutch.

DEALBOOK

Start-Ups Accrue Funding in Case of Leaner Times

By WILLIAM ALDEN

Some entrepreneurs say worries about a possible downturn are partly why they are stocking up on financing, essentially taking out insurance on the risk of harder days ahead.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »
Sports
Play at Flushing Meadows on Sunday was suspended for about two hours by a thunderstorm, the first rain of the U.S. Open.
Men's Draw Has Its First Major Surprise, and Event Has Its First Rain

By NAILA-JEAN MEYERS

Gilles Simon, seeded 26th, defeated fourth-seeded David Ferrer to become the first man at this United States Open to send a top-10 seed home, on a day when rain suspended play for about two hours.
Monica Niculescu on Thursday. Niculescu's forehand is almost always a slice.
With Power Ruling the Game, Monica Niculescu's Slicing Forehand Stands Out at the U.S. Open

By BEN ROTHENBERG

Niculescu's forehand shot is usually a slice, a rare strategy that has had mixed success, but often takes opponents by surprise.
Tony Stewart before the Oral-B USA 500, his first race since his involvement in a track fatality Aug. 9.
Tony Stewart's Return to Sprint Cup Series Ends With Blowout

By MIKE TIERNEY

Stewart crashed into a barrier and blew a tire in his return to Nascar competition Sunday. He had taken a three-week hiatus from racing after his car fatally struck a fellow driver at a short-track event.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »
Arts
Keith A. Fisher, chief operating officer of the San Diego Opera.
Amid Choruses of Despair, an Aria of Hope

By ADAM NAGOURNEY

After a near collapse, the San Diego Opera is engaging in a rescue mission, hoping to prove that opera can still thrive not only in San Diego but across the country.
The Australian duo Nervo performed on Saturday during Electric Zoo.
A Bit of Caution Beneath the Thump

By JON PARELES

The Electric Zoo Festival, the annual electronic dance music gathering, took over Randalls Island a year after two festivalgoers died after using the synthetic party drug Molly.

Asian and European Markets at Close Report - September 1, 2014: Europe stocks notch gain; Ukraine-Russia tensions heat up | Hong Kong stocks swung between gains and losses, Closing Mixed

European Markets

By

CARLAMOZEE

MARKETS REPORTER
LONDON (MarketWatch) — European markets sloughed off losses Monday in a seesaw trading session during which Russia’s foreign minister said Moscow will defend the economy if it comes up against another round of sanctions related to the conflict in Ukraine.
Any new measures from the European Union or the United States will force Russia to “protect our economy, protect our social sphere, protect our businesses and at the same time draw conclusions from the actions of our partners on their adequacy,” Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov was quoted by Reuters as saying Monday.
On Saturday, EU leaders agreed to draw up options for new sanctions within a week if Russia doesn’t pull back its intervention in Ukraine. Read: Ukraine loses ground to rebels.
The comments came as Pro-Russian rebels and Ukrainian forces were fighting near the Luhansk airport in eastern Ukraine on Monday, according to the BBC, with the battles talking place before new round of Russia-Ukraine talks was set to begin. Lavrov said negotiators should prioritize an “immediate cease-fire” when they meet in Minsk to talk about the months-long conflict. On Saturday, Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko said his country was moving toward “a point of no return — full-scale war” against Russia.
Market reaction: The Stoxx Europe 600 SXXP, +0.25%  had turned lower after Lavrov’s remarks about sanctions, but then bounced back to end with a gain of 0.3% at 342.86. Germany’s DAX 30 index DAX, +0.09% had been lower as well, but ended the day up 0.1% at 9,479.03. German stocks in recent weeks have felt the weight of worry among investors about the German economy and the impact of sanctions on trading partner Russia.
Trading volumes in European markets were lighter than usual, with U.S. markets closed for the Labor Day holiday.
Russia’s blue-chip MICEX index XX:MCX  finished 0.6% lower at 1,392.40, while theRussian ruble reached a record low against the U.S. dollar, according to The Wall Street Journal. The greenback USDRUB, +0.65%  late Monday bought 37.2702 rubles, compared with 37.1605 rubles on Friday.
France’s CAC 40 index PX1, -0.03% fell less than 2 points to 4,379.73, while the yield on France’s 2-year bond TMBMKFR-02Y, -58.06%  turned negative for the first time.
The U.K.’s FTSE 100 UKX, +0.08% closed up 0.1% at 6,825.31, but Tesco PLCTSCO, -1.91%  shares continued to lose ground after Friday’s profit warning. Read more about Europe’s notable stock moves here.
Economic data: Germany received downbeat, though expected, confirmation that its economy shrank in the second quarter. Gross domestic product contracted 0.2% on adjusted terms after growth of 0.7% in the first quarter, according to figures from government agency Destatis.
Meanwhile, a report from Markit showed German factories in August logged their most sluggish month since September 2013. The figures were part of a headline measure that showed activity in the euro zone’s manufacturing sector fell to 50.7 from 51.8 in July. The final activity reading was slightly lower than the preliminary estimate of 50.8.
The euro EURUSD, +0.02% was little changed after the euro-zone economic data, trading around $1.3136. But it was down from Friday’s level of around $1.3170.  
Comments: “Russia’s escalation of the conflict in Ukraine has taken a toll on the internationally exposed manufacturing sector, and that effect could yet worsen further in the coming months, given recent confidence drops in the more directly exposed core European economies,” said Robert Wood, chief U.K. economist at Berenberg, in note about a slowdown in the U.K. manufacturing sector. Data from Markit/CIPS released Monday showed the sector expanded at the slowest pace in 14 months in August.
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