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Aug 23, 2014

RT | The Keiser Report - August 23, 2014: Keiser Report: Skynet Robotic Future (E644).


R
In this episode of the Keiser Report, Max Keiser and Stacy Herbert discuss a future in which most jobs are obsolesced away by robots and mechanization. Just as human invention lost the horse many jobs it used to perform, so, too, for millions of workers - and it’s happening right now. In the second half, Max interviews Perianne Boring of the Chamber of Digital Commerce about the chamber’s role in advocating for bitcoin 

The Economist Insights | Weekly Digest Published on August 22, 2013: Can Sub-Saharan Africa address the rise of non-communicable diseases?

The Economist

The Economist
Weekly Digest
Issue #41
This week we examine to what extent healthcare systems in Sub-Saharan Africa are prepared to address the rise of non-communicable diseases; we consider why going back to basics is necessary in the fight against tuberculosis; and we invite you to join our online webinar to investigate the global challenges facing asset managers.
Analysis
The NCD risk in Africa is growing, as societal shifts increasingly constrain certain healthy lifestyle choices and create opportunities for unhealthy ones.Sub-Saharan African healthcare: the user experience, an EIU report sponsored by Novartis, aims to understand the dramatic rise in NCDs and the degree to which the region’s healthcare systems are prepared to address the problem.

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Fraud reportInnovating to optimise
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report imageAncient enemy, modern imperative
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25 Social Business Leaders
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report imageFTAs: fantastic, fine or futile?
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Opinion
logoFighting Tuberculosis
Targets can focus minds, but like new tools they can’t deliver significant progress if a country's public health system is poorly organised or administered, or suffers from a lack of political and financial support.

Neil Schluger, chief scientific officer, World Lung Foundation
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Managing an ageing workforce
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Should businesses embrace mobile working?
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report imageLocal currency debt: Laggard
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Never-ending strategies
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Global markets are going through a period of change and increasing complexity. The first in a global series exploring perspectives on investment themes, this live webinar will investigate the challenges that investors face and the opportunities. Register now to watch it free of charge.
Kevin Plumberg
Senior Editor, Thought Leadership Asia 
The Economist Intelligence Unit
Badliyah Abdul Ghani, 
Chief Executive Officer,
CIMB Islamic Bank Berhad
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Senior Vice President, Emerging Markets Portfolio Manager, 
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NYT | Todays Headlines - August 23, 2014: Top News: Rear Adm. John Kirby, the Pentagon spokesman, fielded questions about events in the Middle East and Ukraine on Friday. U.S. Weighs Direct Military Action Against ISIS in Syria.

The New York TimesMost Popular | Video 

Today's Headlines

Saturday, August 23, 2014


Top News
Rear Adm. John Kirby, the Pentagon spokesman, fielded questions about events in the Middle East and Ukraine on Friday.
U.S. Weighs Direct Military Action Against ISIS in Syria

By PETER BAKER and MICHAEL D. SHEAR

A top national security adviser to President Obama said the United States was "not going to be restricted by borders" to protect its interests, including possibly pursuing direct military action in Syria.
Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel called the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria an
U.S. Isn't Sure Just How Much to Fear ISIS

By MARK MAZZETTI and HELENE COOPER

With the rapid advance of the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, the rhetoric the Obama administration is using to describe the danger the group poses to the United States has escalated.
A Russian aid convoy on Friday passed into Ukraine from Russia at a checkpoint in Izvaryne.
Russians Open Fire in Ukraine, NATO Reports

By ANDREW HIGGINS and MICHAEL R. GORDON

NATO officials said that the Russian military had moved artillery units inside Ukrainian territory in recent days and was using them to fire at Ukrainian forces.
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »
Editors' Picks
Militants on Friday prepared to execute Palestinians in Gaza City suspected of spying for Israel. Up to 18 were killed.

WORLD

Executions in Gaza Are a Warning to Spies

By FARES AKRAM and JODI RUDOREN

Witnesses said more than a dozen were killed in what was seen as a message to potential informants after Israel's assassination of three militant leaders.
. Gaza Talks Build at U.N.

OPINION | ROOM FOR DEBATE

Should the U.S. Work With Assad to Fight ISIS?
Is the militant group such a threat to the United States that working with the despised Syrian dictator would be in the national interest?
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U.S. | A Terrorist Horror, Then Golf: Incongruity Fuels Obama Critics
WORLD | Executions in Gaza Are a Warning to Spies
WORLD | Russia Moves Artillery Units Into Ukraine, NATO Says

QUOTATION OF THE DAY

"Let the physical evidence tell us what happened. How badly injured was the police officer? Was he dazed? Was Michael Brown on drugs? Let's see what's really going on here."
PAT DIAZ, a former South Florida homicide detective who investigated more than 100 police shootings, on the shooting in Ferguson, Mo.
Today's Video
Video VIDEO: A Preview of the U.S. Open
Here's what to look for at this year's United States Open.
Video VIDEO: Bill Cunningham | Streets Paved in Gold
The illusion that the streets of Manhattan are paved with gold almost came to a reality this week.
Video VIDEO: The Long March to Peace
Gary Hill, an associate minister, lives in Ferguson, Mo., just a few blocks from where Michael Brown was killed on Aug. 9. He's urged for peace amid the volatile protests, with mixed results.
For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »
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World
Pentagon Says Chinese Fighter Jet Confronted American Navy Plane

By HELENE COOPER

The Chinese plane flew within 30 feet of the Navy aircraft on Tuesday in international airspace just off the Chinese coast, the Pentagon said.

THE SATURDAY PROFILE

American's Star Power Unrivaled in Japan

By MARTIN FACKLER

David Spector, with his bleach-blond hair and ability to deliver one-liners in flawless Japanese, has been a fixture in Japan's often raucous talk-show world for 30 years.
Blackouts in Egypt Prompt Accusations

By KAREEM FAHIM and MERNA THOMAS

Officials blamed supporters of a deposed leader, while others pointed fingers back at the government.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »
U.S.
Hospitals may pay $225 to $240 a unit of blood, according to executives in the business. Red cells have a life of 42 days.
Blood Industry Shrinks as Transfusions Decline

By MATTHEW L. WALD

Medical advances have increased efficiency, but the trend is forcing an enormous wave of mergers and job cutbacks.
National Guard soldiers stood watch away from protests on Thursday in Ferguson, Mo.
Key Factor in Police Shootings: 'Reasonable Fear'

By MICHAEL WINES and FRANCES ROBLES

A host of outside factors, from an officer's perception of a threat to the suspect's behavior and even his size, can emerge as mitigating or damning.
U.S. Faces Suit Over Tactics at Immigrant Detention Center

By JULIA PRESTON

Civil rights groups claim that the government committed due process violations against women and children held for deportation at a detention center in New Mexico.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »
Politics
Christine Jones, one of six Republican candidates for governor, at a meeting about border security in Bullhead City, Ariz., about 200 miles from Mexico.
As Arizona Primary Nears, Governor Candidates Turn Eyes to Border

By FERNANDA SANTOS

The six Republican candidates to succeed Jan Brewer as governor of Arizona are jumping over each other to sound tough on illegal immigration.
Gov. Scott Walker of Wisconsin
Emails Show Bigger Fund-Raising Role for Wisconsin Leader

By ADAM NAGOURNEY and MICHAEL BARBARO

Gov. Scott Walker of Wisconsin played a greater role than previously known in arranging for wealthy contributors to donate to a conservative organization, according to court documents.
. Document: Case File on Fund-Raising for a Group Helping Gov. Scott Walker
Florida Judge Deals a Blow to Democrats on Districting

By LIZETTE ALVAREZ

After the Republican-led Legislature's map was ruled unconstitutional last month, a slightly modified version is approved, but the 2014 election will proceed under the old map.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »
Business
Janet L. Yellen, the Fed chairwoman, speaks with Ady Barkan, a lawyer with the Center for Popular Democracy, which held a demonstration at the conference.
Fed Chief Sees Not Enough Data to Raise Rates

By BINYAMIN APPELBAUM

At her first keynote speech for the Federal Reserve's annual conference, Janet Yellen says she wants to see more evidence of a labor market recovery.
. The Upshot: Worrisome Long-Term Economic Trends
. The Upshot: Why the Robots Might Not Take Our Jobs After All
Tim Callaway looking out over his gold mine. He operated the mine in the 1990s and wants to again extract the valuable ore.
Efforts to Revive Rich California Mine Hit Strong Resistance

By CAROL POGASH

Where forty-niners once roamed, a plan to dig up 240,000 ounces of gold is vehemently opposed by local residents who fear damage to the environment and their way of life.
In December, 40 million credit card numbers and 70 million addresses, phone numbers and additional pieces of personal information were stolen from the retail giant Target.

BITS BLOG

U.S. Finds 'Backoff' Hacker Tool Is Widespread

By NICOLE PERLROTH

The Department of Homeland Security said on Friday that more than 1,000 businesses had been infected with the cash register malware used in the Target data breach and others, leading to the theft of data from millions of customers' payment cards.
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »
Technology
An example of a fake message purporting to be from the F.B.I. on a hijacked Android device infected with so-called ransomware.

BITS BLOG

Android Phones Hit by 'Ransomware'

By NICOLE PERLROTH

Hackers have figured out how to lock people out of their Android devices and demand money in exchange for letting them back in.
In a proposed settlement of a shareholders' suit against HP, shareholders would receive no money, while their lawyers could receive up to $48 million in fees.

COMMON SENSE

Big Payoffs in HP Suit, for Lawyers

By JAMES B. STEWART

When Hewlett shareholders sued over "unlawful behavior" in the takeover of Autonomy, they didn't expect to be shut out in a possible settlement.
Why We're Not Driving the Friendly Skies

By STUART F. BROWN

The dream of creating a flying car has reduced many would-be inventors to despair as they grasped the immensity of the engineering and design challenges of the divergent natures of airplanes and cars.
. Terrafugia Transition
. Pie-in-the-Sky Flying Cars From the Past
. Photographs  Slide Show: Wheels and Wings
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »
Sports
In a lease arrangement with New York City, the U.S.T.A. pays $400,000 a year, plus one percent of its revenue, roughly $2.5 million last year, for its 46.5-acre National Tennis Center in Queens.
A Tennis Board Woven With Conflicts

By MARY PILON and ANDREW W. LEHREN

An examination of the United States Tennis Association's finances shows that several of the group's current and recent board members have benefited from its grants and contracts.
Seto Daiya, left, and Kosuke Hagino of Japan after the 400-meter individual medley final on Friday.
Japanese Swimming Has Momentum at Its Back

By KAREN CROUSE

The momentum the Japanese are building at the Pan Pacific Championships could carry over to the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo.
Duke Kahanamoku, left, and his brother Sam in 1924.

THE UPSHOT

Duke of Hawaii: A Swimmer and Surfer Who Straddled Two Cultures

By MICHAEL BESCHLOSS

Duke Kahanamoku, who helped America become a little more Hawaiian by spreading the gospel of surfing, also helped Hawaii become more American.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »