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Aug 9, 2014

The Economist | Insights Weekly Digest: Seismic shifts in investment management.

The Economist

The Economist
Weekly Digest
Issue #40
This week we examine fundamental changes in the UK investment management industry; we consider talent as an increasingly critical differentiator of corporate performance; and we invite you to The World in Gala Dinner.
Analysis
Asset managers are adapting to demands from UK investors for increasingly global products Seismic shifts in investment management is a Deloitte report written by the EIU, which analyses the drivers behind the fundamental changes in the UK investment management industry.

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Opinion
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Talent is an increasingly critical differentiator of corporate performance.

Jean Martin, Executive Director, Talent Solutions Architect, CEB
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GATA | THE GATA DISPATCH August 9, 2014: Koos Jansen: Chinese gold demand 1,094 tonnes this year; silver premium at record | Money printing, Ukraine, disease make Sprott wary of stocks and bonds.


Koos Jansen: Chinese gold demand 1,094 tonnes this year; silver premium at record

Submitted by cpowell on  Saturday, August 9, 2014. 
 Saturday, August 9, 2014
Dear Friend of GATA and Gold:
Through July gold offtake for the year on the Shanghai Gold Exchange reached nearly 1,100 tonnes, gold researcher and GATA consultant Koos Jansen reports today. Meanwhile, Jansen adds, silver futures on the Shanghai Futures Exchange are priced at a premium of 8 percent to spot silver in London. His analysis is posted at Bullion Star here:

________________________________________________________________________

Money printing, Ukraine, disease make Sprott wary of stocks and bonds

Submitted by cpowell on  Saturday, August 9, 2014. Section: Daily Dispatches
Saturday, August 9, 2014
Dear Friend of GATA and Gold:
In his weekly review with Sprott Money News, Sprott Asset Management CEO Eric Sprott explains his wariness about the stock and bond markets amid central bank money printing, international conflict over Ukraine, and the spreading of hemorrhagic fever in west Africa. The interview is not quite 8 minutes long and can be heard at the Sprott Money Internet site here:
CHRIS POWELL, Secretary/Treasurer
Gold Anti-Trust Action Committee Inc
.

NYT | Today's Headlines - August 9, 2014: Top News: U.S. Jets and Drones Attack Militants in Iraq, Hoping to Stop Advance

The New York TimesMost Popular | Video | My Account

Today's Headlines

Saturday, August 9, 2014


Top News
Airstrikes targeted militants outside Erbil on Friday.
U.S. Jets and Drones Attack Militants in Iraq, Hoping to Stop Advance

By ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIM ARANGO and HELENE COOPER

American warplanes launched airstrikes against Sunni militants in northern Iraq on Friday, destroying rebel positions around Erbil, the Kurdish capital.
Pesh merga fighters on Friday near a Kurdish checkpoint west of Erbil, a city where there were concerns that the advance of ISIS would pose a risk to Americans.
Fear of 'Another Benghazi' Drove White House to Airstrikes in Iraq

By MARK LANDLER, ALISSA J. RUBIN, MARK MAZZETTI and HELENE COOPER

Interviews with multiple officials in the Obama administration paint a portrait of a president forced by the unexpectedly rapid deterioration of security in Iraq to abandon his longstanding reluctance to use military force.
An Israeli airstrike in Gaza City on Friday.
New Fighting a Bid for Leverage as a Gaza Cease-Fire Expires

By JODI RUDOREN and ISABEL KERSHNER

Israel and Palestinian militants resumed cross-border air assaults after a three-day cease-fire expired, but the renewed violence seemed less about meeting military goals than about jockeying for leverage in talks that had made little progress.
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »
Editors' Picks
President Obama said on Friday that Iraq's leaders must form an inclusive government in order to pull the country together.

WORLD

While Offering Support, Obama Warns That U.S. Won't Be 'Iraqi Air Force'

By MICHAEL D. SHEAR and JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS

The president, addressing critics in both parties, asserted that the United States has a "strategic interest in pushing back" ISIS.
Thomas L. Friedman

OPINION | OP-ED COLUMNIST

Obama on the World

By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN

In a wide-ranging interview, the president explains American policy on Iraq, Putin and the Israelis and Palestinians.
. Columnist Page
RECOMMENDED FOR YOU
WORLD | U.S. Jets and Drones Attack Militants in Iraq, Hoping to Stop Advance
WORLD | Obama, With Reluctance, Returns to Action in Iraq
WORLD | Obama Allows Limited Airstrikes on ISIS

QUOTATION OF THE DAY

"Fifty percent of my questions are about why their hair is not falling out. It is the zillionth time I have answered it."
DR. MAHINDER WATSA, 90, who writes the Ask the Sexpert column in a Mumbai newspaper, on Indian men who write in with unfounded fears about masturbation.
Today's Video
Video VIDEO: The Pesh Merga's Fight Against ISIS
A look at who the pesh merga are, their history as Iraq's most formidable force, and why President Obama has now authorized airstrikes against ISIS to support them.
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Video VIDEO: In Peru, Trading Boats for Boards
On Peru's northern coastline, the long history of reedboats is threatened as a new generation looks beyond fishing for careers and opportunities like surfing.
. Related Article
Video VIDEO: Bill Cunningham | Gray is the New Black
Gray is the summer shade in the city.
For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »
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World
Secretary of State John Kerry with Ashraf Ghani, to his right, who was ahead in preliminary results from the runoff, and Abdullah Abdullah, second from right, his opponent.
Afghan Rivals Back a Deal, Once More, for President

By MICHAEL R. GORDON and ROD NORDLAND

The two candidates reaffirmed their commitment to accept the results of an internationally monitored recount of votes regardless of who prevails.
Turkey's Premier Tries to Keep Power, as President

By SEBNEM ARSU and TIM ARANGO

Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan is expected to winSunday's presidential vote and transform an office that has been largely ceremonial.
A dairy farm that began operation on Friday in Petrovskoye, in the Leningrad region. A
Half a Ton of This, Half a Ton of That: Russia Is Calm Over Food Import Bans

By NEIL MacFARQUHAR

Retaliatory sanctions against Western products have led to a "buy Russian" campaign and some signs that there were ways around the problem.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »
U.S.
James Brady in 2011.
Coroner Is Said to Rule James Brady's Death a Homicide, 33 Years After a Shooting

By NICK CORASANITI

The medical examiner's ruling could allow prosecutors to pursue murder charges against John W. Hinckley Jr. in the 1981 assassination attempt on President Ronald Reagan.
Opponents of Texas' restrictive abortion law protested this week outside a courthouse in Austin, where it is being challenged in a federal suit.
Out-of-State Clinic Is Central in Texas Abortion Law Fight

By MANNY FERNANDEZ

The state's reliance on the New Mexico clinic is being disparaged by the law's critics, who say that would be contrary to a recent abortion ruling in Mississippi.
Claude Mokbel, a Jetpack America instructor, flying above Newport Beach Harbor, Calif. Concerns about noise and possible injuries led to a six-month moratorium on new jetpack businesses.
Thrill Ride Flies in the Face of Gravity, as Well as Cautious Officials

By JENNIFER MEDINA

Instruction, rental and sale of jetpacks has proved popular for a company in Newport Beach, Calif., and other shorefront communities.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »
Politics
A tour bus passing by the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, where the Democratic National Convention will be held if New York City wins the bid to host it.
Clintons Support de Blasio's Push to Bring Democratic Convention to Brooklyn

By AMY CHOZICK and MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM

Before Mayor Bill de Blasio began his bid to win the 2016 convention he made sure he had the Clintons' blessing, three people familiar with the discussions said.
Florida Redraws an Election Map That Was Ruled to Be Unconstitutional

By LIZETTE ALVAREZ

With Florida's election schedule in disarray after a judge ruled the state's congressional map unconstitutional, lawmakers on Friday approved redesigned districts - drawn in private by the two Republican committee heads, their staff and outside lawyers.
Paul Perito, center, was flanked by his lawyers outside a courthouse in Richmond, Va., where he testified Friday in the corruption trial of former Gov. Bob McDonnell.
Virginia Ex-Governor's Trial Keeps Focus on Key Donor's Character

By THEODORE SCHLEIFER

The corporate mentor of Jonnie R. Williams Sr., a witness in the corruption case against former Gov. Bob McDonnell, said his protégé jeopardized the company trying to curry political favor.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »
Business
Some farmers in India are partnering with Pepsi to bring the apples quickly to market.
Cashew Juice, the Apple of Pepsi's Eye

By STEPHANIE STROM

While farmers in India once left cashew apples to rot, some are now selling them as the source of what Pepsi hopes could be the next coconut water.

DEALBOOK

Yields on 10-Year Treasuries Fall, Confounding the Experts

By JEFF SOMMER

The 10-year Treasury note fell to 2.42 percent with some analysts contending the decline was a response to current events.
In China, British Investigator Hired by Glaxo, and Wife, Sentenced to Prison

By DAVID BARBOZA

A couple pleaded guilty to illegally obtaining private records on Chinese citizens and were sentenced to prison terms.
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »
Technology
The judge said the evidence against the defendants was compelling - saying, for example, that Steve Jobs, Apple's late chief executive, was
Court Rejects Deal on Hiring in Silicon Valley

By DAVID STREITFELD

A judge rejected a settlement in a case that accuses tech companies of agreeing not to solicit one another's employees.

YOUR MONEY

A Two-Step Plan to Stop Hackers

By RON LIEBER

You may not be able to keep your digital credentials from being stolen, but there are options for keeping a cyberthief from using them successfully.
. Russian Hackers Amass Over a Billion Internet Passwords
The permissions required by the Facebook Messenger app have given some users pause.

BITS BLOG

Facebook Messenger Switch Controversy Is Part Misunderstanding, Part Mistrust

By MOLLY WOOD

Facebook users are angry over a forced migration to the company's Messenger app and worried about its privacy implications. Are they overreacting?
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »
Sports
Ed O'Bannon, who played college basketball, sued the N.C.A.A. after his image as a player was used years later in a video game.
N.C.A.A. Must Allow Colleges to Pay Athletes, Judge Rules

By BEN STRAUSS and MARC TRACY

A federal judge decided Friday in the so-called O'Bannon case, the most prominent lawsuit lodged against college sports' governing body, that the N.C.A.A.'s current rules violate federal antitrust law.
What the O'Bannon Ruling Means for Colleges and Players

By KEN BELSON

The landmark decision may cost the N.C.A.A. hundreds of millions of dollars, but it may not create a windfall for any individual athlete.
Rory McIlroy endured a weather delay in the second round Friday to improve his two-day score to nine under par.
Shining Through the Sogginess

By BILL PENNINGTON

Playing through a rainy day at Valhalla Golf Club, Rory McIlroy, who won the British Open last month, took the second-round lead. Tiger Woods missed the cut.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »
Arts
Mark Morris Dance Group  The troupe performing Mr. Morris's staging of

DANCE REVIEW

An Old Love Story, Tinkered for the Times

By ALASTAIR MACAULAY

Mark Morris's ballet version of Ovid's love story of the shepherd Acis and the sea nymph Galatea arrives in New York with some important details adjusted.
Laszlo Krasznahorkai, avoider of punctuation.
He Rarely Stops Writing

By LARRY ROHTER

American readers are discovering the Hungarian novelist Laszlo Krasznahorkai, known for his absurdist stories