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Aug 3, 2014

GATA | THE GATA DISPATCH - July 3 , 2014: Bill Murphy: It's much bigger than you think.

Bill Murphy: It's much bigger than you think

Submitted by cpowell on Sunday, August 3, 2014. Section: Daily Dispatches Sunday, August 3, 2014
In commentary headlined "It's Much Bigger Than You Think," GATA Chairman Bill Murphy describes the mainstream financial news media's own suppression of the gold price suppression story and explains why the issue is so sensitive and explosive. Murphy's commentary is posted at GoldSeek here:
CHRIS POWELL, Secretary/Treasurer
Gold Anti-Trust Action Committee Inc.

RT | Technology: Two Wheeled Tech (E75) : August 3, 2014:

A great Documentary ... Don't miss it


                  Fernando Guzmán Cavero

Technology Update: Two-Wheeled Tech (E75)





NYT | Today's Headlines - August 3, 2014: Top News: Missing Soldier Killed in Battle, Israel Confirms

The New York TimesMost Popular | Video | My Account

Today's Headlines

Sunday, August 3, 2014


Top News
Missing Soldier Killed in Battle, Israel Confirms

By STEVEN ERLANGER and JODI RUDOREN

The Israeli military said the soldier who had been thought captured by Palestinian militants during a deadly clash on Fridaywas now considered to have been killed in battle.
Under the arrangement, Russian scientists would have been allowed into, among other places, the heart of the American nuclear complex at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico.
U.S. Nuclear Deal With Russia Is Derailed as Tensions Rise

By DAVID E. SANGER and WILLIAM J. BROAD

The growing confrontation between the United States and Russia has derailed an accord to expand collaboration on nuclear projects, including reciprocal visits to atomic sites by scientists.
Hope Dwindles for Hondurans Living in Peril

By RANDAL C. ARCHIBOLD

Residents of Chamelecón, the most dangerous neighborhood in one of the most dangerous cities in the hemisphere, face a daily grind of murder and mayhem.
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »
Editors' Picks
A panel sits in judgment at a start-up competition at Michigan State, where data analytics and business acumen are part of the law school curriculum.

EDUCATION

This Is Law School?

By JOHN SCHWARTZ

Looking to the future of a challenging profession, law schools want their students to be able to advise entrepreneurs in coming fields. That means learning quantitative skills, business and tech.
. Evaluating That Third - Boring - Year
. Go to Education Life »

OPINION | EDITORIAL

The Great Colorado Weed Experiment

By LAWRENCE DOWNES

The state is showing that legalization can work, though there are still kinks to be figured out.
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WORLD | Missing Soldier Killed in Battle, Israel Confirms
N.Y. / REGION | A Mound of Forgotten Money, and Even You May Have a Claim
U.S. | American Doctor With Ebola Arrives in U.S. for Treatment

QUOTATION OF THE DAY

"It's like sending kindergartners up against an N.B.A. basketball team."
STEVEN S. DUDLEY, a director of InsightCrime.com, a website tracking and analyzing Latin American crime trends, describing how Honduran police are no match for the gangs and drug cartels.
Today's Video
Video VIDEO: The Marijuana Divide
In Colorado, two towns near each other have divergent reactions to their state's legalization of marijuana.
Video VIDEO: Vows | Here Comes the Drone
More videographers are using small drones to capture that perfect, death-defying shot – of a wedding.
For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »
ADVERTISEMENT
World
Medics at a field hospital in Rafah, Gaza Strip. More than 120 Palestinians were killed in Rafah alone on Friday and Saturday.
Hospitals in Gaza Overwhelmed as Attacks Continue

By BEN HUBBARD and FARES AKRAM

More than 120 Palestinians were killed in Rafah, Gaza Strip, on Friday and Saturday. Those deaths, and hundreds of injuries, overwhelmed the city's health care facilities.
Putin Strives to Harness Energy of Russian Pilgrims for Political Profit

By NEIL MacFARQUHAR

Celebrations for the 700th birthday of St. Sergius emphasized his role in shaping a unified Russia, a narrative that dovetails with the Kremlin's political aims.
China Experiences a Booming Underground Market in Child Surrogacy

By IAN JOHNSON and CAO LI

The rise of surrogacy links wealthy couples with poor women, in a murky world of online brokers, dubious private clinics and expensive trips to foreign countries.
. Video  Video: Shadowy World for Chinese Surrogates
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »
U.S.
Meaghan Ybos, left, and Madison Graves have filed a lawsuit against the authorities in Memphis, saying that lax investigations and reckless handling of rape kits left predators on the loose and inflicted wrenching uncertainty on victims.
No Longer Ignored, Evidence Solves Rape Cases Years Later

By ERIK ECKHOLM

Hundreds of thousands of kits from sexual assault cases have gone untested, but cities like Memphis and Detroit are beginning to test evidence and get results.
Dr. Kent Brantly, right, arrived at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta on Saturday.
American Doctor With Ebola Arrives in U.S. for Treatment

By ALAN BLINDER and DENISE GRADY

The first of two American aid workers infected with Ebola while working in West Africa was admitted to an Atlanta hospital on Saturday.
An insurance information session in Philadelphia.
Newly Insured, Many Now Face Learning Curve

By ABBY GOODNOUGH

The Affordable Care Act is reaching many people who have not had health insurance in years, if at all, and they are struggling to understand their policies.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »
Politics
Richard Le Jeune, a cattle rancher in Halfway, Mo., supports Amendment 1. It would guarantee the right to
Missouri Weighs Unusual Addition to Its Constitution: Right to Farm

By JULIE BOSMAN

While the amendment would not affect federal laws governing agriculture, its possible effect on local and state laws is unclear.
Alison Lundergan Grimes, the Democrat running against Senator Mitch McConnell, took part at the annual church picnic Saturday in Fancy Farm, Ky., known for its barbecue.
Senate Rivals Exchange Barbs at Kentucky Picnic

By TRIP GABRIEL

A day after Congress ingloriously left Washington for summer break, members shifted to their real focus this year: the midterm elections.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »
Business
Houseboats moored last month on Lake Shasta in Northern California. With the state in the third year of a drought, the lake was at 35 percent of total capacity last week.

THE UPSHOT

Shattering Myths to Help the Climate

By ROBERT H. FRANK

Prompt, effective measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions could prevent much of the damage from climate change at relatively modest cost.
Toyonnia Hodges at Central City Concern's clinic in Portland, Ore. She recently learned she had hepatitis C, contracted from a blood transfusion.

THE UPSHOT

High Cure Rate, but Huge Cost, for Hepatitis C Pill

By MARGOT SANGER-KATZ

Critics have raised an outcry over Sovaldi, a hepatitis C drug heralded as a breakthrough but costing $84,000 for a typical person's total treatment.

FAIR GAME

Big Banks Still a Risk

By GRETCHEN MORGENSON

A new study that assessed the value to banks of the implied guarantee by taxpayers raised more questions than it answered.
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »
Technology
Carla Echevarria, a creative strategist for Facebook, at a
How Facebook Sold You Krill Oil

By VINDU GOEL

To grab some of TV's ad dollars, the social network is trying to help advertisers reach the perfect customer.
Genevieve Bell is an Australian-born anthropologist who is Intel's resident tech intellectual.

BITS BLOG

Where Tech Is Taking Us: A Conversation With Intel's Genevieve Bell

By QUENTIN HARDY

An anthropologist who is also an Intel Fellow, Ms. Bell is convinced we are at a rare period of social change, with the explosion of digital intelligence into every part of our lives.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »
Sports
Paul George underwent an operation on an open fracture in Las Vegas, USA Basketball said Saturday.
Paul George's Injury Fuels Concerns in N.B.A. Over International Competition

By ANDREW KEH

The league receives global exposure through such play but gets few tangible benefits, and team owners worry about injuries to players they have invested a lot of money in.
Leery Golfers Have a Policy for Trophies Not Yet Won: Hands Off

By KAREN CROUSE

Many players on tour share a superstition when it comes to handling their sport's most coveted prizes.
The bronze busts of the Pro Football Hall of Fame's class of 2014 were stored in the archive room until Saturday's induction ceremony in Canton, Ohio.
Football's Hall of Fame Enjoys Boom to Go With Busts

By KEN BELSON

The Pro Football Hall of Fame has worked to burnish its legacy by revamping its museum and programs to prepare for the centennial of the founding of what became the N.F.L.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »
Arts
From left, Shia LaBeouf, Brad Pitt, Logan Lerman, Michael Peña and Jon Bernthal in
'Fury,' Starring Brad Pitt, a Raw Look at Warfare

By MICHAEL CIEPLY

The film offers a relentlessly authentic portrayal of the extremes endured, and inflicted, by Allied troops who entered Germany in the spring of 1945.
A Sound Shaped by Time and Tools

By MICHAEL COOPER

Ask conductors and musicians, and they'll single out the Vienna Philharmonic for its unique style, one that has persisted as other orchestras sound more alike. What's its secret?

CROSS CUTS

The Squeeze on the Middlebrow

By A. O. SCOTT

The implications of entrenched inequality described by the economist Thomas Piketty extend beyond the realm of political economy.
For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »