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Jul 8, 2014

RT | The Keiser Report - July 8, 2014: Empire of Fictional Cash (E624).



Keiser Report: Empire of Fictional Cash (E624)

RT 

YouTube | Al Jazeera English - July 8, 2014: Israel-Gaza tensions: Preparing for battle? and Voters face Stark Choice in Indonesia polls



Al Jazeera English has uploaded Israel-Gaza tensions: Preparing for battle? and Voters face Stark Choice in Indonesia polls




Israel-Gaza tensions: Preparing for battle?
Al Jazeera English



Voters face stark choice in Indonesia polls
Al Jazeera English

GATA | THE GATA DISPATCH July 8, 2014: New York Sun: Congress eyes rules for the Fed

New York Sun: Congress eyes rules for the Fed

Submitted by cpowell on  Tuesday, July 8, 2014. 
, July 8, 2014
At least six measures of monetary reform have been proposed to Congress, The New York Sun reports in an editorial today, including a bill requiring the Federal Reserve to propose rules for its operation and submit them to Congress for approval, a bill to allow free competition in currencies, and a bill to audit the Fed. The Sun's editorial is headined "Congress Eyes Rules for the Fed" and it's posted here:
CHRIS POWELL, Secretary/Treasurer
Gold Anti-Trust Action Committee Inc.

NYT | Booming - July 8, 2014: Moving Back In, to Care for My Parents

Tuesday, July 8, 2014
All in This Together
After years of living abroad, Jennifer Conlin and her husband buy her parents' home and move in with them.

MOTHERLODE BLOG

Three Generations, One Home, One Unavoidable Future | Does sharing a home with your parents or in-laws also mean spending more time thinking about death?

RETIRING

Some States Look to Fill a Retirement Savings Gap |Connecticut and Illinois are among the states considering programs to allow workers to direct pretax money from paychecks to retirement accounts.
Carrie Wilkens works with substance abusers and families at the Center for Motivation and Change in Manhattan.

A Different Path to Fighting Addiction | A growing wing of addiction treatment rejects the Alcoholics Anonymous model of strict abstinence as the sole form of recovery for alcohol and drug users.

MACHINE LEARNING

Swear Off Social Media, for Good or Just for Now | Those concerned about their online profiles have a range of options, from deactivating their accounts completely to limiting who sees past posts.

Social Media's Vampires: They Text by Night | Often defying parents' rules, many teenagers spend the wee hours using social media with friends.
Michael Palin, Terry Gilliam, Eric Idle, John Cleese and Terry Jones onstage at the opening night of ''Monty Python Live (mostly).

Everyone Expects the Spanish Inquisition | The beloved great-uncles of British humor perform for loyal and new fans in their new production, "Monty Python Live (mostly)," at the O2 arena in London.

SKETCH GUY

A Little Bit of Realism Can Result in a Lot More Happiness | Tempering expectations with reality can forestall much disappointment, a financial planner writes.
Five years after his husband's death, Gerald Passaro learned that the Bayer Corporation had agreed that he was entitled to benefits.

Gay, Widowed and Fighting for What They're Due |Despite government moves to ease the path, a dense legal and bureaucratic thicket often awaits the survivor in a same-sex marriage, advocates say.

THE UPSHOT

Younger Americans Are Less Patriotic. At Least, in Some Ways. | They are less devoted to symbols of the nation, like the flag. But they are supportive of ideals like democracy and equality.
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UNHITCHED

Divorce: Share Your Experience | Unhitched, a column appearing in the Vows pages of The New York Times, tells the story of a relationship, from romance to marriage to divorce to life afterward. If you are divorced and you and your ex are willing to be interviewed, please fill out the form at:nytimes.com/weddings.

ABOUT THE BOOMING NEWSLETTER

Booming presents news, essays, financial advice and commentary for baby boomers. Subscribe at: nytimes.com/marketing/booming.

Bits | The Business of Technology - July 8, 2014: Russian Arrested in Guam on Array of U.S. Hacking Charges.

Tuesday, July 8, 2014
For the latest updates, go to nytimes.com/bits »
Morning Report
Russian Arrested in Guam on Array of U.S. Hacking Charges | A Russian man accused of being one of the world's most prolific traffickers of stolen financial information was arrested in Guam on Saturday, according to the Secret Service.

Roman Valerevich Seleznev was arrested on charges that he hacked into cash register systems at retailers throughout the United States from 2009 to 2011.

The Secret Service would not say whether he was tied to the recent attacks that affected the in-store cash register systems at Target, Neiman Marcus, Michaels and other retailers last year.

The arrest of Mr. Seleznev provides a lens onto the shadowy world of Russian hackers, the often sophisticated programmers who seem to operate with impunity. As long ago as March 2011, the United States attorney's office in Washington State identified Mr. Seleznev, a Russian citizen, in a sealed indictment as "Track2," an underground alias that is an apparent reference to the data that can be pulled off the magnetic strips of credit and debit cards.

That data includes enough basic information - like account numbers and expiration dates - to make fraudulent purchases. Read more »

More From The Times
Students at Samsung Electronics' headquarters in Seoul. The company predicted a profit of $7.1 billion for the last quarter, which would be a 24 percent decline over the same period a year ago.
Samsung Foresees a Decline in Profit | The electronics company predicted a profit of $7.1 billion for the last quarter, which would be a 24 percent decline over the same period a year ago, and cited slower sales and increased competition in China.
Imad Sousou, general manager of Intel's open-source technology center.
Intel, Qualcomm and Others Compete for 'Internet of Things' Standard | For a lot of tech companies, the devices and the data promised by the Internet of Things has a huge potential. That makes the way we get there, even through ostensibly free open source projects, into a battleground.
New T.S.A. Rules for Electronics on Flights Bound for U.S. | American officials are responding to intelligence reports that explosives could be disguised inside devices like cellphones.
The world's most dangerous bike? The jet engine fitted to a rickety old bicycle.
The X-Man Next Door, Claws and All | Colin Furze, a garage inventor and do-it-yourself daredevil from England, is a high school dropout who harnessed the powers of the X-Men superheroes to become a YouTube star.
Why I Ditched My Co-Working Space | At first, the place felt like a utopia. We were in the hub of the New York tech community, surrounded by funky people designing products that just might change the world. After two months, I gave notice that we would be moving out.
Security Firm Described Simulation as Real Hack | BAE Systems Applied Intelligence retracts claims it helped thwart a sophisticated cyberattack at a hedge fund. The attack was not an attack at all. It was a simulation.
Personal Technology
Smartphones have expanded the opportunity for certain kinds of workers to increase their involvement in their children's lives.
You Don't Have to Feel Very Guilty About Using Your Smartphone While Parenting | A preschool boy has a vacation. And his father finds a way to spend time with him and still get his work done.
A Taxi Alternative, UberX, Offers Lower Fares | Uber said it had lowered prices for a service known as uberX - a hodgepodge fleet of unglamorous sedans, minivans and other vehicles - by 20 percent, making it less expensive than the typical yellow taxi ride, according to the company.
Expensive Internet and Other Hotel Peeves | An online survey of travelers' top two complaints about hotels were expensive or balky Internet service, and insufficient or hard-to-reach guest-room power outlets.
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Best of Scuttlebot  News from the Web, annotated by our staff
Inside Google Shopping Express' Big Plan to Race Amazon to Your Door | RECODE.NET
The search giant is spending big bucks to beef up its e-commerce efforts. - ಠ_ಠ
For more Scuttlebot, follow @nytimesbits »

NYT | Opinion - July 8, 2014: Should Germans Read 'Mein Kampf'?.

Opinion

Tuesday, July 8, 2014


OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR
Should Germans Read 'Mein Kampf'?
Mark Pernice
By PETER ROSS RANGE
A new edition of Hitler's book may help them confront their past.
TODAY'S EDITORIALS
Four Horrific Killings
By THE EDITORIAL BOARD
It is the responsibility of Israeli and Palestinian leaders to calm the volatile emotions that once again threaten both sides after the killings of four teenagers.
EDITORIAL
Germany and the Minimum Wage
The country's move to establish a national minimum wage offers the United States important lessons, if only lawmakers in Washington would learn.
EDITORIAL
The Long Wait to See a Doctor
A survey punctured the illusion that our high-priced health care system provides faster service than the national systems in other advanced countries.
EDITORIAL
New York's Mapmaking Scandal
A constitutional amendment would only make it easier for legislators to continue to draw district maps that help no one but the incumbents.

Today's Columnists
David Brooks
DAVID BROOKS
The Creative Climate
Creative tension between people and within individuals is fundamental to social evolution.
Joe Nocera
JOE NOCERA
The Messy World of Smart Guns
Advancements in technology and legislation run up against the N.R.A.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY

"Japan has pledged that it will never again wage war, and we have never stopped working for a world that is at peace."
ROOM FOR DEBATE
To Camp, or Not to Camp
Is summer for planned activities, or a time for kids to wander?
ADVERTISEMENT
OPINIONATOR | DRAFT
Writing Alone, Together
By BONNIE TSUI
I used to spend my days in voluntary solitary confinement. Then I joined a writers' collective.
Clemens Wergin
CLEMENS WERGIN
Is Obama's Foreign Policy Too European?
The president wanted to embrace Europe's soft-power approach to foreign policy. But it doesn't work.
OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR
China Rethinks the Death Penalty
By MARA HVISTENDAHL
Outcry over wrongful convictions has challenged the legitimacy of the judiciary.
John F. Malta
LETTERS
Forced Out: High Rent Alters a City
Readers respond to an Op-Ed article by the restaurateur Danny Meyer.
TAKING NOTE
Newer, Bigger, Faster Trains
By ELEANOR RANDOLPH
Acelas are extremely crowded and often sold out. But Amtrak's working on that.
PAUL KRUGMAN BLOG
Knutty Asset Prices
By PAUL KRUGMAN
About those "artificially low" interest rates.

DealBook P.M. Edition - July 8, 2014: Top Story: Jury Clears Rengan Rajaratnam in Insider Trading Case.

For the latest updates, go to dealbook.nytimes.com »
TUESDAY, JULY 8, 2014
TOP STORY
Rengan Rajaratnam, right, with his lawyer leaving Federal District Court in Manhattan on Monday.
Jury Clears Rengan Rajaratnam in Insider Trading Case The acquittal is the first defeat for Preet Bharara, the United States attorney in Manhattan, after 85 convictions and guilty pleas in a long crackdown on insider trading in the hedge fund industry.
For the latest updates, go to dealbook.nytimes.com »
DEALBOOK HIGHLIGHTS
The drug maker Shire has several attention deficit hyperactivity disorder medications including Adderall.
AbbVie Raises Bid for Irish Drug Maker Shire AbbVie, which is seeking to reincorporate overseas to avoid higher taxes in the United States, is now offering $51.6 billion, about 11 percent more than its previous offer for Shire.
Reuters Breakingviews: Shire Can Get Higher Bid From AbbVieShire's board still has some leverage. For one, there's AbbVie's own weakness, because roughly 58 percent of its sales come from one drug, Neil Unmack and Robert Cyran of Reuters Breakingviews write.
Commerzbank has set aside more than enough to cover penalties that are expected to be at least $500 million.
Investors Punish Shares of Commerzbank Even though Commerzbank disclosed four years ago that it was among lenders being investigated for its dealings with Iran and other countries blacklisted by the United States, news of a potential financial hit comes at an inopportune time.
Jeffrey Mayer of Deutsche Bank to Depart for Cerberus With big banks facing increased scrutiny in the aftermath of the financial crisis, a number of bankers have found attractive opportunities at private equity firms.
Barclays Names New Head of Mergers and Acquisitions Gary Posternack, a veteran of Lehman Brothers, had previously been head of mergers and acquisitions for the Americas at Barclays and will continue to be based in New York.
Crumbs Bake Shop opened a store in Beverly Hills in 2007.
As the Cupcake Declines, Crumbs Shuts Its DoorsCrumbs went public on the Nasdaq stock exchange in 2011 with great fanfare and ambitious expansion plans. But since then, shares of Crumbs have steadily fallen and its revenue has declined.
An advertising campaign for GoDaddy.
Reuters Breakingviews: In Dividing Up Extra Tax Spoils, Risks for New Investors Go Daddy will go public with big potential tax deductions on its books, and investors and sponsors will benefit. But other I.P.O.'s with the same tax structure have more dubious arrangements, Robert Cyran of Reuters Breakingviews writes.
2 Leaders Named to NN Group Posts After Spinoff Robin Spencer will be head of international insurance for the NN Group, succeeding David Knibbe, who will become chief of the group's Dutch insurance business.
LOOKING AHEAD
Fed Minutes Due Wednesday Investors may find hints of the Fed's next steps in the minutes of its policy-making committee's June meeting, scheduled for publication Wednesday. But the pickings are likely to be slim. Key issues remain unresolved and the Fed, led by Janet L. Yellen, doesn't want to tip its hand too soon.
No Rate Movement Expected at Bank of England Meeting The Bank of England's Monetary Policy Committee meets Thursday on whether to raise interest rates. While no action is expected, investors will scour the minutes, which are released the same day, to see how members voted and whether their comments suggest a rate rise later this year or early next year.
U.S. June Budget Expected to Record a Surplus On Friday, the Treasury Department will release its estimate of federal spending and tax receipts in June, with a $96 billion surplus expected. The June data, which follows a $130 billion shortfall in May, is expected to be helped by strong gains in income tax and corporate tax collections, offset by a moderate rise in spending. The month of May contains no major tax due dates. For fiscal 2014, which ends in September, the federal government is expected to run a deficit of roughly $500 billion, a considerable improvement from Washington's $680 billion budget gap in fiscal 2013.
For the latest updates, go to dealbook.nytimes.com »