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Jul 5, 2014

YouTube | Al Jazeera English - July 5, 2014: Islamic State: Undermining Syrian revolution?



Al Jazeera English has uploaded Islamic State: Undermining Syrian revolution?

Islamic State: Undermining Syrian revolution?
Al Jazeera English

An Al-Qaeda offshoot is accused of fighting rival groups more than Syrian security forces. Folly Bah Thibault speaks to Isabel Nassief - research analyst at the Institute for the Study of War; Abdullah Al Andalusi - political analyst and Islamic Affairs Specialist; and Shiraz Maher - senior research fellow at the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation at Kings College London.

The Economist | Insights: Weekly Digest - Published on July 4, 2014.

The Economist

The Economist
Weekly Digest
Issue #34
This week we investigate how businesses can improve their decision-making capabilities; we examine links between environmental change and human health; and we invite you to New Delhi to discuss the new political landscape in India and what it means for business, the economy, foreign affairs, politics and society.
Analysis
Taking decisions collaboratively builds consensus and reduces risk Decisive action, a report written by The Economist Intelligence Unit and sponsored by Applied Predictive Technologies (APT), examines how businesses really make decisions, and how they can improve their decision-making capabilities.

flu image
Fraud reportTackling hepatitis C
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report imageAncient enemy, modern imperative
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report imageSeismic shifts in investment management
Read more →
report imageEvolution of Work and the Worker
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View all analysis >>
Opinion
logoImproving links between environment and human health
...a further shift in the trajectories of our natural world could impact planetary systems so severely that current forms of human civilization would be in jeopardy.

Robert Garris, Managing Director, Bellagio Programs,, The Rockefeller Foundation
Read the full article>>
report imageWhat are the barriers to better control of tuberculosis? Watch our exclusive video to find out
Read more →
report imageSkills Gap Challenge - submit your $10,000 idea to bridge the skills gap between higher education and employment
Read more →
report imageElectricity supply
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report imageSearching for growth
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View all opinions >>

YouTube | RT The Keiser Report: Cheap 'Potato Wedge' Money (E623)



RT has uploaded Keiser Report: Cheap 'Potato Wedge' Money (E623)


Keiser Report: Cheap 'Potato Wedge' Money (E623)
RT

In this episode of the Keiser Report, Max Keiser and Stacy Herbert discuss the central banking model of passing off downmarket potato wedges of cheap money for high-end, luxury housing bubbles. No value has been added, no wealth created and yet the fraud continues. They talk about the reverse process of taking the National Health Service in the UK and turning it into a downmarket privatised entity. In the second half, Max interviews Jeffrey Sommers, professor at University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee about a new book he's edited with Charles Woolfson called, "The Contradictions of Austerity: The Socio-Economic Costs of the Neoliberal Baltic Model." In particular, they discuss the economic miracle that is NOT Latvia and how Swedish bankers are acting as conquistadors in Latvia.

NYT | Today's Headlines. - July 5, 2014: Obama Weighs Steps to Cover Contraception.

The New York TimesMost Popular | Video |

Today's Headlines

Saturday, July 5, 2014


Top News
Demonstrators gathered outside the Supreme Court on Monday, following the court's decision on the Hobby Lobby case.
Obama Weighs Steps to Cover Contraception

By ROBERT PEAR and ADAM LIPTAK

The Obama administration, reeling from decisions by the Supreme Court, is weighing options to provide contraceptive coverage to women who are about to lose it or never had it because of their employers' religious objections.
. Document: The Court's Order on Contraception Rule
Tom Steyer, the billionaire philanthropist and environmentalist, divested his holdings in companies that produce fossil fuels.
Aims of Donor Are Shadowed by Past in Coal

By MICHAEL BARBARO and CORAL DAVENPORT

Though the environmentalist Tom Steyer has vowed to sell his investments in companies that generate fossil fuels, the projects his hedge fund bankrolled may emit carbon for decades to come.

CRITIC'S NOTEBOOK

Refugee Camp for Syrians in Jordan Evolves as a Do-It-Yourself City

By MICHAEL KIMMELMAN

As the sprawling Zaatari camp evolves into an informal city - with an economy and even gentrification - aid workers say camps can be potential urban incubators that benefit host countries like Jordan.
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »
Editors' Picks
Scott Newman, center, manager of the Boloco burrito restaurant in Concord, N.H., said the above-average pay enabled him to pick from among many talented job applicants.

BUSINESS

Paying Employees to Stay, Not to Go

By STEVEN GREENHOUSE and STEPHANIE STROM

Restaurants like Shake Shack and Boloco that offer their employees above-average pay say they have lower turnover and better customer service.

OPINION | OP-ED CONTRIBUTORS

How to Prevent Summer Blackouts

By EREZ YOELI, MOSHE HOFFMAN and DAVID RAND

We can install a tiny device, and have a little concern for what our neighbors think of us.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY

"You can hear people running their sprinklers when it's dark because they don't want to get caught watering when they're not supposed to be - it's maddening."
LORETTA FRANZI of Sacramento, one of the California cities where neighbors are encouraged to report one another's water waste.
Today's Video
Video VIDEO: Vows | The Wedding Watchers
Every summer Grand Army Plaza in Brooklyn attracts wedding parties as a backdrop for pictures. For decades Rhoda Hill, 79, and her fellow wedding watchers have enjoyed the spectacle.
For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »
ADVERTISEMENT
World
German Man Arrested as Spy Implicates U.S.

By ALISON SMALE

German news media reported that the man, 31, worked for Germany's intelligence service and was suspected of spying for the United States.
Mourners carried the body of Muhammad Abu Khdeir, covered with a Palestinian flag, during a funeral ceremony on Friday.
Tensions High in Jerusalem as Palestinian Teenager Is Given a Martyr's Burial

By JODI RUDOREN

The funeral for Muhammad Hussein Abu Khdeir, widely presumed to have been killed in an act of retaliation, was seen as a potential flash point.
Poised to Gain in Iraq Crisis, Kurds Face New Barriers to Autonomy

By TIM ARANGO and CLIFFORD KRAUSS

Although exporting its vast oil supply would give the Kurdish government leverage in its push for sovereignty, opposition from other nations has left the region's future uncertain.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »
U.S.
Ron Carpenter, a Sacramento city inspector, responding to a watering complaint. Californians are turning in their neighbors.
Californians Keep Up With Joneses' Water Use

By IAN LOVETT

In the five months since a drought emergency was declared, Californians have barely cut their water consumption, leading some residents to get personal about waste.
David Parks, right, who runs the Prairie Grove Telephone Company in Arkansas, with an employee, Patrick Smith, in the company's warehouse.

THIS LAND

A Town Won't Let Go of a Coin-Drop Line to the Past

By DAN BARRY

The Prairie Grove Telephone Company in Arkansas is working to resurrect its last phone booth after it was damaged by a car.
College Group Run for Profit Looks to Close or Sell Schools

By RICHARD PÉREZ-PEÑA

Corinthian Colleges, under an agreement with the Education Department, will sell almost 100 schools in the United States and Canada, and it will close a dozen others.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »

Politics
Senator Thad Cochran speaking at a rally in Jackson, Miss., in June. His defeated challenger is seeking a revote.
Unease in G.O.P. Over Mississippi Tea Party Anger

By JONATHAN WEISMAN

Many conservatives are angry about the runoff Senator Thad Cochran won, his challenger is contesting the result, and some Democrats see an opportunity to exploit the divide.
Bill Clinton and Al Gore at the Democratic National Convention in New York in 1992.

POLITICAL MEMO

Shut Out of White House, G.O.P. Looks to Democrats of 1992

By JOHN HARWOOD

By 2016, Democrats' stretch of presidential advantage will have lasted 24 years, and one of the biggest questions in American politics is how close Republicans are to ending it.
An F-35A Lightening II joint strike fighter at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida in 2012.
New Delay for F-35 Jets as Defense Department Grounds Fleet After a Fire

By ANDREW SIDDONS and HELENE COOPER

The grounding is the latest in a long string of delays that has plagued the Air Force's newest, and most advanced, fighter aircraft.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »
Business
On average, more than 100,000 piglets and young hogs have been killed each week by the virus, which first showed up in Iowa in 2013.
Virus Plagues the Pork Industry, and Environmentalists

By STEPHANIE STROM

A disease is killing huge numbers of piglets and young hogs, and environmental groups worry about the effects on groundwater of the buried carcasses.
The University of Colorado Boulder, where the administration has tightened rules for students seeking in-state tuition rates.

YOUR MONEY

Services Emerge to Help Out-of-State Students Pay In-State Tuition

By RON LIEBER

Companies like In-State Angels are trying to help students and parents avoid the high price of out-of-state tuition, but some colleges frown on it.
Eric T. Schneiderman, the New York attorney general, announcing a lawsuit last month that charges Barclays with fraud.

COMMON SENSE

Barclays Suit Sheds Light on Trading in Shadows

By JAMES B. STEWART

Barclays' dark pool seems to have catered to high-frequency traders, the very participants it claimed to protect against, a lawsuit contends.
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »
Technology
In recent months, Weibo has been eclipsed by WeChat, which allows instant messaging within self-selected circles of followers.
An Online Shift in China Muffles an Open Forum

By IAN JOHNSON

A turn from the microblogging service Sina Weibo to the Facebook-like WeChat has reoriented the nation's social media landscape from public to semiprivate communication.
Google Reinstates European Links to Articles From The Guardian

By MARK SCOTT

As the search engine restores links that it had removed to comply with a court order, its handling of the "right to be forgotten" becomes murkier.
. Google Starts Erasing Links for Searches in Europe
Regulators said that T-Mobile ignored
Now on Your Cellphone Bill, Services You Never Wanted

By BRIAN X. CHEN

Regulators say unauthorized charges, long a bane of landline accounts, have become a growing nuisance for mobile users as well.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »
Sports
The Brazilian forward Neymar after injuring his back late in the second half. Neymar, who had four goals in the World Cup, fractured his vertebra and will miss the rest of the tournament.

BRAZIL 2, COLOMBIA 1

Brazil Takes a Painful Step Forward

By ANDREW KEH

Brazil dispatched an upstart Colombia team, 2-1, but lost its star player for the rest of the tournament.
. Hard Dose of Reality Impinges on Brazil's Fairy Tale Victory
Germany striker Thomas Müller, center, fighting for possession with France defender Patrice Evra and midfielder Blaise Matuidi.

GERMANY 1, FRANCE 0

Germany Wins a Battle of the Old Guard

By SAM BORDEN

France was never able to get its attack clicking as Germany prevailed Friday and will go on to face Brazil.
. Match Recap
Novak Djokovic beat Grigor Dimitrov and will meet Roger Federer in the final.
The Men's Final Remains in Familiar Hands

By JOHN BRANCH

The veterans stopped the rising stars as Novak Djokovic defeated Grigor Dimitrov, 6-4, 3-6, 7-6 (2), 7-6 (7), and Roger Federer beat Milos Raonic, 6-4, 6-4, 6-4.
. For Inspiration, the United States Should Probably Look North
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »
Arts
Bill Nighy and Carey Mulligan in David Hare's

THEATER REVIEW | 'SKYLIGHT'

Volatile Chemistry in an Underheated Flat

By BEN BRANTLEY

A new production of David Hare's "Skylight," at Wyndham's Theater in London, stars Bill Nighy and Carey Mulligan.
Richard Chamberlain in

WATCH LIST

Diving for Treasure in Less Traveled Seas

By MIKE HALE

Exploring offerings from six boutique streaming services, from a Scottish mystery to a movie from a cult Japanese director.
Ernest Hemingway, left, in 1925 with friends - and his wife at the time, Hadley Richardson Hemingway, center - in Spain.
Edition Has Alternate Opening of 'Sun Also Rises'

By PATRICIA COHEN

A new edition of Ernest Hemingway's 1926 novel, to be released this month, includes his original first chapter.
For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »