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Feb 22, 2014

NYT | Asian Morning Today's Top Headlines February 23, 2014: Ukraine's Leader Flees the Capital; Elections Are Called

The New York Times
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Sunday, February 23, 2014


Top News
Protesters at the residence of Ukraine's president, Viktor F. Yanukovych, which was seized and open to the public in Kiev, Ukraine, on Saturday.
Ukraine's Leader Flees the Capital; Elections Are Called

By ANDREW HIGGINS and ANDREW E. KRAMER

Former Prime Minister Yulia V. Tymoshenko was released from prison, and Parliament found President Viktor F. Yanukovych unable to fulfill his duties and set an election for May 25 after he fled the capital.
Out of a Broken Promise And an Old Fight: Chaos

By DAVID M. HERSZENHORN

Three core factors led to the chaos in Ukraine: a broken promise between a leader and his people, a lingering Cold War-era fight, and public outrage at the government's response to protests.
President Obama talked for an hour on Friday with President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia.
Amid Fence-Mending, Another U.S.-Russia Rift

By PETER BAKER

The political crisis in Ukraine has underscored the difficulties of restoring constructive ties between Washington and Moscow.
For more top news, go to INYT.com
Editors' Picks

OPINION | EDITORIAL

Muzzling Speech in India

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

The wanton abuse of laws restricting expression is creating a climate of fear.

WORLD

Video VIDEO: Protecting the Square
In Kiev, Ukraine, the opposition fighters in Independence Square are considered heroes by many supporters of the movement.
World

NEWS ANALYSIS

With President's Departure, Ukraine Looks Toward a Murky Future

By ANDREW HIGGINS

Gone along with President Viktor F. Yanukovych was any trace of a Friday peace deal that had sought to freeze the country's tumult.
Growing Support, and Tea From Young Women, Embolden Kiev Street Fighters

By ANDREW E. KRAMER

Young men on the front lines of the antigovernment protest said the adulation expressed by many people in Ukraine's capital has inspired them to keep fighting.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World
Business
A rapid growth of oyster farms on the East and West Coasts has contributed to their rise in popularity.
Loss Leaders on the Half Shell

By KAREN STABINER

A nationwide binge on oysters is transforming an industry (and restaurants' economics).
Wisconsin's Legacy for Unions

By STEVEN GREENHOUSE

Could a law that so swiftly deflated unions' power become the pattern for other states? It's labor's worst fear.
As Crisis Loomed, Yellen Made Wry and Forceful Calls for Action

By NATHANIEL POPPER

Janet Yellen was a nonvoting member of the Federal Reserve's policy-making committee as global finances soured, but she called for swift action and disarmed critics with gallows humor.
For more business news, go to INYT.com/Business
Technology
Mark King of Bellingham, Wash., says General Mills' decision to have him develop a texture analyzer was life-changing.

THE IDEA

A Young Inventor, Finding the Crunch Factor

By JACK HITT

How should General Mills gauge the texture of its granola bars? An inventor in his 20s has come up with an answer.
Alba González Camacho, 21, posted messages calling for politicians to be killed.
In a First for Spain, a Woman Is Convicted of Inciting Terror Over Twitter

By RAPHAEL MINDER

The case is one of a recent handful that have pushed social media into courtrooms worldwide and raised issues of the limits of speech on the Internet.
Mediation Fails for Samsung and Apple

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

The smartphone makers told a federal judge in California that their latest patent dispute remained unresolved, pointing them toward a trial in March.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Tech
ADVERTISEMENT
Sports
Michael Sam told the news media in Indianapolis on Saturday he wanted to be seen as

SPORTS OF THE TIMES

Three Stand as Test Cases for the Hidebound N.F.L.

By WILLIAM C. RHODEN

Richard Sherman, Jonathan Martin and Michael Sam are young African-American players who can introduce much-needed change in the league.
At N.F.L. Combine, Michael Sam Says He Wants Focus on Field

By BEN STRAUSS

In a session that lasted more than 12 minutes, Sam conducted his first news conference since he publicly declared that he was gay.
Hialeah's Fabled Track Seeks a Rebirth

By BARRY BEARAK

Hialeah Park, once a magnet for Palm Beach socialites, has begun to revive its fortunes with quarter horse racing and a profitable casino.
For more sports news, go to INYT.com/Sports
U.S. News
A florist would not provide flowers for the wedding last year of Robert Ingersoll, left, and Curt Freed, leading to a lawsuit.
Religious Right in Arizona Cheers Bill Allowing Businesses to Refuse to Serve Gays

By MICHAEL PAULSON and FERNANDA SANTOS

Gov. Jan Brewer of Arizona must decide whether to sign the legislation that would allow religious beliefs as a legal justification for denying service to same-sex couples.
The proposals of city leaders envision tearing down tens of thousands blighted buildings, but do not contemplate whether Detroit's footprint should shrink.
Detroit Outlines Map to Solvency, Stressing Repair

By MONICA DAVEY and MARY WILLIAMS WALSH

The city presented its bankruptcy judge with the first official road map to its future: a plan for settling its debt and making Detroit livable again.
. Documents  Document: Disclosure Statement for Detroit
A noose was found last weekend on the statue of James Meredith, the first black student to attend the University of Mississippi.
Ole Miss Students May Face Charges in Racist Episode

By ALAN BLINDER

The university said three freshmen from Georgia were refusing to speak with investigators about the desecration of a statue honoring the college's first black student.
. Racist Episodes Continue to Stir Ole Miss Campus
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US
Opinion

OPINION

When Doctors Need to Lie

By SANDEEP JAUHAR

Misleading your patient? Defying his wishes? Sometimes in medicine these things are necessary.

TODAY'S EDITORIALS

What the Stimulus Accomplished

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

Though ridiculed by Republicans, the 2009 Recovery Act saved the American economy.
Ross Douthat

OP-ED COLUMNIST

The Games Putin Plays

By ROSS DOUTHAT

The events in Ukraine offer a lesson in the limits of Russia's grand strategy.
. Columnist Page | Blog
For more opinion, go to INYT.com/Opinion

Koos Jansen: In China 'people are buying gold like groceries': GATA | THE GATA DISPATCH February 22, 2014.

Koos Jansen: In China 'people are buying gold like groceries'

Submitted by cpowell on 02:04PM ET Saturday, February 22, 2014. Section: Daily Dispatches
5p ET Saturday, February 22, 2014
Gold researcher and GATA consultant Koos Jansen reports today that China's gold offtake continues to exceed world gold mine production. He publishes photographs taken in recent days by his contacts and their friends and relatives at gold shops in China, demonstrating that, as one contact says, "People are buying gold like groceries." Jansen's report is posted at his Internet site, In Gold We Trust, here:
CHRIS POWELL, Secretary/Treasurer
Gold Anti-Trust Action Committee Inc.

Bloomberg | Share The View February 22, 2013: Obama and Iran

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SHARE THE VIEW
A quick look at Bloomberg News's opinion section
February 22, 2014For more, visit www.bloomberg.com/view»
IRAN: Jeffrey Goldberg: "I still believe that there are circumstances in which Obama would use force to stop Iran from gaining possession of a nuclear weapon. ... There are certainly circumstances -- two immediately come to mind -- in which I think he would use force to prevent the Middle East from falling into a destructive spiral of nuclear proliferation." Read more

UKRAINE: Now that Ukraine's protesters have forced concessions from the government, can Russian President Vladimir Putin hold on to power? Leonid Bershidsky: "Russians, both Putin supporters and opponents, will now grapple with the question of how relevant the Ukrainian example is to them." Read more 

BIG FOOD: Last week, Politico reported that lawyers are pitching the attorneys general in 16 states with the idea of a massive lawsuit against fast-food companies. Megan McArdle: "Don't start stockpiling the Ho-Hos just yet." Read more 

2016 ELECTION: "Is Rick Santorum a viable presidential candidate?" Jonathan Bernstein: "Santorum certainly qualifies on policy. ... No, the question for Santorum is whether he has conventional credentials." Read more 

GROUPON: "It was ugly today for Groupon Inc. shares: They tumbled 22 percent, shaving off about $1.5 billion in market value,"Matthew C. Klein writes. "No matter how you look at Groupon's results, the company continues to burn through tens of millions of dollars in cash." Read more 

WHATSAPP: Margaret Carlson: "To express bewilderment or astonishment from now on, I suggest using the phrase, 'WhatsApp?' (with the voice rising on 'App'). It's cleaner than 'WTF' and everyone will know what I mean." Read more 

HILLARY CLINTON: Albert R. Hunt: "The Hillary-Clinton-for-President crowd has several causes for concern; none of them involve Monica Lewinsky." Read more 

NYT | Breaking News February 22, 2014: Ukraine’s President Flees Palace as Protesters Widen Control.

The New York Times|BREAKING NEWS 

BREAKING NEWSSaturday, February 22, 2014 6:02 AM EST
Ukraine’s President Flees Palace as Protesters Widen Control
An opposition unit took control of the presidential palace outside Kiev on Saturday, as leaders in Parliament said Ukraine’s president, Viktor F. Yanukovych, had fled the capital a day after a deal was reached aimed at ending the country’s spiral of violence.
Members of an opposition group from Lviv called the 31st Hundred — carrying clubs and some of them wearing masks — were in control of the entryways to the palace Saturday morning. And Vitali Klitschko, one of three opposition leaders who signed the deal to end the violence, said that Mr. Yanukovych had “left the capital” but his whereabouts were unknown, with members of the opposition speculating that he had gone to Kharkiv, in the northeast part of Ukraine.
Protesters claimed to have established control over Kiev. By Saturday morning they had secured key intersections of the city and the government district of the capital, which police officers had fled, leaving behind burned military trucks, mattresses and heaps of garbage at the positions they had occupied for months.

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http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/23/world/europe/ukraine.html?emc=edit_na_20140222