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Feb 9, 2014

NYT | Asian Morning Today's Headlines February 09, 2014: Business: The Tax Wilderness, Untamed

The New York Times
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Monday, February 10, 2014


Top News
A judge in Bauchi, in mostly Muslim northern Nigeria, re-enacted the lashing of a man convicted of homosexuality.
Wielding Whip and a Hard New Law, Nigeria Tries to 'Sanitize' Itself of Gays

By ADAM NOSSITER

Since Nigeria's president signed a law criminalizing homosexuality, arrests of gay people have multiplied and demands for a crackdown have flourished.
Officials say Mr. Snowden used
Snowden Used Low-Cost Tool to Best N.S.A.

By DAVID E. SANGER and ERIC SCHMITT

Edward J. Snowden gathered National Security Agency secrets using cheap and widely available "web crawler" software, a breach that should have easily been detected, investigators say.
. N.S.A. Program Gathers Data on a Third of Nation's Calls, Officials Say
President François Hollande of France is apparently coming stag to a White House state dinner, which complicates things.

WHITE HOUSE MEMO

French Breakup Makes a Dinner Harder to Do

By PETER BAKER

President François Hollande of France will apparently be coming stag to a White House state dinner, which complicates more than just seating.
For more top news, go to INYT.com
Editors' Picks
At Fisht Olympic Stadium for the Sochi Games opening ceremony, domes were inspired by St. Basil's Cathedral.

OPINION | QUICK HISTORY

The Games Begin in Russia, and an Actor's Life Ends in New York

By SERGE SCHMEMANN

Sporting events in New Jersey and Russia and a sad loss for the arts.

T MAGAZINE

Video VIDEO: Fashion Week Profile | J. Mendel
The story of J. Mendel stretches across three world capitals and more than 140 years. Gilles Mendel, the head designer, explains the unusual thinking and process behind the brand's designs.
World
Delowar Hossain has said that just three stories of his garment plant were legal.
Months After Deadly Fire, Owners of Bangladesh Factory Surrender to Authorities

By JULFIKAR ALI MANIK and ELLEN BARRY

Delowar Hossain and his wife, Mahmuda Akther, the owners of the Tazreen factory, face homicide charges in the 2012 blaze, which killed 112 employees.
Britain's Immigration Minister Resigns Over Employing Illegal Immigrant

By JENNY ANDERSON

Mark Harper, who had led a crackdown that urged illegal immigrants to "go home," stepped down after revealing that his house cleaner of six years had been living in the country illegally.
2 Are Wounded in Israeli Airstrike in Gaza

By ISABEL KERSHNER

The target of the strike by the Israeli military, a Palestinian militant accused of firing rockets into Israel, was critically wounded, along with a bystander.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World
Business
The Tax Wilderness, Untamed

By JONATHAN WEISMAN

Conflicting priorities in Washington still stand in the way of the tax code's redesign.
. Go to Special Report: Your Taxes
. Documents  Document: A Guide to Running the 1040 Race
Facing Criticism, AOL Chief Reverses Change to 401(k) Plan

By LESLIE KAUFMAN

AOL had recently altered its 401(k) program, and its chief executive, Tim Armstrong, apologized for linking the move to soaring medical costs associated with two families' "distressed babies."
Doug Click says his company, Arizona Hi-Lift, made good use of a Section 179 tax provision that  expired at the end of last year.
For Small Businesses, a Road Without a Map

By CONRAD DE AENLLE

Unless and until Congress renews all sorts of deductions, tax specialists warn, it will be hard for small businesses to plan for expansion.
For more business news, go to INYT.com/Business
Technology
From left, Aaron Ginn and Chris Abrams of Lincoln Labs, which tries to identify and recruit conservatives and Republicans within the tech world.
Republicans Are Wooing the Wired

By MATT RICHTEL and NICHOLAS CONFESSORE

In 2012, Democrats took a commanding lead in technological outreach to voters. Bruised Republicans are now trying to build their own bench - but in Silicon Valley, it's not easy.
To avoid constantly checking email and Twitter in the middle of the night, a traditional alarm clock may be a better choice for the bedroom than a smartphone.

DISRUPTIONS

For a Restful Night, Make Your Smartphone Sleep on the Couch

By NICK BILTON

Many Americans now bring their smartphones into the bedroom, especially to use them as alarm clocks. But that may be a recipe for insomnia, studies show.
Tristan Walker, who wants to revolutionize the skin-care and beauty-product industry for African-Americans, sees value and opportunity in appealing to an audience that Silicon Valley often overlooks.

BITS

Search for a Market Niche, and You Might Find a Crowd

By JENNA WORTHAM

For entrepreneurs, an overlooked target market may open broader doors to success.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Tech
ADVERTISEMENT
Sports
Ahn Hyun-soo, now Viktor Ahn, will compete in the men's 1,500-meter race on Monday.
Ahn Rejected U.S. to Skate for Russia

By SAM BORDEN

The speedskating star Ahn Hyun-soo chose Russia over the United States and changed his name to Viktor after switching allegiance from South Korea in 2011.
Russian skaters celebrated winning the gold medal in team competition on Sunday.
Russia Wins First Gold in Sochi in Team Figure Skating

By JERÉ LONGMAN

Russia won the long program in men's, women's and pairs competition for a resounding victory in the team event, a restorative achievement for a nation that had failed to win a single gold medal in 2010.
. With Team Skating, It's Now Kiss, Cry, Squeeze In
Matthias Mayer of Austria soared during his gold-medal-winning run in the men's downhill.
Misstep Costs Bode Miller a Medal as Austrian Wins Downhill

By BILL PENNINGTON

Matthias Mayer of Austria, an unheralded 23-year-old, won the men's downhill, while the American Bode Miller faltered and placed eighth.
. Inside the Rings: For Austrians, Downhill Is the Extreme Sport to Own
. Graphic  Graphic: The Men's Downhill, Side by Side
For more sports news, go to INYT.com/Sports
U.S. News
SIGNS OF STRUGGLE The makeshift shelter of a homeless person in downtown Ponce, a city on Puerto Rico's southern coast.
Economy and Crime Spur New Puerto Rican Exodus

By LIZETTE ALVAREZ

Puerto Rico's extended woes, including high unemployment and pervasive crime, are causing a worrisome exodus of professionals and middle-class residents to places like Florida and Texas.
More Federal Privileges to Extend to Same-Sex Couples

By MATT APUZZO

Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. was preparing to issue policies aimed at eliminating the distinction between same- and opposite-sex married couples in the federal criminal justice system.
A Battle of Ideology in a City Unaccustomed to That Sort of Election

By JENNIFER MEDINA

The current race for mayor, between a Latino Democrat and a business-oriented Republican, is in many ways a fight for San Diego's political soul.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US
Opinion

OPINION

After War, a Failure of the Imagination

By PHIL KLAY

Why separate veterans from the rest of mankind?

EDITORIAL

The Case for a Higher Minimum Wage

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

An increase would help 27.8 million people. It would also help balance power in the workplace.
. Interactive  Interactive Feature: Can You Live on the Minimum Wage?
Frank Bruni

OP-ED COLUMNIST

A Pope You Can Eat

By FRANK BRUNI

Francis has sensed the world's appetite for a sweeter kind of sermon.
. Columnist Page | Blog
For more opinion, go to INYT.com/Opinion



Venezuela has its gold, if not toilet paper, but what about Germany?: GATA | THE GATA DISPATCH February 09, 2014. Corrected Date

Venezuela has its gold, if not toilet paper, but what about Germany?

Submitted by cpowell on 09:21AM ET Sunday, February 9, 2014. Section: Daily Dispatches
12:34p ET Sunday, February 9, 2014
Dear Friend of GATA and Gold:
Responding to suggestions last week from Germany's Bundesbank that it must repatriate its gold slowly from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York for security reasons, possibly at a rate of no more than 1 tonne per week over six years --
-- GATA's friend and consultant R.M. recalls how fast Venezuela managed to repatriate its gold from the Bank of England and other banks over the same expanse of ocean in 2012.
The Bloomberg News story appended here reports on the arrival in Caracas on January 30, 2012, of the final shipment of Venezuela's gold, 14 tonnes carried on a single flight. Bloomberg quotes the president of Venezuela's central bank, Nelson Merentes, as saying: "In two months we've brought 160 tons of gold valued at around $9 billion back to Venezuela."
By contrast, the Bundesbank first planned to take seven years to recover 300 tonnes from the New York Fed. If Venezuela's pace had been adopted, the Bundesbank could have recovered those 300 tonnes in four months, and, if it has been so inclined, could have recovered its remaining 1,200 tonnes at the New York Fed in another 15 months or so.
R.M. calculates that Venezuela's final 14 tonnes were valued at the time at about $774 million, more eggs than most people would want to put in a single basket. But cargo planes, civilian and military, fly over the oceans every day, and civilian and military ships sail them every day with a safety record even better than that of cargo aircraft.
So one must suspect that security really isn't the reason for the slow pace of the Bundesbank's gold repatriation from the New York Fed -- that the reason is that, as fund manager, geopolitical strategist, and author James G. Rickards has speculated, the Bundesbank really doesn't want its gold back from the New York Fed and that the nominal repatriation is meant only to ease political clamor in Germany. Or one must suspect that, as many supposedly paranoid gold bugs believe, the German gold is no longer available, having been overcommitted in the fractional-reserve gold banking system of the Western central bank gold price suppression scheme.
Of course the latter explanation also could be why the Bundesbank might not really want its gold back any time soon. What an embarrassment, scandal, and financial loss the truth might be.
In any case, when it comes to gold repatriation, Venezuela, whose collapsing command economy lately has forced people to rush over to Colombia in search of basic foodstuffs and consumer items, mocks the famous German efficiency. Venezuela may not have toilet paper but it has its gold -- at least until it tries to raise money for toilet paper by leasing its gold to some agent of Western gold price suppression. Are Germany's gold certificates from the New York Fed worth more than toilet paper?
CHRIS POWELL, Secretary/Treasurer
Gold Anti-Trust Action Committee Inc.

Trade With Precision (TWP) February 9, 2014 (Corrected date): Watch this week's market commentary videos & webinars.


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