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Feb 2, 2014

Trade With Precision (TWR) This week's Market Commentary videos and Webinars February 02, 2014.


from Trade With Precision - www.tradewithprecision.com

Watch this week's market commentary videos where Craig Cobb provides a market outlook for the week ahead on the Russell 2000 and US Equity Markets along with the US Dollar Index.

Also remember to register for this week's webinars below:
Intraday Trading Myths Exposed runs on:
How To Become A Successful Trader runs on:

NYT | Asian Morning Today's Headlines February 2, 2014: Netanyahu Criticizes Kerry Over Boycott Remarks

The New York Times
NYT Apps|
The New York Times

Today's Headlines

Monday, February 3, 2014


Top News
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu at a weekly cabinet meeting in Jerusalem on Sunday.
Netanyahu Criticizes Kerry Over Boycott Remarks

By ISABEL KERSHNER

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu criticized Secretary of State John Kerry for warning that Israel could face more foreign boycotts if the peace process fails.
. Kerry and Hagel Defend U.S. Engagement Abroad in Face of Criticism
Philip Seymour Hoffman at the Sundance Film Festival last month, for the premiere of
Philip Seymour Hoffman, Actor, Dies at 46

By BRUCE WEBER and J. DAVID GOODMAN

Mr. Hoffman was found dead of an apparent drug overdose. A police official said investigators found a syringe in his arm and an envelope containing what is believed to be heroin.
. Photographs  Slide Show: Philip Seymour Hoffman on Stage
Arriving at Mount Miaofeng, on what used to be a great pilgrimage route, a girl dressed to perform at the temple there took a break from the trek uphill.
In China, 'Once the Villages Are Gone, the Culture Is Gone'

By IAN JOHNSON

Rapid urbanization in China means village life, the bedrock of Chinese culture, is rapidly vanishing, and with it, traditions and history.
. Video  Video: Relocating Traditions in China
For more top news, go to INYT.com
Editors' Picks

SPORTS

Video VIDEO: Super Bowl XLVIII, by the Numbers
There is a lot you can learn about the Super Bowl in just over two minutes. Here are the most important figures to know about the big game.

OPINION | OPINION

Ashes to Ashes, but First a Nice Pine Box

By JEFFREY M. PIEHLER

Building my own coffin was a way to accept death and celebrate life.
World
Death Toll Climbs After Major Volcanic Eruption in Indonesia

By JOE COCHRANE

Toxic clouds of hot ash hampered teams searching for survivors from Saturday's eruption at Mount Sinabung, which killed at least 15 people.
Members of the far-right party Golden Dawn carried party flags and Greek flags at a rally in Athens on Saturday night.
Greece's Far-Right Party Tries to Evade Government Crackdown With a New Name

By LIZ ALDERMAN

Golden Dawn announced the formation of a new political party as a way to circumvent possible efforts by the government to outlaw the organization.
Petroswickonicovick Wandeckerkof da Silva Santos has also turned heads as a soccer prodigy.
His Friends Know Him as Petroswickonicovick

By SIMON ROMERO

Carrying an extraordinary name is remarkably widespread in Brazil. Just ask Wonarllevyston Garlan Marllon Branddon Bruno Paullynelly Mell Oliveira Pereira.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World
Business
Pharrell Williams, left, and members of Daft Punk, at the Grammys last month. Its broadcast drew 28.5 million viewers.

THE MEDIA EQUATION

Super Bowl Underscores the Big Business of Must-See, Live TV

By DAVID CARR

At a time of atomization and endless special-interest hobbit holes, big live television events like the Super Bowl fulfill our need for something, anything, in common.
Built in 1929, the year of the Great Crash, by a grandfather of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, the 19-story apartment building at 740 Park Avenue stands today like an exclusive club for the fabulously wealthy.
With Fortune Falling, a 1 Percent Divorce

By JULIE CRESWELL

Liz and Kent Swig swiftly scaled the heights of Manhattan real estate and social life. Then the market's walls closed in.
New Venture to Mine Twitter Data to Find Music's Next Big Thing

By BEN SISARIO

Twitter and 300, a new company started by Lyor Cohen, one of music's biggest power brokers, announced a partnership that hopes to analyze users' posts to identify promising talent.
For more business news, go to INYT.com/Business
Technology
Tom Wheeler, the chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, which might appeal a ruling that limits how it regulates broadband providers.

BITS BLOG

Disruptions: Paying to Travel in the Internet's Fast Lanes

By NICK BILTON

Has the Internet become so fundamental to our lives that it is, in essence, a utility that should be subject to regulation?
F.C.C. Says It Will Double Spending on High-Speed Internet in Schools and Libraries

By EDWARD WYATT

Financing for an increase to $2 billion a year will come from restructuring the $2.4 billion E-Rate program.

TECHNOPHORIA

When No One Is Just a Face in the Crowd

By NATASHA SINGER

Facial recognition technology may soon help stores track their best customers - and that has privacy advocates concerned.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Tech
ADVERTISEMENT
Sports
Adam Gase, left, designed and Peyton Manning directed the most productive offense in N.F.L. history.
An Unconventional Path to Scripting the Broncos' Offense

By BILL PENNINGTON

Adam Gase, 35, the Broncos' innovative offensive coordinator, is among a small group of expert coaches who hardly ever played the game.
. Video  Video: Peyton Manning and His Offensive Coordinator
. The Matrix of Manning
. A Family of Punters Demonstrates the Heredity of Hang Time
Nodar Kumaritashvili's gravestone depicts him on a luge beneath the Olympic rings. Pigs and cattle walk over the grave, his family said.
A Swift and Fatal Luge Plunge, and Then an Abyss of Sorrow

By SAM BORDEN

Nodar Kumaritashvili of Georgia died at 21 in a luge crash as he practiced for the 2010 Winter Olympics, a tragedy that stunned the sports world and left his family seeking answers.
Defensive tackle Terrance Knighton of Denver, center, is a key to the Broncos' hopes of throttling Marshawn Lynch, whose punishing rushes might otherwise sustain long drives for the Seahawks.
Denver's Offense (Unstoppable) vs. Seattle's Defense (Unmovable)

By BEN SHPIGEL

Seattle's hopes of containing the league's best offense hinge on its ability to mount long drives, and its N.F.L.-leading defense's success in hurrying Peyton Manning and jamming Bronco receivers.
. Super Bowl XLVIII Matchup: Seahawks vs. Broncos
. Photographs  Slide Show: A Supersize Celebration in Manhattan
For more sports news, go to INYT.com/Sports
U.S. News
Severe Drought Has U.S. West Fearing Worst

By ADAM NAGOURNEY and IAN LOVETT

With no sign of rain, 17 rural California communities providing water to 40,000 people are in danger of running out within 60 to 120 days.
Gov. Mark Dayton, center, at a forum last month in Duluth, Minn., where problems with the state insurance exchange was a topic.
Glitches in State Exchanges Give G.O.P. a Cudgel

By ABBY GOODNOUGH

State-run health insurance exchanges are now the biggest laggards in fixing enrollment problems, and Republicans have vowed to make them an election issue.
Karl Rove, the founder of Crossroads, in 2012.
Fund-Raising by G.O.P. Rebels Outpaces Party Establishment

By NICHOLAS CONFESSORE

Underscoring a potential shift of power in the Republican Party, candidates are counting on outside groups critical of the leadership for campaign muscle.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US
Opinion

OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

Losing the Propaganda War

By HIRSH GOODMAN

Brands are more powerful than truth, and Israel's actions encourage the apartheid label.

OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

Why Israel Fears the Boycott

By OMAR BARGHOUTI

Only economic pressure will end an unjust order.

TODAY'S EDITORIALS

What G.O.P.-Style Reform Looks Like

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

An alternative plan falls far short of what the existing health care law already provides.
. Making Surveillance a Little Less Opaque
. A Ghastly Injustice in India
For more opinion, go to INYT.com/Opinion

Gerald Celente | Trends in The News February 02, 2014: Gerald Celente has uploaded Gerald Celente - Trends In The News - "America's Spiritual Death" - (1/20/14) Gerald Celente - Trends In The News - "America's Spiritual Death" - (1/20/14)

ZACKS | ZIM Weekly Update February 02, 2014: Get Ready for a Volatile 2014.

Get Ready for a Volatile 2014

by Mitch Zacks, Senior Portfolio Manager



If January is any indication, we should all prepare ourselves for large amount a stock volatility in 2014 and it may be more difficult than usual, given how little volatility we experienced in 2013. Volatility is what causes sleepless nights and that sinking feeling in your stomach. It is a terrible thing to go through, but completely normal and part of being an investor. Nobody ever said investing was a free ride and in 2014, I expect that ride to be a bumpy one due to the reasons listed below.

(Continued below...)


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Download Zacks' February 2014 Market Outlook

Download the latest Zacks Investment Management market commentary and learn where we believe the market is headed and why. This must-read report includes timely information regarding the stock market, the housing market, and the overall economy.

Click Here to Download 

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After the US economy grew at a blistering pace of 4.1% annualized in the third quarter of 2013, many were expecting a drop-off in the fourth quarter. However, the initial reading came in Thursday showing the economy grew at a very healthy clip of 3.2%. After all the talk of sluggish holiday sales and deep discounts not being enough to draw shoppers into stores, consumer spending rose at the fastest pace in three years. Household purchases rose at 3.3 percent rate, the best performance since 2010.

The increase was not constrained to one area of the economy. The rise in demand was broad-based as business investment accelerated, which was already showing signs of picking up as I mentioned in a previous column. Exports also grew, overcoming the damage done by the 16-day partial shutdown of federal agencies and budget cuts. Add this to the sequestration and tax hike we had at the beginning of the year and the US economy has shown itself to be remarkably resilient and healthy.

US stocks rebounded Thursday on the GDP news, completely erasing the losses of the week. However, at the time of this writing the S&P 500 is down 34 basis points to stand at 1,787. Despite some steep sell-offs recently, the S&P 500 is only down 3.3% on the year. Adding to the advance were several large companies beating earnings estimates. All 10 main sectors in the S&P 500 rose on the news of the economic growth.

Tapering Continues

On Wednesday, The Federal Reserve decided to cut its monthly asset-purchase program by another $10 billion to $65 billion ($35 billion of longer-term treasury securities and $30 billion of mortgage-backed securities).

In the statement issued after the two-day FOMC meeting, which was the last given by Ben Bernanke as Fed Chair, they said 的nformation received since the Federal Open Market Committee met in December indicates that growth in economic activity picked up in recent quarters."

Though most believed the Fed would continue its tapering plans of cutting $10 billion each meeting, a poor December jobs number and ongoing turmoil in the emerging markets led many to believe there may be a pause in the taper schedule. Stocks sold off approximately 1% after the announcement.

After the market close on Wednesday, 44 companies in the S&P 500 have reported profit above projections of analysts. Four companies trailed projections.

Could This Be the Second Shoe to Drop?

One of my concerns is there continues to be trouble in emerging markets. Emerging market currencies have been under pressure for some time, partly as a result of the effectiveness of the monetary stimulus of the US Federal Reserve. The monetary policy of the Fed has strengthened the U.S. economy and therefore reduced the relative attractiveness of emerging markets.

However, a survey out of China signaled the first time manufacturing there shrunk in six months. The HSBC survey backs up a preliminary version earlier this month that rattled markets by raising fears that the world痴 second largest economy is slowing. Whenever China hiccups the market tends to over react and in this case, HSBC痴 Purchasing Manager Index ( PMI ) for January came it at 49.6, down from a final reading of 50.5 the previous month. A number below 50 indicates contraction. While the reading was not good, it does not portend a global economic slowdown.

While the potential for a slowdown in emerging markets causing the earnings of U.S. multinationals to decline is real, the fear is likely overblown. At the end of the day, the market was looking for a reason to sell-off after its run-up. The emerging market problems are more of an excuse than anything else.

The news overseas in Europe was better with German unemployment declining more than originally forecast as continued growing confidence in Europe痴 largest economy kept growing. Like I have said in the past, while the peripheral countries in EU are slowly exiting their economic crises, Germany is the country that will be doing the heavy lifting in Europe.

In addition to Germany, England is showing signs of increasing health. Last year it was believed that England was in for a prolonged period of stagnant growth. The Bank of England finished Quantitative Easing and GDP had fallen six of the previous 16 quarters. 2013 was supposed be a lost year. Yet the preliminary estimate of Q4 UK GDP is showing the economy grew at 0.7% q/q in Q4, which would bring the full-year growth to 1.9% - the strongest since 2007 and the first time the UK has grown four straight quarters since the third quarter of 2010. There seems little doubt the UK is headed in the right direction.

Putting it All Together

As you can see the developed economies across the globe are growing at a healthy clip or at least starting to. However, continued problems in emerging markets will most likely continue to cause jitters in the markets. We are essentially seeing a role reversal where emerging markets were growing at a brisk pace, but are now having currency and credit problems of their own. As I have said before, this could cause the correction that is long overdue, but the global economic expansion continues to pick up steam. While I expect a much more volatile year than last year, I believe developed markets will lead the way to another strong year in equities.


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Find Out Which Asset Class is Poised to Lead

Download the latest Zacks Investment Research market commentary and forecasts of future asset class returns. Learn where we believe the market is headed and why. This must-read report includes timely information regarding the stock market, the housing market, and the overall economy.

Click Here to Download 

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About Mitch Zacks

Mitch is a Senior Portfolio Manager at Zacks Investment Management. He wrote a weekly column for the Chicago Sun-Times and has published two books on quantitative investment strategies. He has a B.A. in Economics from Yale University and an M.B.A. in Analytic Finance from the University of Chicago.


Mitch also is a Portfolio Manager for the Zacks Small Cap Core Fund ( ZSCCX ).

To contact us by mail:
Zacks Investment Management
Attn: Wealth Management Group
One South Wacker Drive, Suite 2700
Chicago, IL 60606

Past performance is no guarantee of future results. Inherent in any investment is the potential for loss.



    To contact us by mail:
    Zacks Investment Management
    Attn: Wealth Management Group
    One South Wacker Drive, Suite 2700
    Chicago, IL 60606
    Past performance is no guarantee of future results. Inherent in any investment is the potential for loss.
    Zacks Investment Management, Inc. is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Zacks Investment Research. Zacks Investment Management is an independent Registered Investment Advisory firm and acts an investment manager for individuals and institutions. Zacks Investment Research is a provider of earnings data and other financial data to institutions and to individuals.
    This communication is for informational purposes only and nothing herein should be construed as a solicitation, recommendation or an offer to buy or sell any securities or product, and does not constitute legal or tax advice. The information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable but we do not guarantee accuracy or completeness. Zacks Investment Management, Inc. is not engaged in rendering legal, tax, accounting or other professional services. Publication and distribution of this article is not intended to create, and the information contained herein does not constitute, an attorney- client relationship. Do not act or rely upon the information and advice given in this publication without seeking the services of competent and professional legal, tax, or accounting counsel.
    To unsubscribe from receiving "Zacks Weekly Update"
    e-mail newsletter, Click here....

    NYT | Today's Headlines February 02, 2014: Top News: Law Doesn't End Revolving Door on Capitol Hill.

    The New York TimesMost Popular | Video |

    Today's Headlines

    Sunday, February 2, 2014


    Top News
    Erik Olson was chief of staff to Representative Ron Kind, Democrat of Wisconsin until September. He soon became a lobbyist. Because his salary fell below a cap established in House rules, a one-year ban on lobbying his former boss does not apply.

    DEALBOOK

    Law Doesn't End Revolving Door on Capitol Hill

    By ERIC LIPTON and BEN PROTESS

    Former officials have little trouble passing through loopholes in laws intended to keep them from immediately lobbying their onetime colleagues.
    .
    Severe Drought Has U.S. West Fearing Worst

    By ADAM NAGOURNEY and IAN LOVETT

    The punishing drought that has swept California is now threatening the state's drinking water supply.
    Arriving at Mount Miaofeng, on what used to be a great pilgrimage route, a girl dressed to perform at the temple there took a break from the trek uphill.
    In China, 'Once the Villages Are Gone, the Culture Is Gone'

    By IAN JOHNSON

    As village life in China disappears and its traditions fade, some fight to maintain the country's rural cultural heritage.
    . Video  Video: Relocating Traditions in China
    For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »
    Editors' Picks

    SPORTS

    Video VIDEO: Super Bowl XLVIII, by the Numbers
    There is a lot you can learn about the Super Bowl in just over two minutes. Here are the most important figures to know about the big game.

    OPINION | OPINION

    Are You My Cousin?

    By A. J. JACOBS

    It's my admittedly quixotic dream that when we realize that we're all related, we'll treat one another with more civility.

    QUOTATION OF THE DAY

    "There is no second, no minute, where I can escape this tragedy. Not even 1 percent remains of the person I was."
    DODO KUMARITASHVILI, mother of the luge athlete Nodar Kumaritashvili, who was killed at the Winter Olympics in 2010.
    Today's Video

    T MAGAZINE

    True South | New Orleans Dining, High and Low

    By T MAGAZINE

    In the first episode of True South, a new video series, T's contributing editor Sara Ruffin Costello visits two buzzy just-opened restaurants, Killer Poboys and Marti's, that capture the essence of the modern-day New Orleans culinary scene.
    Video VIDEO: Vows: Finding Love, Again
    Anne Tarbell and William Marden III each lost their longtime spouses to cancer in 2010. Starting over again was frightening, but they adopted the mantra "life is for living."
    Video VIDEO: And Now, a Preview From Your Sponsor
    Advertising columnist Stuart Elliott discusses which Super Bowl commercials have already generated the most buzz.
    For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »
    ADVERTISEMENT
    World
    An antigovernment protester with his pistol on Saturday during a clash in Bangkok with supporters of the government.
    Gun Battle in Bangkok Escalates Election Protest

    By THOMAS FULLER

    At least six were injured in a battle between protesters seeking to block the distribution of ballots and would-be voters demanding that protesters stop trying to obstruct elections on Sunday.
    Emergency personnel combed through the rubble of the Résidence Du Havre last Wednesday, searching for human remains.
    Stunned by Tragedy, a Village in Rural Quebec Turns Inward

    By IAN AUSTEN

    After a fire swept through a retirement home in L'Isle-Verte, killing dozens, Quebec is experiencing a horrible sense of déjà vu: it has been only seven months since an oil train exploded into a fireball in Lac-Mégantic, killing 47.
    Petroswickonicovick Wandeckerkof da Silva Santos has also turned heads as a soccer prodigy.
    His Friends Know Him as Petroswickonicovick

    By SIMON ROMERO

    Carrying an extraordinary name is remarkably widespread in Brazil. Just ask Wonarllevyston Garlan Marllon Branddon Bruno Paullynelly Mell Oliveira Pereira.
    For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »
    U.S.
    Gov. Mark Dayton, center, at a forum last month in Duluth, Minn., where problems with the state insurance exchange was a topic.
    Glitches in State Exchanges Give G.O.P. a Cudgel

    By ABBY GOODNOUGH

    State-run health insurance exchanges are now the biggest laggards in fixing enrollment problems, and Republicans vow to make them an election issue.
    Edward J. Saylor, 93, reflected in the glass of a painting at home in Enumclaw, Wash. The work depicts his mission to bomb Japan just months after the attack on Pearl Harbor.
    Raiding Japan on Fumes in 1942, and Surviving to Tell How Fliers Did It

    By KIRK JOHNSON

    As a sergeant at 22, Edward J. Saylor was one of 80 Army Air Forces fliers on a mission to strike Japan after the attack on Pearl Harbor; at 93, he is one of four left.
    Landrieu Is Re-elected Mayor of New Orleans

    By CAMPBELL ROBERTSON

    Mr. Landrieu won 64 percent of the vote, which was partly seen as a referendum on the city's progress since Hurricane Katrina.
    For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »
    Politics
    Karl Rove, the founder of Crossroads, in 2012.
    Fund-Raising by G.O.P. Rebels Outpaces Party Establishment

    By NICHOLAS CONFESSORE

    Underscoring a potential shift of power in the Republican Party, candidates are counting on outside groups critical of the leadership for campaign muscle.
    F.C.C. Says It Will Double Spending on High-Speed Internet in Schools and Libraries

    By EDWARD WYATT

    Financing for an increase to $2 billion a year will come from restructuring the $2.4 billion E-Rate program.
    In Munich for a conference, Secretary of State John Kerry, second from right, met with Ukrainian opposition figures on Saturday.
    Kerry and Hagel Defend U.S. Engagement Abroad in Face of Criticism

    By STEVEN ERLANGER and THOM SHANKER

    Speaking at the Munich Security Conference, Secretary of State John Kerry expressed some exasperation with the criticism that the United States was retreating from a leadership role.
    For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »
    Business
    Olga Kay, a former juggler, uses her home in Encino, Calif., as a studio to make videos for her various channels on YouTube which attract about a million subscribers.
    Chasing Their Star, on YouTube

    By LESLIE KAUFMAN

    The message to aspiring video makers on YouTube is clear, and seductive: Attract an audience, build your brand. But success, let alone stardom and wealth, remains elusive.

    PREOCCUPATIONS

    Reopening an Employment Door to the Young

    By ROBERT W. GOLDFARB

    Many employers lament recent graduates' lack of specialized skills. But a management consultant says these young people still offer much potential for a company's future.

    FAIR GAME

    A Long Fight to Get What Was Theirs, in a 401(k)

    By GRETCHEN MORGENSON

    After a five-year battle, retirement account holders of a collapsed company can finally touch their money.
    For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »
    Technology

    STRATEGIES

    Trying to See Apple From a Different Angle

    By JEFF SOMMER

    Wall Street can't decide whether a giant company can still grow by leaps and bounds - or whether it even needs to.
    Jeff Lawson, the co-founder of Twilio, a cloud-based company that facilitates communications services.

    BITS BLOG

    When Your App Is in the Cloud

    By QUENTIN HARDY

    The telecommunications services business, worth $1 trillion in annual sales, is starting to feel the effects of cloud computing, one of this era's most important advances in high tech.
    AT&T said that a family of four can now get unlimited minutes and text, as well as 10GB of data, for $160 a month.

    BITS BLOG

    AT&T Sweetens Offer for Family Plans

    By BRIAN X. CHEN

    Responding to intense competition, AT&T, the second largest American phone carrier, on Saturday said it would offer a cheaper phone plan for families with multiple devices.
    For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »
    Sports
    Nodar Kumaritashvili's gravestone depicts him on a luge beneath the Olympic rings. Pigs and cattle walk over the grave, his family said.
    A Swift and Fatal Luge Plunge, and Then an Abyss of Sorrow

    By SAM BORDEN

    Nodar Kumaritashvili died at 21 in a luge crash on the eve of the 2010 Winter Olympics, a tragedy that stunned the sports world and that has left friends and family still seeking answers and action.
    . Video  Video: A Lethal Luge Accident Still Questioned
    The Sawtooth Club in Arco, Idaho, expects a crowd for the Super Bowl.
    At the Town in the Middle, Super Bowl Loyalties Are Difficult to Nail Down

    By CAMERON MORFIT

    The people of Arco, Idaho, halfway between Denver and Seattle, are picking sides, and there is no consensus.
    Defensive tackle Terrance Knighton of Denver, center, is a key to the Broncos' hopes of throttling Marshawn Lynch, whose punishing rushes might otherwise sustain long drives for the Seahawks.
    Denver's Offense (Unstoppable) vs. Seattle's Defense (Unmovable)

    By BEN SHPIGEL

    Seattle's hopes of containing the league's best offense hinge on its ability to mount long drives, and its N.F.L.-leading defense's success in hurrying Peyton Manning and jamming Bronco receivers.
    . Super Bowl XLVIII Matchup: Seahawks vs. Broncos
    . Photographs  Slide Show: A Supersize Celebration in Manhattan
    For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »
    Arts
    Loot No Longer

    By DOREEN CARVAJAL

    A reporter in France traces orphaned art, looted by the Nazis, to connect it to its rightful owners. A maze of information later, she has had some success.
    Ardelia Ripley Hall returning a portrait of St. Catherine by Rubens to Germany in 1952.
    Not All Monuments Men Were Men

    By TOM MASHBERG

    Dozens of women contributed to the recovery of looted art during World War II, though their stories aren't as well known as those of the Monuments Men.
    . History, Yes, but Movie History
    Dmitri Tcherniakov, in dark shirt, directing a video shoot for his staging of Borodin's