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Jan 19, 2014

Trade With Precision (TWP) This Week's Market Commentary Videos and Webinars January 19, 2014..

from Trade With Precision - www.tradewithprecision.com

Watch this week's market commentary videos where Nick McDonald provides a market outlook for the week ahead on the Russell 2000 and US Equity Markets along with the US Dollar Index.

Also remember to register for this week's webinars below:
The Top Ingredients For Successful Trading runs on:
Trading Strategy Precision Style runs on:

NYT | Asian Morning Today's Headlines January 20, 2014: Top News: Region Boiling, Israel Takes Up Castle Strategy.

The New York Times
NYT Apps|

Monday, January 20, 2014


Top News
An Israeli security coordinator near Kiryat Shmona stood by the remains of a rocket fired from Lebanon last month.
Region Boiling, Israel Takes Up Castle Strategy

By JODI RUDOREN

As Israel faces threats both from traditional Shiite adversaries like Iran and from extremist Sunni cells in Syria, Iraq and beyond, officials insist they have no inclination to intervene.
Iran Welcomes Start of Nuclear Deal

By THOMAS ERDBRINK

Iranian leaders said they were encouraged not only by the prospect of economic relief with the lifting of some sanctions, but also by a possible end to the country's political isolation.
A girl pushed a cart past burning houses in the Central African Republic town of Bossangoa earlier this month. Dozens of villages and parts of towns have been burned down by marauding guerrillas in a fitful sectarian civil war between Christians and Muslims.
Ghost Town Is Mute Witness to Central African Violence

By ADAM NOSSITER

The buildings in Bossangoa are charred and abandoned, with most of the population of 50,000 now in refugee camps, one for Muslims and another for Christians.
For more top news, go to INYT.com
Top News
A man cleaned a damaged car that had been parked near the restaurant that was attacked Friday.
Deadly Attack at Kabul Restaurant Hints at Changing Climate for Foreigners

By AZAM AHMED and MATTHEW ROSENBERG

Kabul during the Afghan war was never violent as Baghdad during the Iraq war. But as coalition forces leave, international workers here feel more vulnerable.
. Video  Video: The Scene After a Bombing in Kabul
Syrian Opposition Votes to Attend Peace Talks

By SEBNEM ARSU and BEN HUBBARD

The vote was boycotted by a third of the members of the main rebel coalition, a reflection of the intense divisions among those seeking to overthrow President Bashar al-Assad.
President Obama speaking about surveillance programs on Friday at the Justice Department.

NEWS ANALYSIS

With Plan to Overhaul Spying, the Divisiveness Is in the Details

By PETER BAKER and JEREMY W. PETERS

Now that President Obama has announced an overhaul of surveillance practices, the real work begins for intelligence agencies and a divided Congress to create new policies.
For more top news, go to INYT.com
Editors' Picks

OPINION | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

Sometimes 'Nazi' Is the Right Word

By ETGAR KERET

If Israel bans the word "Nazi," "Seinfeld" will be verboten, too.

MAGAZINE

Video VIDEO: The Scramble: A Simple Greek Lunch
Mark Bittman and the Greek chef Diane Kochilas make strapatsada, an easy shredded-tomato-and-egg scramble.
World
South Sudan Recaptures Town From Rebels

By NICHOLAS KULISH

The government said it had won a significant military victory by seizing the city of Bor in Jonglei State.
Hundreds of people gathered in Mumbai to pay their respects to Syedna Mohammed Burhanuddin, who was the leader of the Dawoodi Bohra community.
A Stampede of Mourners in India Kills at Least 18

By MANSI CHOKSI and GARDINER HARRIS

Hundreds were packed into narrow lanes trying to get a glimpse of the body of the spiritual leader Syedna Mohammad Burhanuddin when the stampede occurred.
Sanctions Eased, Iran Gets Feelers From Old Trading Partners

By THOMAS ERDBRINK

Excitement over the interim agreement, which will ease some provisions of the American-led sanctions on Iran but essentially leave all of them in place, has not extended to American companies.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World
Business
Chet Kanojia, chief executive of Aereo, at the company's Manhattan office.
Planting an Antenna on Network TV's Turf

By LESLIE KAUFMAN

Chet Kanojia's company, Aereo, has figured out how to grab over-the-air television signals and stream them to subscribers on the Internet. It is an invention that could topple TV titans.
Fake ID cards that the government says were ordered by Ross Ulbricht. The government says they were found in a package addressed to the group house where he lived in San Francisco and were intercepted by Customs and Border Protection. The United States attorney's office redacted some information on the IDs.
Eagle Scout. Idealist. Drug Trafficker?

By DAVID SEGAL

Friends call Ross Ulbricht sensitive and soulful. Prosecutors contend that he ran a global, illicit online bazaar.
Marissa Mayer, chief of Yahoo, at the International CES in Las Vegas.

NEWS ANALYSIS

Yahoo's Asian Lifeline

By JEFF SOMMER

Despite the company's recent shake-up, Wall Street still likes its valuable holdings in China and Japan.
For more business news, go to INYT.com/Business
Technology
Disruptions: Looking for Relief From a Flood of Email

BITS BLOG

Disruptions: Looking for Relief From a Flood of Email

By NICK BILTON

Email is probably one of the most invasive forms of communication yet devised. For those who can't seem to handle the onslaught, there is always the extreme option: select all, hit delete and declare email bankruptcy.
Shoppers at a Target store during a sale on Thanksgiving Day. Data from as many as 110 million customers is believed to have been stolen.
A Sneaky Path Into Target Customers' Wallets

By ELIZABETH A. HARRIS, NICOLE PERLROTH, NATHANIEL POPPER and HILARY STOUT

An examination by The New York Times into an enormous data theft shows that Target's system was particularly vulnerable to attack.
President Obama delivered remarks about government surveillance programs at the Department of Justice in Washington on Friday.
Obama Outlines Calibrated Curbs on Phone Spying

By MARK LANDLER and CHARLIE SAVAGE

In a speech that seemed more calculated to reassure audiences at home and abroad than to force radical change, President Obama announced significant changes to the way the government collects and uses telephone records.
. Documents  Presidential Policy Directive | Text of the Speech
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Tech
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Sports
Grigor Dimitrov defeated Milos Raonic on Saturday.
Still Waiting for New Royalty in Men's Game

By GREG BISHOP

The same four players have had a hold on men's tennis for the better part of nine seasons, but Grigor Dimitrov and Milos Raonic could be capable of breaking through.

ROUNDUP

Arsenal and Manchester City Don't Miss a Beat

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Arsenal and Manchester City continued their winning ways Saturday in England's Premier League.
Canada won the gold medal in 2010 on Sidney Crosby's overtime goal against the United States.
Crosby at Top of His Game on the Way to Sochi

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sidney Crosby is the unquestioned face of the Canadian team as it looks to defend its Olympic gold medal next month.
For more sports news, go to INYT.com/Sports
U.S. News
Rules for Equal Coverage by Employers Remain Elusive Under Health Law

By ROBERT PEAR

The administration is delaying enforcement of the health law provision that prohibits employers from providing better benefits to top executives than to other employees.
Greg Whiteley, who directed
Film Gives a Peek at the Romney Who Never Quite Won Over Voters

By ASHLEY PARKER

A film offers a behind-the-scenes look at Mitt Romney and his quest for the presidency.
At Folsom Lake in California, which is at 17 percent of capacity, the marina sits on dry land and an abandoned town from the 19th century has resurfaced.
Severe Drought Grows Worse in California

By NORIMITSU ONISHI and MALIA WOLLAN

The problem is visible from the Sierra Nevada to the farmlands in the southern part of the state, and it threatens to cause major hardship.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US
Opinion

OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

Workers of the World, Faint!

By JULIA WALLACE

In history, magical events have been reported when indigenous peoples confront industrial capitalism.

EDITORIAL

A Step Toward Restoring Voting Rights

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

Though flawed, a bipartisan bill would begin to undo the Supreme Court's damage.
Frank Bruni

OP-ED COLUMNIST

The Cruelest Pregnancy

By FRANK BRUNI

A Texas law has turned a brain-dead woman into an incubator. How does that honor life?
. Columnist Page | Blog

In German newspaper, Bundesbank makes lame excuses for slow repatriation of gold: GATA | THE GATA DISPATCH January 19, 2014.



In German newspaper, Bundesbank makes lame excuses for slow repatriation of gold


Submitted by cpowell on 11:43AM ET Sunday, January 19, 2014. Section: Daily Dispatches
11:44a PT Sunday, January 19, 2014

The German newspaper The World on Sunday today provides the Bundesbank's excuses for being so slow to repatriate the gold it supposedly has vaulted at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York --
-- and Zero Hedge promptly tears those excuses to shreds, noting that the current repatriation episode would not be the first time the U.S. government has sought to deceive Germany about its gold:
What is most notable here is that the gold issue has begun seriously troubling the German political establishment and is breaking into the mainstream financial news media, thanks to the determined clamor of gold's friends in Germany. Maybe someday soon the issue will break into the mainstream financial news media in other Western countries.
CHRIS POWELL, Secretary/Treasurer
Gold Anti-Trust Action Committee Inc.

BNN allows a warning about Comex's paper gold: GATA | THE GATA DISPATCH January 19, 2014: BNN allows a warning about Comex's paper gold.

BNN allows a warning about Comex's paper gold

Submitted by cpowell on 11:40PM ET Saturday, January 18, 2014. Section: Daily Dispatches
11:39p PT Saturday, January 18, 2014
Dear Friend of GATA and Gold:
Canada's Business News Network on Friday permitted Tres Knippa of Kenai Capital Management in Chicago to warn about the likely inability of the New York Commodities Exchange to deliver anything but a tiny fraction of the gold supposedly behind the pending contracts sold there, as well as about Germany's seeming inability to recover its gold from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. The segment is seven minutes long and can be seen at the BNN archive here:
CHRIS POWELL, Secretary/Treasurer
Gold Anti-Trust Action Committee Inc.

NYT | Today's Headlines January 19, 2013: Top News: PAYING TILL IT HURTS Patients' Costs Skyrocket; Specialists' Incomes Soar.

The New York TimesMost Popular | Video |

Today's Headlines

Sunday, January 19, 2014


Top News
Dr. Brett Coldiron removes suspected cancerous skin cells from a patient during Mohs surgery at The Skin Cancer Center in Cincinnati, Ohio.

PAYING TILL IT HURTS

Patients' Costs Skyrocket; Specialists' Incomes Soar

By ELISABETH ROSENTHAL

Patient costs are rising because medical procedures often involve several doctors from specialties that are among the highest compensated, and are done on the grounds of a hospital.
Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey, with his wife, Mary Pat, was in Florida on Saturday for a fund-raising trip.
G.O.P. Advice for Christie: Pick a Better Team

By MICHAEL BARBARO, JONATHAN MARTIN and NICHOLAS CONFESSORE

Republicans around the country are offering pointed advice, sobering in its candor, for Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey, after his top aides were linked to the Fort Lee scandal.
. Mayor Says Hurricane Relief Was Threatened
An Israeli security coordinator near Kiryat Shmona stood by the remains of a rocket fired from Lebanon last month.
Region Boiling, Israel Takes Up Castle Strategy

By JODI RUDOREN

As Israel faces threats both from traditional Shiite adversaries like Iran and from extremist Sunni cells in Syria, Iraq and beyond, officials have embraced a castle mentality.
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »
Editors' Picks

THEATER

Video VIDEO: To Sit and Sing: A Musical Tradition
A behind-the-scenes look at the sitzprobe for the musical "The Bridges of Madison County." This theater tradition is the first time a show's cast and full orchestra practice face-to-face.
. Related Article

OPINION | OPINION

For the Love of Money

By SAM POLK

We are letting money addiction drive too much of our society.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY

"It may be better to wait and see, but waiting doesn't make you money. It's 'Let me do a little snip of tissue' and then they get professional, lab and facility fees. Each patient is like an ATM machine."
JEAN MITCHELL, a professor of health economics at Georgetown University, on procedures in American health care.
Today's Video
Video VIDEO: The Surprise Wedding
When guests arrived at what they were told was Rebecca Garcia and Andrew Spiegel's engagement party, they found the space decorated for a wedding.
Video VIDEO: Bill Cunningham | Check Mates
The silhouette is familiar, but the mix of three fabrics and patterns on one coat is a winter highlight.
Video VIDEO: The Source | Paolo Soleri
Doug Aitken interviews the architect Paolo Soleri.
For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »
ADVERTISEMENT
World
A man cleaned a damaged car that had been parked near the restaurant that was attacked Friday.
Deadly Attack at Kabul Restaurant Hints at Changing Climate for Foreigners

By AZAM AHMED and MATTHEW ROSENBERG

Kabul during the Afghan war was never violent as Baghdad during the Iraq war. But as coalition forces leave, international workers here feel more vulnerable.
. Video  Video: The Scene After a Bombing in Kabul
Syrian Opposition Votes to Attend Peace Talks

By SEBNEM ARSU and BEN HUBBARD

The vote was boycotted by a third of the members of the main rebel coalition, a reflection of the intense divisions among those seeking to overthrow President Bashar al-Assad.
MORE FEET ON THE GROUND  A Cossack officer is among hundreds who are joining regular security forces at Olympic venues like Rosa Khutor, a skiing center.
Determined to Miss Nothing, Russia Trains All Eyes on Sochi

By STEVEN LEE MYERS

As the Winter Games approach, tens of thousands of personnel and surveillance cameras have been deployed to Sochi. Critics say the measures threaten to temper the Olympic spirit.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »
U.S.
Senator Joe Manchin III, center, has long been wary of environmental regulations.
Chemical Spill Muddies Picture in a State Wary of Regulations

By TRIP GABRIEL, MICHAEL WINES and CORAL DAVENPORT

West Virginia, with its strong ties to coal and chemicals, has long had a fierce opposition to environmental regulations.
After Years at War, the Army Adapts to Garrison Life

By THOM SHANKER

The Army sent 1.3 million troops to war after 9/11, creating the most combat-tested force in the nation's history, but now it must learn how to sustain morale and capabilities.
President Obama speaking about surveillance programs on Friday at the Justice Department.

NEWS ANALYSIS

With Plan to Overhaul Spying, the Divisiveness Is in the Details

By PETER BAKER and JEREMY W. PETERS

Now that President Obama has announced an overhaul of surveillance practices, the real work begins for intelligence agencies and a divided Congress to create new policies.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »
Politics
Rules for Equal Coverage by Employers Remain Elusive Under Health Law

By ROBERT PEAR

The administration is delaying enforcement of the health law provision that prohibits employers from providing better benefits to top executives than to other employees.
Greg Whiteley, who directed
Film Gives a Peek at the Romney Who Never Quite Won Over Voters

By ASHLEY PARKER

A film offers a behind-the-scenes look at Mitt Romney and his quest for the presidency.
An Interview With Mitt Romney

By ASHLEY PARKER

The former presidential candidate gives his thoughts on another run ("No, no, no") and on the future for him and his party.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »
Business
Ross Ulbricht is accused of being the mastermind of Silk Road, the world's largest and most notorious black market for drugs.
Eagle Scout. Idealist. Drug Trafficker?

By DAVID SEGAL

Friends call Ross Ulbricht sensitive and soulful. Prosecutors contend that he ran a global, illicit online bazaar.

FAIR GAME

Inspecting a Student Loan Spigot

By GRETCHEN MORGENSON

ITT Educational Services, which operates for-profit technical schools, has drawn the attention of regulators over a private lending trust.
The beers are sold at the brewery in bottles and 2-liter growlers.

PROTOTYPE

Craft Beer, the (Very) Limited Edition

By CLAIRE MARTIN

You can't buy his pale ales, porters and stouts anywhere outside Vermont. And that suits the brewer just fine.
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »
Technology
Marissa Mayer, chief of Yahoo, at the International CES in Las Vegas.

NEWS ANALYSIS

Yahoo's Asian Lifeline

By JEFF SOMMER

Despite the company's recent shake-up, Wall Street still likes its valuable holdings in China and Japan.
Technology Is Not Driving Us Apart After All

By MARK OPPENHEIMER

It turns out, we may be more social than we were 30 years ago - at least in public spaces.

INNOVATION

Who Made That Captcha?

By DANIEL ENGBER

A Turing test in reverse.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »
Sports
Rivalry Between Seattle and San Francisco Heats Up the West Coast

By JOHN BRANCH

The N.F.C. championship game between Seattle and San Francisco is the latest event in a long-running debate over football and cultural superiority in the West Coast cities.
Caleb Moore on Jan. 24, 2013, practicing for the snowmobile freestyle at the Winter X Games in Aspen, Colo.
Dizzying Heights, With Risks

By JOE DRAPE

The X Games drive revenue while showcasing sports like motocross and freestyle snowmobiling, but last year came a first: a death in competition, of Caleb Moore.
. Photographs  Slide Show: Defying Gravity
Serena Williams, who had won 77 of her last 80 matches, lost to Ana Ivanovic on Sunday.
Serena Williams Tumbles in Australian Open's Fourth Round

By GREG BISHOP

In the biggest upset so far at the tournament, Ana Ivanovic defeated Serena Williams for the first time as Williams suffered from back pain and a flurry of errors.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »
Arts
The architects Ricardo Scofidio and Liz Diller, left, urged razing the American Folk Art Museum building, which was designed by another architect duo, their longtime friends Billie Tsien and Tod Williams, right.
Building Faces Wrecking Ball. So Does Couples' Friendship.

By ROBIN POGREBIN

Since the architects Ricardo Scofidio and Elizabeth Diller recommended razing the site of the former American Folk Art Museum, designed by another well-known pair, the friendship of the four has come under stress.
Portrait of Ellen DeGeneres taken at Warner Bros. Studios.
Easy, Breezy, Trending

By BROOKS BARNES

On the eve of hosting the Academy Awards ceremony, Ellen DeGeneres takes a reporter behind the scenes on her talk show.
Lost in the Gallery-Industrial Complex

By HOLLAND COTTER

Most every aspect of the art world has been affected by high-priced galleries and collectors with deep pockets.
For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »