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Dec 9, 2013

The Economist | New Selected Articles December 09, 2013: Nelson Mandela, Doha and the United States of Amoeba




A selection of new stories from Economist.com
Nelson Mandela
Doha delivers
The empires strike back
Fighting the low notes
A quarrelsome, thoughtful family
Nelson Mandela
His greatness challenges us all
READ MORE »
Free exchange
Doha delivers
WTO members conclude an historic trade agreement on the island of Bali
READ MORE »
Schumpeter
The empires strike back
America's tech giants have a chance to show off their lobbying magic
READ MORE »
Fighting the low notes
Spotify hopes musicians will start spending their time boosting, and not blasting, the music-streaming service
READ MORE »
Erasmus
A quarrelsome, thoughtful family
A common patriarch won't necessarily reconcile Jews, Christians, Muslims; a common intellectual tradition might
READ MORE »

Latest Multimedia
Video
United States of Amoeba
How American politics has pulled apart
WATCH »

Bloomberg Share The View December 09, 2013: Volcker Rule Realized

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SHARE THE VIEW
A quick look at Bloomberg News's opinion section

December 9, 2013For more, visit www.bloomberg.com/view»
VOLCKER RULE: "When Paul Volcker first proposed a ban on proprietary trading by banks in 2009, the financial and regulatory Establishment thought he'd gone, well, crazy," the Editors write. "Four years later, despite these objections and a formidable campaign of opposition, Volcker's idea is about to become reality." Read more 

TOO BIG TO FAIL: Treasury Secretary Jack Lew "is arguing that we are on the verge of making it possible for large complex financial institutions -- really the six biggest U.S. banks -- to fail," Simon Johnson writes. "It is very difficult to find anyone in the private sector -- in finance or elsewhere -- who shares Lew's view." Read more  

RACISM: "Racism is no longer at the center of American culture. But it persists," Francis Wilkinson writes. "And as long as it does, it demeans and diminishes. The death of Nelson Mandela reminds us that Ronald Reagan, William Buckley and other conservative heroes were on the wrong side of history on racial politics in South Africa."Read more 

NELSON MANDELA: Stanley B. Greenberg: "I spent two decades working to defeat apartheid -- the greatest injustice of our time -- and strengthen the ANC. I understood the symbolic power of Mandela's rise. What I hadn't bargained on was Mandela the politician -- a leader deeply engaged in campaign strategy and tactics in the first truly democratic election in South Africa." Read more
ASIA: "Joe Biden's trip to northeast Asia has left some in Japan feeling abandoned," the Editors write. "By not demanding that China roll back its new 'air-defense identification zone,' the U.S. vice president tacitly accepted the controversial zone as a fait accompli. Yet a tougher stance would have led nowhere." Read more 

JOHN KERRY: In less than a year as secretary of state, John Kerry "has rolled up more tangible accomplishments than his celebrated and cautious predecessor, Hillary Clinton, did in four," Albert R. Huntwrites. "It remains an open question whether the White House will try to rein him in." Read more 

GLOBAL GROWTH: "Current pessimism about the world economy is overdone," Jim O'Neill writes. "The world's three biggest economies -- the U.S., China and Japan -- are all in decent shape." Read more 

GATA | THE GATA DISPATCH December 09, 2013: Quebec tax agency hikes charges against Kitco; company rebuts them in detail



Quebec tax agency hikes charges against Kitco; company rebuts them in detail


Kitco Metals Among Gold Traders Facing Quebec Tax Fraud Allegations
By Nicolas Van Praet
National Post, Toronto
Monday, December 9, 2013
MONTREAL -- Revenu-Quebec is seeking prison sentences and fines totalling $750 million for Kitco Metals Inc. founder Bart Kitner and directors with several other gold trading firms following one of the biggest tax fraud investigations in provincial history.
Quebec's revenue department on Monday said it filed a total of 1,920 charges against Kitco and 11 other companies as well as their directors and an accountant implicated in an alleged fraud scheme linked to gold processing. Some 120 charges were filed against Kitco and another 120 against Mr. Kitner involving total fines of $454.6 million.
"This is an investigation that's lasted several years and the evidence is significant," said Revenu-Quebec spokesman Stephane Dion. "It's one of the largest investigations we've ever done."

NYT | Asian Morning December 09, 2013.

The New York Times
NYT Apps|Subscribe: Digital / Home Delivery

Tuesday, December 10, 2013



Top News
Ukraine Raids Party's Office and Encircles Protesters

By DAVID M. HERSZENHORN

Ominous new action by Ukraine's security forces on Monday appeared to scuttle an opening for talks between the government and demonstrators.
Spies' Dragnet Reaches a Playing Field of Elves and Trolls

By MARK MAZZETTI and JUSTIN ELLIOTT

American and British spies have infiltrated online fantasy games, fearing that militants could use them to communicate, move money or plot attacks, documents show.
. Video: World of Spycraft | Infiltrating a Virtual Realm
With No Notice, Putin Scraps Kremlin News Agencies

By STEVEN LEE MYERS

The decision to dissolve Ria Novosti, along with its international radio broadcaster, came as a complete surprise and signaled a major state media reorganization in Russia.
For more top news, go to INYT.com
Editors' Picks

U.S.

Video VIDEO: Exxon Valdez: In the Wake of Disaster
In 1989, a tanker ran aground off the coast of Alaska, causing one of the worst oil spills in United States history. Nearly 25 years later, the lessons of the Exxon Valdez continue to resonate.
Roger Cohen

OPINION | OP-ED COLUMNIST

The Beast in India's Midst

By ROGER COHEN

A prominent feminist journalist is hounded in the most talked-about rape case in India.
. Columnist Page
World

THE LEDE

Ukraine on Edge as Protesters and the Authorities Face Off

By CHRISTINE HAUSER

Battalions of police officers confronted demonstrators in Kiev, a day after a huge rally in which a statue of Lenin was toppled in Independence Square.
Jang Song Thaek, uncle to North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, was forcibly removed from a meeting of the Political Bureau by uniformed personnel in a photograph released Monday by Yonhap news agency.

NEWS ANALYSIS

A Gamble for North Korea's Young Leader

By CHOE SANG-HUN

In publicly dismissing his uncle and mentor, Kim Jong-un removed a potential challenger to his power.
. North Korea Releases List of Accusations Against Purged Official
Kim Min-seok, a spokesman for the South Korean Defense Ministry, at a news conference on Sunday.
South Korea Announces Expansion of Its Air Defense Zone

By CHOE SANG-HUN

The move creates a military air patrol region that overlaps with zones declared by Japan and China at a time of heightened tensions over disputed territory in the region.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World
Business
Workers protested against expected job cuts outside the EADS manufacturing plant in Bremen, Germany, last month.
EADS to Cut 5,800 Jobs as Military Budgets Shrink

By NICOLA CLARK

The reduction, representing about 5 percent of the work force, is part of the group's efforts to focus on Airbus, its commercial airplane business, and pare its military unit.
Industrial Production Slows in Germany

By DAVID JOLLY

The decline in October for a second straight month was the latest sign that the engine of the euro zone recovery might not be growing as well as had been expected.
The Federal Reserve chairman, Ben S. Bernanke. The Fed's final 2013 meeting is next week.
Fed's Plan to Taper Stimulus Effort Is Not Expected Until Next Year

By BINYAMIN APPELBAUM

Significant details of the eventual retreat also remain the subjects of unresolved debates, according to public statements by Fed officials and interviews with some of them.
For more business news, go to INYT.com/Business
Technology
Servers in a Google data center in Oregon. The company is tightening its networks against government spying.
Tech Giants Issue Call for Limits on Government Surveillance of Users

By EDWARD WYATT and CLAIRE CAIN MILLER

Eight major companies, led by Google and Microsoft, are calling for tighter controls on surveillance of their customers' data by governments worldwide.
. A Senator Plans Legislation to Narrow Authorities' Cellphone Data Requests
Carriers delivered 9,000 so-called tower dumps of all data from a cell tower last year.
A Senator Plans Legislation to Narrow Authorities' Cellphone Data Requests

By BRIAN X. CHEN

The carriers are shown to turn over records thousands of times a day in response to police emergencies, subpoenas and other requests.
Xiaomi Plans to Expand Into Southeast Asia

BITS BLOG

Xiaomi Plans to Expand Into Southeast Asia

By ERIC PFANNER

The Chinese smartphone maker has generated considerable attention because of the company's marketing savvy.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Tech
ADVERTISEMENT
Sports
Spain Coach Vicente del Bosque said last Friday's draw might not be the last time he holds the World Cup trophy.
For Del Bosque and Spain, Another Championship Phase Begins

By ROB HUGHES

Vicente del Bosque will have a team for the World Cup that he says is in "one of its best-ever phases."
Nelson Mandela sported team attire during a 1990 concert and rally at Yankee Stadium, with Mayor David Dinkins, left.
Mandela, Self-Declared Yankee, Gets Plaque in Monument Park

By DAVID WALDSTEIN

The Yankees said they would commemorate Nelson Mandela's triumphant visit to Yankee Stadium in 1990.
Ted Ligety won a World Cup giant slalom in 2:35.77, with Bode Miller 1.32 seconds back.
Ligety Dominates and Miller Surprises in 1-2 U.S. Finish

By KELLEY McMILLAN

Ted Ligety and Bode Miller of the United States took gold and silver in the giant slalom race in Beaver Creek, Colo., the first time since 2005 that two American men have gone one-two in a giant slalom.
For more sports news, go to INYT.com/Sports
U.S. News
Clockwise from top left: Tasha Huebner, Ray Acosta, Bruce Kleinschmidt, and Claire He.
Amid the Uproar Over the Health Law, Voices of Quiet Optimism and Relief

By ABBY GOODNOUGH, KATIE THOMAS and REED ABELSON

Despite its flaws, the insurance market has given hope to many who could not afford coverage or were denied it because of existing medical conditions.
Kathleen Sebelius, seated left, and other officials have said insurance is now more affordable.
On Health Exchanges, Premiums May Be Low, but Other Costs Can Be High

By ROBERT PEAR

Deductibles and other out-of-pocket costs on plans bought through the government are much higher than the typical employer-sponsored policy.
The core values of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department are displayed at the Men's Central Jail in downtown Los Angeles.
18 Charged in Inquiry Into Los Angeles Sheriff's Office

By JENNIFER MEDINA

The 18 were accused of excessive use of force and obstruction of justice as part of a sprawling, yearslong investigation into allegations of misconduct and abuse of inmates in county jails.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US
Opinion

OPINION

Rushing for the Arctic's Riches

By MICHAEL T. KLARE

Arctic states have asserted exclusive drilling rights, but the region is not likely to surrender its resources easily.

OPINION

Shameful Profiling of the Mentally Ill

By ANDREW SOLOMON

America turned back a Canadian who was traveling for a vacation cruise because she had been hospitalized for depression the previous year.
For more opinion, go to INYT.com/Opinion

NYT | ALERT FGC BOLSA - FGC FINANCIAL MARKETS December 09, 2013: Economix A Fed Dissident on Policy and Transparency

The New York Times | MY ALERTS

FGC BOLSA- FGC FIN

Compiled: December 9, 2013 06:07:28 PM

Economix

A Fed Dissident on Policy and Transparency
Charles I. Plosser, head of the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, who has opposed the Fed’s stimulus efforts, explains how he thinks the bond-buying effort should be wound down.