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Oct 26, 2013

NYT | Today's Headlines October 26, 2013: Promised Fix for Health Site Could Squeeze Some Users

The New York Times

Today's Headlines

Saturday, October 26, 2013 


Top News
Jeffrey D. Zients is President Obama's troubleshooter for correcting problems at the federal health care Web site.
Promised Fix for Health Site Could Squeeze Some Users

By ROBERT PEAR and SHARON LaFRANIERE

The White House said that it would fix the insurance marketplace by Nov. 30, raising the question of how people whose current policies do not comply with the law will get new coverage in time.
. In White House Pitches, Rosy View of Health Care Site
. Graphic Problems That Have Crippled HealthCare.gov
Martha Gualotuna from Ecuador protested in front of Speaker John A. Boehner's office on Wednesday.
Immigration Poses Threat of Another Republican Rift

By ERIC LIPTON and ASHLEY PARKER

A push to bring legislation to the House floor, led by a coalition of executives, conservatives and evangelical leaders, could affect campaign contributions before the midterm elections.
. Graphic Graphic: Progress on an Immigration Overhaul in 5 Areas
Saudi Arabia, frustrated with the United States on Syria, wants to offer more arms to the rebels, but is concerned that the weapons might get into the wrong hands.
Angry Over Syrian War, Saudis Fault U.S. Policy

By BEN HUBBARD and ROBERT F. WORTH

Saudi Arabia is threatening to break with the United States and pursue a more robust role in supporting the rebellion against the Syrian government. But officials worry about alienating a friend and helping jihadists. 


Editors' Picks

ARTS | Special Section

Fine Arts & Exhibits
Never mind the record auction prices for art: there are overlooked pockets of the art world still within the realm of affordability to collectors. With news about galleries, museum exhibitions, previews and more.
. Fine Arts & Exhibits: Prices That Fly Under the Headlines
. Fine Arts & Exhibits: Galleries as the Art World's Leading Indicators
. Go to Section
Dropping a Name (Or, Goodbye, John Wesley Harding)

OPINION | Opinionator | Measure for Measure

Dropping a Name (Or, Goodbye, John Wesley Harding)

By WESLEY STACE

After 25 years of performing with a stage name, I've finally reclaimed my own, and it's all a great relief.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY

"One of these days in the near future, when I start to cry or I laugh, you're going to be able to tell by looking at me how I feel."
CARMEN TARTLETON, who underwent a face transplant after being attacked with industrial lye.
ADVERTISEMENT
World
Children carried their belongings in Homs, Syria, this month. The United Nations is struggling with how to deliver emergency aid as the war rages.
U.N., Fearing a Polio Epidemic in Syria, Moves to Vaccinate Millions of Children

By RICK GLADSTONE

Officials said that the discovery a few weeks ago of a cluster of paralyzed young children in Deir al-Zour, a heavily contested city in eastern Syria, had prompted their alarm.
. Hardships Mounting for Refugees Inside Syria
. Norway Rejects U.S. Request to Help Destroy Syrian Chemical Weapons
Sasha Ruseva, holding her son, 2, outside her home, left, in Nikolaevo, Bulgaria. Ms. Ruseva and her husband had been questioned in the hunt for the parents of a girl found in Greece.
Roma, Feared as Kidnappers, See Their Own Children at Risk

By DAN BILEFSKY

A backlash against members of the ethnic group has fed negative stereotypes, but many say it is they who must worry about losing their children.

News Analysis

In Spy Uproar, 'Everyone Does It' Just Won't Do

By DAVID E. SANGER

The uproar in Europe has obscured a new reality: The digital age has merely expanded the ability of nations to do to one another what they have done for centuries.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »
U.S.
Six years ago, Carmen Tarleton was beaten with a bat and burned beyond recognition with industrial lye in an attack by her estranged husband. She has undergone almost 60 operations, mostly skin grafts.
For Victim of Ghastly Crime, a New Face, a New Beginning

By ABBY GOODNOUGH

Six years after being beaten and burned beyond recognition, Carmen Tarleton is adjusting to a transplanted face.
Gov. Rick Snyder of Michigan is to consider a bill to withhold unemployment benefits.
Drug Tests Falter as Way for States to Deny Public Aid

By STEVEN YACCINO

Proposals to refuse welfare and jobless aid based on failed tests have proved hard to enact and have had a limited effect.
Rules would require producers of food for farm animals and pets to take steps to prevent illness.
F.D.A. Bids to Regulate Animal Food, Acting After Recall and Deaths

By SABRINA TAVERNISE

The Food and Drug Administration, hoping to prevent food-borne illness, proposed rules for pet food and farm animal feed. 

Politics
Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany arriving Friday to meet with European leaders in Brussels. She has expressed concern over American spying.
Amid New Storm in U.S.-Europe Relationship, a Call for Talks on Spying

By ALISON SMALE

The offer was an attempt to defuse a trans-Atlantic dispute over eavesdropping by the United States that has hurt its relations with Europe and prompted calls to suspend trade talks.
. Indignation Over U.S. Spying Spreads in Europe
President Obama exited Marine One in Prospect Park in Brooklyn before heading to Pathways in Technology Early College High School.
Obama, at Brooklyn School, Pushes Education Agenda

By AL BAKER

The president went to the Pathways in Technology Early College High School, which he mentioned in his State of the Union address this year, to talk about education.
Senator Ted Cruz of Texas, second from right, made no direct mention of running for president.
Cruz Takes His Stand on the Road to Iowa

By JONATHAN MARTIN

Senator Ted Cruz, the Texas Republican, argued that the battle over the health care law would invigorate Republicans in next year's elections.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »
Business
A federal jury in Manhattan found Bank of America's Countrywide mortgage unit liable for having sold defective mortgages.

DealBook

Midlevel Bank Executive Is a New Face of the Housing Crisis

By LANDON THOMAS JR.

Rebecca S. Mairone, a midlevel executive at Bank of America's Countrywide mortgage unit, seems the most unlikely of culprits to emerge from the housing debacle.
By the end of this decade, if not sooner, sales of bottled water are expected to surpass those of carbonated soft drinks.
Bottled Water Sales Rising as Soda Ebbs

By STEPHANIE STROM

By the end of the decade, sales of water - whether plain, flavored or carbonated - will surpass those of sodas like Coke and Pepsi.
JPMorgan Chase's headquarters in New York.

DealBook

JPMorgan Reaches Deal With Agency Over Loans

By BEN PROTESS and PETER EAVIS

The Federal Housing Finance Agency, which helped forge a tentative $13 billion settlement with JPMorgan Chase, split off with its own deal, extracting a $4 billion payout from the nation's biggest bank.
. Graphic  Graphic: Tracking the JPMorgan Investigations
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »
Technology
Peter Stern cashed in on Facebook, but said

Wealth Matters

Twitter Tantalizes, but Beware the I.P.O.

By PAUL SULLIVAN

Some offerings get so much attention they can cloud people's judgment, but investors must understand how a company's stock will fit in their portfolio.
Dick Costolo, right, the chief of Twitter, outside Morgan Stanley's headquarters in New York on Friday.

DealBook

Twitter Visits Wall St. to Preview I.P.O. Roadshow

By DAVID GELLES

Twitter's roadshow may not begin until Monday, but its executives are already making the rounds in New York.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »
Sports
Practice resumed at Grambling after a boycott.
At Grambling, a Proud Football Program at Risk

By GREG BISHOP

Tension over money and control simmered for months before exploding in a boycott by players.
. Photographs  Slide Show: At Grambling, Struggles for a Tradition-Rich Team
. Games to Watch on Saturday
General Manager John Mozeliak with the team owner Bill DeWitt Jr.

On Baseball

Cardinals' History Remains in the Details

By TYLER KEPNER

For the DeWitt family, whose roots in baseball reach back nearly a century, keeping with tradition in running the Cardinals is a priority.
A pigeon coop in Belgium. Six racing pigeons in that country have tested positive for performance-enhancing substances, including painkillers.

Sports of The Times

Pigeon Racing: Faster and Farther, but Fair?

By JULIET MACUR

Pigeon racing's followers were stunned when six Belgian birds failed tests for banned performance-enhancing drugs. It would be comical if it weren't true.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »
Arts
Matthew Bourne's Sleeping Beauty Hannah Vassallo and Chris Trenfield in a reworking of a classic at City Center.

Dance Review

After a 100-Year Sleep, a Beauty Wakes to Vampires

By BRIAN SEIBERT

"Matthew Bourne's Sleeping Beauty" takes Tchaikovsky's ballet and makes it the choreographer's own.
Innards as instrument: A piano used by the Bowed Piano Ensemble, whose leader, Stephen Scott, will soon retire.
A Farewell to Pianists Who Aim for the Gut

By ALLAN KOZINN

A Saturday night concert by Bowed Piano Ensemble, whose members reach into the piano's guts with motley tools to extract sound, may be its last in New York.
The Governor's Wife Trina Edwards, with her husband, Edwin, who served terms in the State House and in federal prison.

Television Review

Real Politician of Louisiana, at Home

By ALESSANDRA STANLEY

Edwin Edwards, the former governor of Louisiana, served a decade in prison. Now he has a young mate, a new baby and plenty of trouble on "The Governor's Wife."

NYT | European Morning Today's Headlines October 26, 2013: Angry Over Syrian War, Saudis Fault U.S. Policy.

The New York Times
NYT Apps | Subscribe: Digital / Home Delivery

Saturday, October 26, 2013



Top News
Saudi Arabia, frustrated with the United States on Syria, wants to offer more arms to the rebels, but is concerned that the weapons might get into the wrong hands.
Angry Over Syrian War, Saudis Fault U.S. Policy

By BEN HUBBARD and ROBERT F. WORTH

Saudi Arabia is worried that in trying to help the Syrian rebels on its own, it might alienate a friend and help jihadists.

News Analysis

In Spy Uproar, 'Everyone Does It' Just Won't Do

By DAVID E. SANGER

The uproar in Europe has obscured a new reality: The digital age has merely expanded the ability of nations to do to one another what they have done for centuries.
A Roma family in Nikolaevo, Bulgaria, on Thursday. Members of the ethnic group worry that their children will be taken based on the false perception that all Roma have dark features.
Roma, Feared as Kidnappers, See Their Own Children at Risk

By DAN BILEFSKY

A backlash against members of the ethnic group has fed negative stereotypes, but many say it is they who must worry about losing their children. 

Editors' Picks
A grounded World War II-era ship manned by eight Filipino servicemen who are supposed to keep China in check.

MAGAZINE

A Game of Shark and Minnow

By JEFF HIMMELMAN

The shell of a forsaken ship has become a battleground in a struggle that could shape the future of the South China Sea and, to some extent, the rest of the world.

OPINION | Op-Ed Contributor

Why So Few Women in the Panthéon?

By ROBERT ZARETSKY

Hundreds of candidates have been put forward for the honor of eternity in the hallowed shrine.

World
Children carried their belongings in Homs, Syria, this month. The United Nations is struggling with how to deliver emergency aid as the war rages.
U.N., Fearing a Polio Epidemic in Syria, Moves to Vaccinate Millions of Children

By RICK GLADSTONE

Officials said that the discovery a few weeks ago of a cluster of paralyzed young children in Deir al-Zour, a heavily contested city in eastern Syria, had prompted their alarm.
. Hardships Mounting for Refugees Inside Syria
Chancellor Angela Merkel at a news conference in Brussels on Friday.
Amid New Storm in U.S.-Europe Relationship, a Call for Talks on Spying

By ALISON SMALE

The offer was an attempt to defuse a trans-Atlantic dispute over eavesdropping by the United States that has hurt its relations with Europe and prompted calls to suspend trade talks.
. Indignation Over U.S. Spying Spreads in Europe
The Italian police on Friday identified a migrant, among more than 700 who were rescued by Italian naval and coast guard vessels from the Mediterranean.
Europe Turns Its Eye to Migration Policies, Amid Another Sea Rescue

By JAMES KANTER

The scale and urgency of the challenge was brought into stark focus by the rescue of more than 700 refugees overnight near Sicily.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World

Business
JPMorgan Chase's headquarters in New York.

DealBook

JPMorgan Reaches Deal With Agency Over Loans

By BEN PROTESS and PETER EAVIS

The Federal Housing Finance Agency, which helped forge a tentative $13 billion settlement with JPMorgan Chase, split off with its own deal, extracting a $4 billion payout from the nation's biggest bank.
. Graphic  Graphic: Tracking the JPMorgan Investigations
The deal secures continued operations for the Grangemouth oil refinery, the only one in Scotland and the source of most of the country's fuel.
Deal With Union Prevents Closing of Scottish Plant

By STANLEY REED

An eleventh-hour settlement of a dispute between Ineos and the Unite trade union will preserve hundreds of jobs at the petrochemical plant.
An employee in front of the Peugeot plant in  Aulnay-sous-Bois, France, on Friday, the day the last car rolled off the assembly line.
End of a Line Reflects a Weakened Peugeot

By DAVID JOLLY

By the time the last car rolled off the assembly line in Aulnay-sous-Bois on Friday, the plant's importance had declined amid ebbing profitability for the subcompact cars it produced.
For more business news, go to INYT.com/Business

Technology
Promised Fix for Health Site Could Squeeze Some Users

By ROBERT PEAR and SHARON LaFRANIERE

The White House said that it would fix the insurance marketplace by Nov. 30, raising the question of how people whose current policies do not comply with the law will get new coverage in time.
. In White House Pitches, Rosy View of Health Care Site
. Graphic Problems That Have Crippled HealthCare.gov
Dick Costolo, right, the chief of Twitter, outside Morgan Stanley's headquarters in New York on Friday.

DealBook

Twitter Visits Wall St. to Preview I.P.O. Roadshow

By DAVID GELLES

Twitter's roadshow may not begin until Monday, but its executives are already making the rounds in New York.
Peter Stern cashed in on Facebook, but said

Wealth Matters

Twitter Tantalizes, but Beware the I.P.O.

By PAUL SULLIVAN

Some offerings get so much attention they can cloud people's judgment, but investors must understand how a company's stock will fit in their portfolio.

Sports
Ted Ligety won seven of nine giant slalom competitions last season. At the Alpine world championships in February, he became the first man in 45 years to win three gold medals.
Ted Ligety Takes Aim at Overall Alpine Skiing Title

By KELLEY McMILLAN

The American skier emerged as a serious multidiscipline threat when he won three golds at the world championships last year.
Bale Could Start for Real Madrid in Clásico

By SAM BORDEN

Real Madrid's coach has hinted that the Welsh wing could be in the lineup at Barcelona on Saturday.
Monisha Kaltenborn, director of the Swiss-based Sauber team, who was born in India, says Formula One has failed to market itself effectively there.
India's Uncertain Grand Prix Future

By BRAD SPURGEON

As the country prepares for its third annual Formula One race this weekend, a governmental issue is now threatening to make it the last one.
For more sports news, go to INYT.com/Sports

U.S. News
Martha Gualotuna from Ecuador protested in front of Speaker John A. Boehner's office on Wednesday.
Immigration Poses Threat of Another Republican Rift

By ERIC LIPTON and ASHLEY PARKER

A push to bring legislation to the House floor, led by a coalition of executives, conservatives and evangelical leaders, could affect campaign contributions before the midterm elections.
. Graphic Graphic: Progress on an Immigration Overhaul in 5 Areas
Six years ago, Carmen Tarleton was beaten with a bat and burned beyond recognition with industrial lye in an attack by her estranged husband. She has undergone almost 60 operations, mostly skin grafts.
For Victim of Ghastly Crime, a New Face, a New Beginning

By ABBY GOODNOUGH

Six years after being beaten and burned beyond recognition, Carmen Tarleton is adjusting to a transplanted face.
Pigs ate at a farm in Middletown, Pa., in 2012.
F.D.A. Bids to Regulate Animal Food, Acting After Recall and Deaths

By SABRINA TAVERNISE

The Food and Drug Administration, hoping to prevent food-borne illness, proposed rules for pet food and farm animal feed.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US

Opinion

Op-Ed Contributor

Before Malala

By WILLIAM DALRYMPLE

Pashtun society was, for many years, a center of Gandhian nonviolent resistance against British rule.
If We're Spying, Are We Still 'Allies'?

Room for Debate

If We're Spying, Are We Still 'Allies'?
After surveillance revelations, Brazil, France and Germany may be having second thoughts about the U.S.: In what sense are they "allies"?

Editorial

N.S.A. Snooping and the Damage Done

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

Trust among allies is also a national security interest, and America's extensive eavesdropping in France and Germany undermines that trust.