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Oct 5, 2013

The Economist Group | Management Thinking, Originally Released on October 5, 2013: Management Thinking Digest: Japan - No Easy Answers








he economic revival policies of Shinzo Abe’s government, known as “Abenomics”, are being hailed by some as a credible alternative to the austerity that has been implemented across much of Europe. But they have also pushed government debt to more than US$10trn, making it the highest in the world. In our new report commissioned by Aberdeen Asset Management, Japan - No Easy Answers, we ask whether ‘Abenomics’ will live up to the hype or whether Japan will sink back into another lost decade.

On our blog site EIU editor Zoe Tabary interviews Jonathan Sand, chairman of global brand consultancy Elmwood, on the importance of corporate reputation. And Parag Khanna, senior fellow at the New America Foundation and Singapore Institute of International Affairs, examines whether corporations could replace national governments.

Finally, we'll be hosting
The Infrastructure Summit - Future Cities on October 29th in London to explore the most ingenious solutions to enable sustainable urban development, with a particular focus on networks and connections. Join in the discussion with over 150 international delegates from transport, energy, digital communications, construction and finance.
 

Denis McCauley
Editorial Director, EMEA
EIU

NYT | Global Upadte October 5, 2013: U.S. Says Navy SEALs Stage Raid on Somali Militants.

The New York Times International Herald Tribune
October 5, 2013
Compiled 20:49 GMT

Global Update

TOP NEWS

U.S. Says Navy SEALs Stage Raid on Somali Militants

By NICHOLAS KULISH and ERIC SCHMITT
A Navy SEAL team seized a senior leader of the Shabab militant group from his seaside villa in the Somali town of Baraawe on Saturday, American officials said.

Man Sought In '98 Attacks On Embassies Is Seized

By DAVID D. KIRKPATRICK
Gunmen attacked a Libyan military post southeast of the capital, Tripoli, on Saturday, an official and Libya's state news agency said.

House Approves Back Pay for Furloughed Workers

By JONATHAN WEISMAN and ASHLEY PARKER
Under the bill, the more than 1 million employees who are furloughed or working without pay will get their salaries after the shutdown ends.
U.S.

Video: The Cost of the Shutdown By the Numbers

A look at the budget standoff's effects on America's economy, institutions and government workers.
Opinion

Opinion

The View From Bangkok

By SUTHEP SRIKUREJA
A peaceful aerie - until something started falling from above.
WORLD

A Killing by Sudanese Security Forces Stokes the Anger of a Protest Movement

By ISMA'IL KUSHKUSH
The shooting of a young pharmacist has become a rallying cry for the protest movement now threatening the government's grip on power.

Court Defers Imprisonment for Journalist Covering Sinai

By DAVID D. KIRKPATRICK
A military court convicted Ahmed Abu Deraa of entering a military zone without authorization, but postponed his sentence indefinitely, a mixed decision in a test of media freedom.
BUSINESS

Mugged by a Mug Shot Online

By DAVID SEGAL
Web sites are publishing arrest photos of millions of Americans and often charging fees to remove the pictures.

What Can Be Sold in 140 Characters? That's Now the Challenge for Twitter

By VINDU GOEL
In documents filed on Thursday, Twitter noted that it has been greatly expanding its inventory of advertising slots, especially for promoted tweets.

Twitter's I.P.O. Plan Has an International Focus

By DAVID JOLLY, MARK SCOTT and ERIC PFANNER
The social-networking service said in its stock filing that more than three-quarters of its recent users are outside the United States.
TECHNOLOGY

Curtain Is Rising on a Tech Premiere With (as Usual) a Mostly Male Cast

By CLAIRE CAIN MILLER
Even as women make headway in fields like law and business, and technology zooms along as one of the fastest-growing sectors of the economy, its doors remain virtually closed to women.
DealBook

How Twitter's I.P.O. Filing Evolved to Contain New Details

By PETER EAVIS
Twitter had already filed four earlier versions of what is known as the S-1 with the Securities and Exchange Commission that had omitted some details.
SPORTS
Soccer Roundup

Suárez and Sturridge Lead Liverpool

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Manchester City ended Everton's unbeaten run in England's Premier League this season with a 3-1 win on Saturday as Álvaro Negredo and Sergio Agüero scored goals.

Women Shaping a New Path Among a Rich Baseball Tradition

By HILLEL KUTTLER
Heather Nabozny attained a milestone as the first woman known to have been a head groundskeeper, starting in 1999 with the Detroit Tigers. She was followed by Nicole McFadyen in Baltimore.

A Frustrated Rodriguez Turned on the Players Union

By SERGE F. KOVALESKI and STEVE EDER
In late August, Alex Rodriguez's personal legal team wrote a letter formally requesting the union step aside from its role as his chief advocate at arbitration.
U.S. NEWS

Bible College Helps Some at Louisiana Prison Find Peace

By ERIK ECKHOLM
A Southern Baptist Bible college inside Louisiana State Penitentiary offers bachelor's degrees in a rigorous four-year course that includes study of Greek and Hebrew.

Some in G.O.P. Try to Pick and Choose Amid Spending Fight

By JONATHAN WEISMAN
After defending their actions by saying they were taking aim at a major new government program, House Republicans set about reassembling the government they shut down, piece by piece.

In Surprise Announcement, Hagel Recalls Most Defense Department Workers

By THOM SHANKER and JONATHAN WEISMAN
Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said that he would reinstate almost all of the 400,000 civilian employees who had been sent home.
OPINION
Op-Ed Contributor

China's Economy, Back on Track

By HENRY M. PAULSON Jr.
Momentum for reform is growing. So is the leadership's will.
Editorial

Pent-Up Demand for Health Insurance

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD
The new exchanges are flooded with people who are desperate to find affordable coverage.
Op-Ed Columnist

A Terrible, Tragic Game

By CHARLES M. BLOW
Round and round we go with the Democrats and Republicans arguing over who has the "winning" message, while the government remains closed for business.

NYT | ALERT FGC BOLSA - FGC FINANCIAL MARKETS OCTOBER 5, 2013: Municipal Bonds, Stung Again / Governing by Blackmail / Sunday Dialogue: A Disillusioned Citizenry / Fund Investors, Caught in Washington’s Circus / Video: The Cost of the Shutdown By the Numbers.

The New York Times | MY ALERTS

FGC BOLSA- FGC FIN

Compiled: October 5, 2013

Municipal Bonds, Stung Again
Detroit’s bankruptcy and turmoil in Puerto Rico’s debt load have brought some added turmoil to the muni bond market. 

 

Op-Ed Columnist

Governing by Blackmail
House Republicans have taken America’s economy hostage and are using it as a bargaining chip in the most dangerous political game. 

Letters

Sunday Dialogue: A Disillusioned Citizenry
Readers discuss what has bred public distrust of government.
Fund Investors, Caught in Washington’s Circus
Uncertainty over the nation’s political standoff — as well as Federal Reserve policy — has many investment advisers urging caution as the fourth quarter begins.

Fiscal Crisis

Video: The Cost of the Shutdown By the Numbers
A look at the budget standoff’s effects on America’s economy, institutions and government workers.

NYT | Today's Headlines October 5, 2013: Boehner Urges G.O.P. Unity in "Epic Battle"

The New York Times

Today's Headlines

Saturday, October 5, 2013


Top News
From left, Representatives James Lankford, Eric Cantor, the majority leader, and Pete Sessions, with Speaker John A. Boehner.
Boehner Urges G.O.P. Unity in 'Epic Battle'

By JONATHAN WEISMAN and ASHLEY PARKER

Speaker John A. Boehner offered no clue on Friday as to how he expected Congress to get out of the dead end it has found itself in, with the government shut for a fourth day.
. Video  Video: Boehner on the Shutdown
. Latest Updates: Fiscal Crisis »
Babak Zanjani began his career selling sheepskins and became a critical actor in Iran's effort to evade sanctions on oil sales.
To This Tycoon, Iran Sanctions Were Like Gold

By THOMAS ERDBRINK

An Iranian businessman is facing new scrutiny for helping Iran's effort to evade sanctions on its oil sales.
Brent Geels, 28, co-owner of Geels Glass in Sioux Center, Iowa, says he thinks warnings about a debt default are overblown.

Common Sense

In Rural Iowa, Spending, Not the Shutdown, Raises Worry

By JAMES B. STEWART

While Representative Steve King's constituents are beginning to question his tactics and his focus on the health law, they support his core commitment to cutting the size of government. 

Editors' Picks

SPORTS

Video Video: Snowboarding at the Cardrona Halfpipe
Every August, the world's best snowboarders come to work on big-air and physics-defying in Wanaka, New Zealand.
. Related Article

OPINION | Op-Ed Contributor

China's Economy, Back on Track

By HENRY M. PAULSON Jr.

Momentum for reform is growing. So is the leadership's will.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY

"I knew the N.C.A.A. rules. I just didn't care for them."
ROY ADAMS, who cherishes his role as a benefactor for college football players, even if it means breaking a few rules.
ADVERTISEMENT
World
Gen. Vo Nguyen Giap, Who Ousted U.S. From Vietnam, Is Dead

By JOSEPH R. GREGORY

General Giap, whose victory at Dien Bien Phu forced France from Vietnam, later waged a long battle with the United States military that eventually sapped America's political will to fight.
American troops with an Afghan suspected of Taliban connections. Washington has said it has no intention of fighting the Taliban in Afghanistan after 2014.
Impasse With Afghanistan Raises Prospect of Total U.S. Withdrawal in 2014

By MATTHEW ROSENBERG

The United States and Afghanistan are struggling to reach a deal over the role American forces will play beyond next year, officials say, raising the possibility of total withdrawal.
The Chinese president, Xi Jinping, at an economic meeting in Kuala Lumpur on Friday. China's economic sway in Asia is growing.
Cancellation of Trip by Obama Plays to Doubts of Asia Allies

By JANE PERLEZ

With the cancellation of President Obama's visit to Asia, his much-promoted "pivot" to Asia was undercut, and this week China's leader, Xi Jinping, seized the opening in some of the nations Mr. Obama would have visited.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »
U.S.
Aaron Alexis had a history of infractions.
Supervisors of Navy Yard Gunman Were Told of Issues

By SERGE F. KOVALESKI

A Washington Navy Yard subcontractor kept Aaron Alexis on the job and did not require him to seek mental health treatment, an internal investigation found.
University of Mississippi Investigating Anti-Gay Heckling at Theater Performance

By KIM SEVERSON and ALAN BLINDER

In the 51 years since intergration, the university has made inclusion and racial healing a theme, but problems persist.
Workers lowered a floodgate into Hero Canal on Friday as part of a hurricane protection system for the New Orleans region.
Gulf Coast Storm Pulls Federal Workers Off Furlough

By CAMPBELL ROBERTSON

Tropical Storm Karen, though weakening on Friday, was still powerful enough to prompt evacuations and warnings of storm surges and heavy rainfall along the Gulf Coast. 

Politics
A visitor took a picture of Mount Rushmore from outside the park on Tuesday, the first day of the federal government shutdown, which closed all national parks.
Shutdown's Pinch Leaves Governors With Tough Calls

By ADAM NAGOURNEY and RICHARD PÉREZ-PEÑA

Governors across the United States are contemplating the use of state funds to keep closed parks and programs operating until the deadlock in Washington is broken.

In Practice

Shutdown Din Obscures Health Exchange Flaws

By ROBERT PEAR

Members of both parties say the federal shutdown may give the Obama administration time to work out the kinks in the insurance exchanges under its health care law.
Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel spent much of the past week on an airplane. Above, he left Seoul, South Korea, on Tuesday, headed for Tokyo.

Reporter's Notebook

Hagel's Week in Asia, Complete With Talk of Drones and Fiscal Standoff

By JENNIFER STEINHAUER

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel weighed in on the government shutdown, drones and Iran as he traveled to South Korea and Japan.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »
Business
From left, the designers Michael Kors, Diane von Furstenberg, Marc Jacobs and Tory Burch on the runway.

DealBook

New Fashion Runway: Wall Street

By PETER LATTMAN

Michael Kors had extraordinary success with an initial public offering of his brand nearly two years ago, leading other designers to consider the same.
. CommentPost a Comment | Read

Your Money

Questions Often Asked About Health Law

By TARA SIEGEL BERNARD

In the first week of the Obama administration's health care enrollment period, consumers had questions on insuring dependent children over 26 years old, immigrants and pre-existing conditions.

Off the Charts

Unemployment of Adults Falls in Germany, but Not the Rest of Europe

By FLOYD NORRIS

Among the countries in the European Union, whether or not members of the euro zone, all but Germany now have more adult unemployed workers than at the end of 2007.
. Graphic  Graphic: In Europe, Adult Unemployment Rises
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »
Technology
Twitter employees in San Francisco compete in a bean bag toss. Twitter filed documents on Thursday for an initial public offering.
What Can Be Sold in 140 Characters? That's Now the Challenge for Twitter

By VINDU GOEL

In documents filed on Thursday, Twitter noted that it has been greatly expanding its inventory of advertising slots, especially for promoted tweets.
Vijaya Gadde, general counsel at Twitter. Women in positions of power are rare in Silicon Valley.
Curtain Is Rising on a Tech Premiere With (as Usual) a Mostly Male Cast

By CLAIRE CAIN MILLER

Even as women make headway in fields like law and business, and technology zooms along as one of the fastest-growing sectors of the economy, its doors remain virtually closed to women.
Customers at a Samsung showroom in Seoul. Samsung is not only the biggest maker of smartphones, it is also the leading maker of memory chips.
HTC Reports Its First Loss, but Samsung Shows Vigor

By ERIC PFANNER

Samsung Electronics probably benefited from memory chip sales, analysts said, while HTC said it would lose about $101 million after its flagship smartphone failed to catch on.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »
Sports
Booster Proud of His Largess and Game-Day Parties

By BEN STRAUSS

Roy Adams, a well-known booster in Memphis, is called the Great Gatsby of college sports for his game-day parties and his role as a benefactor for players.
. Photographs  Slide Show: Game Day for a Booster
Alex Rodriguez's appeal of his suspension had its fifth day of hearings Friday in Manhattan.
Rodriguez Sues, Targeting Baseball and Medical Treatment

By STEVE EDER

A defiant Alex Rodriguez alleged that Major League Baseball bought the cooperation of a Biogenesis witness and that the Yankees' medical team was negligent.
. Documents  Document: Alex Rodriguez's Lawsuit Against Major League Baseball
Minnesota Coach Jerry Kill and his assistants have developed a routine to deal with his health scares.
For Coach, Seizures Are Mere Distractions

By GREG BISHOP

Jerry Kill, probably the only college football coach who has a seizure protocol for his assistants, is not allowing his health to interfere with Minnesota's efforts to rebuild.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »
Arts
The curtain call for
The Frenzied Last-Act Effort to Save City Opera

By MICHAEL COOPER and ROBIN POGREBIN

In the final days before filing for bankruptcy protection, officials at New York City Opera learned that the 70-year-old company had lost the confidence of the donors it needed to survive.
. Timeline: The Shifting Fortunes of 'the People's Opera'
Joaquin Phoenix in

Critic's Notebook

Aging, Coming of Age, and Vampires

By A. O. SCOTT

The New York Film Festival continues to have some juicy fare, with one foot in the American commercial mainstream, and another in the realm of international art cinema.
Deborah Voigt, who acknowledges her voice has changed somewhat, is mulling her future operatic roles.
A Soprano Braving the Shoals, Like a Stoical Isolde

By ANTHONY TOMMASINI

Deborah Voigt, who withdrew last month from the Washington National Opera's season-opening production of "Tristan und Isolde," talks about that decision and her future singing choices.