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Sep 29, 2013

NYT | Global Update September 29, 2013: Time Is Short, but G.O.P. Leaders Say Shutdown Can Be Avoided

The New York Times International Herald Tribune
September 29, 2013
Compiled 20:55 GMT

Global Update


TOP NEWS

Time Is Short, but G.O.P. Leaders Say Shutdown Can Be Avoided

By BRIAN KNOWLTON and JEREMY W. PETERS
House Republican leaders said they believed a government shutdown could be averted if Democrats would accept at least some of their demands to scale back the health care law.

Relatively Calm Kurdish Region of Iraq Is Shaken by Rare Attack

By TIM ARANGO
Several explosions struck Iraq's northern Kurdish region, killing at least six people and setting off chaos in the streets of the capital, Erbil.

BP Trial in 2nd Phase, to Set Amount of Oil Spilled

By CLIFFORD KRAUSS
The fines against BP hang in the balance, and depend on the level of negligence that is determined and how much oil was spilled.
U.S.

Video: A Government Shutdown, by the Numbers

A look at the costs, closings and other ramifications of a government shutdown.
Opinion

Opinion

Imagining a Remapped Middle East

By ROBIN WRIGHT
Borders could easily change under the pressures of war and ethnic conflict.
WORLD
Damascus Journal

A Surface Calm, Punctured by Artillery and Weary Arguments

By ANNE BARNARD
Syria's capital is now a city of checkpoints, new arrivals and a pervasive sense of war weariness, where even those of opposite views seem worn out by their differences.

Dueling Narratives in Iran After Breakthrough in U.S. Relations

By MICHAEL SCHWIRTZ
Iran's foreign minister said there was a "real chance" for a pact with the United States over his country's nuclear program, but his deputy said Tehran would "never trust America 100 percent."

New Turmoil for Italy Amid Resignation of 5 in Berlusconi's Party

By ELISABETTA POVOLEDO
The resignations of five ministers set off a new crisis that could put the political and financial stability of Europe at risk.
BUSINESS

Cameron Accelerates Program to Help Britons Buy Homes

By STEVEN ERLANGER
Prime Minister David Cameron said he would immediately begin the second phase of a program that lets buyers get mortgages with small down payments.

Experimental Free-Trade Zone Opened in Shanghai

By DAVID BARBOZA
China's government has billed the zone as a major step for financial overhauls and economic experimentation.

Chinese Banker Sentenced for Amassing Real Estate With Fake Documents

By ANDREW JACOBS
The banker, Gong Aiai, was sentenced to three years in prison for forging or illegally purchasing documents to buy dozens of houses.
TECHNOLOGY
Disruptions

Guided by Touch Screens, Blind Turn to Smartphones for Sight

By NICK BILTON
Advocates for the blind say smartphones and tablets could be the biggest assistive aid to come along since Braille was invented in the 1820s.

When BlackBerry Reigned (the Queen Got One!), and How It Fell

By IAN AUSTEN and JENNIFER DANIEL
A short history of the device from a tiny Canadian company that created and, for a long time, dominated what became the smartphone market.
SPORTS

Kenyan Wilson Kipsang Sets World Record at Berlin Marathon

By JERÉ LONGMAN
Wilson Kipsang shaved 15 seconds off the previous record of 2:03:38, set two years ago in Berlin by his countryman Patrick Makau.

In Arsène, Arsenal Utterly Trusts

By ROB HUGHES
Arsène Wenger on Monday celebrates 17 years - and counting - as the manager, coach, and mentor of every aspect of Arsenal's business.

New Zealand to Face South Africa in Rugby Championship Final

By EMMA STONEY
The two top-ranked teams in the world overcame Argentina and Australia in the penultimate round of the Rugby Championship to set up the decisive clash in Johannesburg next weekend.
U.S. NEWS
Bearing Arms

Children and Guns: The Hidden Toll

By MICHAEL LUO and MIKE McINTIRE
Children shot accidentally - usually by other children - are collateral casualties of the accessibility of guns in America, their deaths at once heart-rending and eminently preventable.

As Opening Day Nears, Insurance Exchanges Scramble to Prepare

By ABBY GOODNOUGH
Officials are warning that despite fevered efforts, their new online markets where people can shop for health plans will not be fully operational at first.

Federal Agencies Lay Out Contingency Plans for Possible Shutdown

By MICHAEL S. SCHMIDT, THOM SHANKER and ANDREW SIDDONS
Federal agencies have been asked to identify "nonessential" employees, who will be forced to stay home if Congress fails to pass a spending bill.
OPINION
Editorial

Reform With Chinese Characteristics

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD
China is establishing a free-trade zone in Shanghai. Will it lead to the broader changes the country needs?
Opinion

Knock, Knock, Knockin' on Nobel's Door

By BILL WYMAN
Bob Dylan, a fierce and uncompromising poet whose writing, for 50 years and counting, still crackles with relevance, should win the Nobel Prize in Literature.
Gray Matter

Are We Hard-Wired for War?

By DAVID P. BARASH
The emerging popular consensus about our biological predisposition to warfare is troubling: it is scientifically weak and morally unfortunate.