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Sep 14, 2013

Gerald Celente - Fox 40 Binghamtom - September 11, 2013.

NYT | Global Update September 14, 2013: Deal Reached to Destroy Syria's Chemical Arsenal

September 14, 2013
Compiled 20:45 GMT

Global Update


TOP NEWS

Deal Reached to Destroy Syria's Chemical Arsenal

By MICHAEL R. GORDON
Under a "framework" agreement, international inspectors must be on the ground in Syria by November, Secretary of State John Kerry said, at a news conference with the Russian foreign minister, Sergey V. Lavrov.

Many Doubt Death Sentences Will Stem India Sexual Attacks

By ELLEN BARRY and BETWA SHARMA
Four men convicted of brutally raping and murdering a 23-year-old woman were sentenced to die by hanging, a sentence that drew cheers from some but skepticism from others.

The Payday at Twitter Many Were Waiting For

By NICK BILTON and VINDU GOEL
Twitter's public offering will not be nearly as large as Facebook's $16 billion offering, but it will still create dozens of multimillionaires.
World

Video: A Sense of Insecurity

The brutal rape of a young woman in New Delhi last year has led Indians to ask why are women so unsafe in public spaces. Daily travels are often filled with a sense of insecurity.
Opinion

Gray Matter

It's Not 'Mess.' It's Creativity.

By KATHLEEN D. VOHS
Need inspiration? Make a mess.
WORLD

Reshaping Brazil's Retail Scene, Inspired by Vegas and Vanderbilt

By SIMON ROMERO
A department store tycoon takes unfettered American-style consumerism to a gaudy new level.

As Turmoil Persists, Mubarak Returns to Courtroom in Egypt

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Hosni Mubarak, the former president of Egypt, returned to court in Cairo in the killings of about 900 protesters during the 2011 uprising.

Philippine Leaders Descend on Strife-Torn City as Hopes of Cease-Fire Fade

By FLOYD WHALEY
Top Philippine leaders discussed strategies Saturday for dealing with violence that has killed at least 55 people, displaced more than 62,000 and crippled a once peaceful trading enclave.
BUSINESS
Technophoria

On Campus, a Faculty Uprising Over Personal Data

By NATASHA SINGER
Faculty members at Penn State University are objecting to an employee wellness plan that asks them to disclose medical and other personal information.
DealBook

With Facebook's Tumultuous I.P.O. in Mind, Twitter Tries to Value Its Shares

By PETER EAVIS
Twitter has fewer users, but it must nevertheless try to convince advertisers that those users are as valuable as those on Facebook.
Corner Office

Bob Moritz, on How to Learn About Diversity

By ADAM BRYANT
The chairman and senior partner of PricewaterhouseCoopers says he gained new perspectives on diversity during his time working for the firm in Japan.
TECHNOLOGY

Girl's Suicide Points to Rise in Apps Used by Cyberbullies

By LIZETTE ALVAREZ
Rebecca Ann Sedwick, 12, leaped to her death from a platform at an abandoned cement plant near her home in Florida, in a case that highlights the growing use of cellphone apps for cyberbullying.
Bits Blog

5 Reasons That Innovation at Twitter Might Take a Hit

By AMY O'LEARY
A Stanford researcher has found that innovation steeply declines after a company goes public. What does that mean for Twitter?

Video: Twitter's I.P.O. by the Numbers

A look at the messages, users and revenue behind the global information network. Twitter announced on Thursday that it had filed for an initial public offering.
SPORTS

Son of a Land of Midnight Sun

By KAREN CROUSE
Led by Henrik Stenson, first in the European Tour's Race to Dubai and the PGA Tour's FedEx Cup standings, Swedish golfers, male and female, have surged.
On Soccer

A Winter World Cup? Gulati Says Not So Fast

By SAM BORDEN
Sunil Gulati of the United States says three weeks is too soon to have an educated vote on whether to change the dates of the 2022 World Cup in Qatar.

For Ireland, Long Road to an Exclusive Cricket Club

By HUW RICHARDS
Ireland has had many recent successes, but it needs to show that its progress is sustainable and not merely the product of a single generation of unrepeatable talent.
U.S. NEWS

Secret Society Dips Toe in City Politics, Prompting Lawsuit

By CAMPBELL ROBERTSON
At the University of Alabama, a longtime political secret society has run into trouble after becoming involved in an off-campus election.

Not to Be, Um, Trifled With, Texas Guards Its Slogans

By MANNY FERNANDEZ
"Don't Mess With Texas," the trademarked slogan, has become something far bigger: an identity statement, and the state is touchy about who uses it and how.

An Intervention for Malibu

By PETER HALDEMAN
Growth of high-profile rehabilitation centers has Malibu residents seeking relief.
OPINION
Opinion

Assange as Tyrant?

By JULIA BAIRD
Some former allies say the WikiLeaks founder acted like an ordinary politician in his Australian Senate campaign.
Op-Ed Columnist

What War Means

By FRANK BRUNI
When we talk about future interventions, we must own up to the heavy price some Americans paid in past ones.
Patrick Chappatte

A Russian Take on Syria

Putin takes center stage.

NYT | Global Update September 14, 2013: U.S.-Russia Talks on Syria's Arms Make Progress

The New York Times International Herald Tribune
September 14, 2013
Compiled 04:15 GMT

Global Update

TOP NEWS

U.S.-Russia Talks on Syria's Arms Make Progress

By PETER BAKER and MICHAEL R. GORDON
President Obama's decision came as American and Russian negotiators meeting in Geneva on Friday moved closer to an agreement that would seek to ultimately strip Syria of its chemical weapons.
Pentagon Memo

Pentagon in Back Seat as Kerry Leads Charge

By THOM SHANKER
The defense secretary and the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff share a reluctance to use military might overseas, in contrast to the Pentagon in the George W. Bush years.

Many Doubt Death Sentences Will Stem India Sexual Attacks

By ELLEN BARRY and BETWA SHARMA
Four men convicted of brutally raping and murdering a 23-year-old woman were sentenced to die by hanging, a sentence that drew cheers from some but skepticism from others.
World

Video: Syria, Through a Screen

As thousands of Syrians flee the war every day, many have become indefinitely separated from their families and from a country that is increasingly becoming divided and unstable.
Opinion

Op-Ed Contributor

Overpopulation Is Not the Problem

By ERLE C. ELLIS
There really is no such thing as a human carrying capacity on the earth.
WORLD

Fighting Over the Rock

By RAPHAEL MINDER
A dispute among Spain, Britain and Gibraltar threatens an economic lifeline for 7,000 Spaniards who cross the border daily to work in the tiny territory.

In China, the Dangers of Due Diligence

By JANE PERLEZ
Background checks, audits and other investigations are just part of doing business in most countries, but in China those jobs can pose big risks.

German Candidates Compete in Battle of Magazine Covers

By ALISON SMALE
Some Germans raised eyebrows when the Social Democrat challenger to Chancellor Angela Merkel was shown gesturing with his middle finger while Ms. Merkel was depicted as Europe's leader.
BUSINESS

The Payday at Twitter Many Were Waiting For

By NICK BILTON and VINDU GOEL
Twitter's public offering will not be nearly as large as Facebook's $16 billion offering, but it will still create dozens of multimillionaires.
DealBook

With Facebook's Tumultuous I.P.O. in Mind, Twitter Tries to Value Its Shares

By PETER EAVIS
Twitter has fewer users, but it must nevertheless try to convince advertisers that those users are as valuable as those on Facebook.
Off the Charts

Investors in Europe See a Glass Half Full and Rising

By FLOYD NORRIS
It remains to be seen whether optimism in the face of negatives like high unemployment is rooted in complacency or a belief that the worst is over.
TECHNOLOGY
Bits Blog

Twitter vs. Facebook: A Tale of Two Sites

By JENNA WORTHAM
All eyes are on Twitter as it prepares for an initial public offering of stock, and many are comparing it to Facebook, which went public last year. How do the two social networking sites actually compare?
Bits Blog

For Developers, a Downside to a Public Twitter

By JENNA WORTHAM
For the many developers who built services on top of Twitter, and helped the service become popular, a Twitter I.P.O. could mean a bleak future for their products.
Bits Blog

Twitter's Magic Recs Experiment Personalizes What You Follow

By JENNA WORTHAM
Twitter is working on a new way to showcase new and interesting accounts, but so far only a tiny number of users know about it.
SPORTS
On Soccer

A Winter World Cup? Gulati Says Not So Fast

By SAM BORDEN
Sunil Gulati of the United States says three weeks is too soon to have an educated vote on whether to change the dates of the 2022 World Cup in Qatar.

For Ireland, Long Road to an Exclusive Cricket Club

By HUW RICHARDS
Ireland has had many recent successes, but it needs to show that its progress is sustainable and not merely the product of a single generation of unrepeatable talent.

Scorer's Call: Rivera Gets Win, Not Save

By DAVID WALDSTEIN
After the Yankees' victory Thursday in Baltimore, the official scorer at Camden Yards invoked a rule that allowed him to take the win away from an ineffective pitcher - here, Dave Robertson - and give it to another.
U.S. NEWS

Water, Now Fire, and Shore Nightmare Goes On

By KATE ZERNIKE
The day after a beachfront blaze destroyed dozens of businesses on the Jersey Shore, owners struggled to summon what it would take to start over so soon after starting over.

Girl's Suicide Increases Worry as Bullies Use New Web Sites

By LIZETTE ALVAREZ
Rebecca Ann Sedwick, 12, leaped to her death from a platform at an abandoned cement plant near her home in Florida, apparently one of a growing list of children driven to suicide after online taunting.

Colorado Floodwaters Force Thousands to Flee

By DAN FROSCH and JACK HEALY
Many residents marveled at how swiftly the rains had swamped their homes and carved up the mountainsides, transforming picturesque towns and vacation communities into scenes of devastation.
OPINION
Op-Ed Contributor

The Duty to Protect, Still Urgent

By MICHAEL IGNATIEFF
Humanitarian intervention is facing a crisis of legitimacy.
Editorial

Collusion in the Potash Market

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD
A dispute between two obscure mining companies demonstrates why the World Trade Organization needs the power to look into anticompetitive partnerships.
Latitude

Margin of Terror

By HUMA YUSUF
The British government is doing little to help Muslims - particularly recent converts among blacks - resist the draw of extremism.