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Sep 8, 2013

Is manipulation in gold about to begin again? by Toby Connor: GATA | THE GATA DISPATCH SEPTEMBER 08, 2013.

Toby Connor: Is manipulation in gold about to begin again?

8p ET Sunday, September 8, 2013
Dear Friend of GATA and Gold:
Financial letter writer Toby Connor writes today that he's "not a big conspiracy buff" but he suspects that gold price suppression is about to resume in a big way.
Of course GATA is not a "conspiracy buff" either and complaints of gold price suppression require no speculation or conspiracy theory, just some of the documentation GATA has collected over the years --
http://www.gata.org/taxonomy/term/21

-- documentation that Connor and most other gold market analysts never seem to get around to, preferring to speculate, since it requires no research. But maybe a little progress is signified when people who profess to be skeptical of gold price suppression acknowledge that evidence is starting to weaken their skepticism.
Connor's commentary is headlined "Is the Manipulation in the Metals about to Begin Again?" -- of course the manipulation never stopped -- and it's posted at GoldSeek here:

http://news.goldseek.com/GoldSeek/1378678864.php

CHRIS POWELL, Secretary/Treasurer
Gold Anti-Trust Action Committee Inc
.

AlJazeera News: Thousands of Mexicans denounce reforms


Neighbors favor Romanian gold mine while those at a distance are opposed: GATA | THE GATA DISPATCH SEPTEMBER 08, 2013.

Neighbors favor Romanian gold mine while those at a distance are opposed

Romanians Rally For and Against Planned Gold Mine
By Alison Mutler
Associated Press
via Yahoo News
Sunday, September 8, 2013

http://news.yahoo.com/romanians-rally-against-planned-gold-181640432.htm...

BUCHAREST, Romania -- Thousands of Romanians demonstrated on Sunday both for and against a planned gold mine that would use cyanide in the extraction process. The project would create the biggest gold mine in Europe, razing four mountains to make way for an open-pit mine.
Supporters say the mine would bring vital jobs and investment to the deprived area in northwest Romania. But opponents say it will present an environmental risk.
In the Romanian capital, thousands of people protesting against the mine shouted "Save Rosia Montana," referring to the town where it would be located and where gold has been mined for more than 2,000 years.

The anti-mine protesters in Bucharest's University Square urged lawmakers not to pass legislation that would approve the mine as a "special national interest" creating foreign investment and jobs in the deprived area. They later blocked a main road in the city.
Some 6,000 people rallied in the city of Cluj, which is near the mine, also urging parliament to block the legislation, Mediafax news agency reported.
In the town of Rosia Montana, thousands of miners used their annual rally on miner's day to urge Parliament to allow the mine to open, saying it would create jobs and investment, local authorities said. Rosia Montana Town Hall put the turnout at 10,000 people.
For the past week there have been protests in Bucharest and other Romanian cities against the draft bill the government has put forward that would allow a Canadian company, Gabriel Resources, to mine gold and silver there.

* * *

Join GATA here:
Gold Investment Symposium 2013
Luna Park Conference Center, Sydney, Australia
Wednesday-Thursday, October 16-17, 2013
http://gold.symposium.net.au/
Mines and Money Australia
Melbourne Conference and Exhibition Centre
Tuesday, October 29-Friday, November 1, 2013
http://www.minesandmoney.com/
New Orleans Investment Conference
Sunday-Wednesday, November 10-13, 2013
Hilton New Orleans Riverside Hotel
New Orleans, Louisiana
https://jeffersoncompanies.com/landing/speakers?IDPromotion=613011610080...
* * *

NYT | Global Update September 08, 2013: Assad Denies Gas Attack; White House Presses a Strike

The New York Times International Herald Tribune
September 8, 2013
Compiled 20:14 GMT

Global Update

TOP NEWS

Assad Denies Gas Attack; White House Presses a Strike

By MICHAEL S. SCHMIDT
As the White House chief of staff appeared on Sunday morning news shows to make the administration's case for an airstrike, President Bashar al-Assad of Syria said in a CBS interview that his government was not behind a chemical attack.

With the World Watching, Syria Amassed Nerve Gas

By DAVID E. SANGER, ANDREW W. LEHREN and RICK GLADSTONE
Despite an international effort to block it, Syria's governing Assad family exploited large loopholes, lax enforcement and a far greater emphasis on limiting the spread of nuclear arms.

Kerry Announces Saudi Support for Syrian Strike

By MICHAEL R. GORDON
Meeting with Arab League foreign ministers, Secretary of State John Kerry said other declarations of support would come soon.
U.S.

Video: Think Back: Limits of Presidential Power

While President Obama seeks Congress' approval for military action in Syria, Writer at Large Sam Tanenhaus looks at earlier American presidents who worked to expand their powers.
Opinion

Op-Ed Guest Columnist

Weighing War, Peace and Polls

By JONATHAN TEPPERMAN
History shows there's a great deal a president can do to convince a skeptical public that military intervention is worth the risks.
BUSINESS

Greek Prime Minister Says Positive Economic Data Points to Austerity Easing

By NIKI KITSANTONIS
Prime Minister Antonis Samaras said the Greek economy had the smallest contraction since 2010 and the improvement was largely due to a strong rebound in tourism.

Chinese Trade Surplus at Highest Level Since December

By KEITH BRADSHER
Figures for August are bolstered by improving demand for the country's goods in major markets.

Google in Fight Over Content That Appears in Search Results

By DAVID JOLLY
Max Mosley, the former head of Formula One, has asked a Paris court to order the Internet giant to create an algorithm to filter racy photos of him from its search results.
TECHNOLOGY

From Myspace's Ashes, Silicon Start-Ups Rise

By EILENE ZIMMERMAN
Many founders and former executives of Myspace have found new entrepreneurial life in the blossoming tech industry of Los Angeles.

Verizon and F.C.C. Net Neutrality Battle Set in District Court

By EDWARD WYATT
Verizon and other companies that spent billions of dollars to build their Internet pipelines are fighting the F.C.C.

Legislation Seeks to Bar N.S.A. Tactic in Encryption

By SCOTT SHANE and NICOLE PERLROTH
A congressman's proposal would prohibit the agency from installing "back doors" into encryption, the electronic scrambling that protects e-mail and other communications.
SPORTS

Shots Fired to the Body Often Engender Shrugs Instead of Spats

By STUART MILLER
Body shots have long been a common practice in tennis. But they seem to have become more controversial or at least more commented upon lately.

Unrest Behind the Dream Car

By JOHN F. BURNS
With the approach of the Monza race, Ferrari officials acknowledge, there has been the annual round of fractiousness among engineers, racing team officials and executives.
Soccer Roundup

Mexico's Coach Is Fired After Home Loss to Honduras

By THE NEW YORK TIMES
Mexico fired the coach of its national soccer team after Friday night's home loss to Honduras in World Cup qualifying.
U.S. NEWS

Harvard Business School Case Study: Gender Equity

By JODI KANTOR
An aggressive program intended to foster female success brought improvements, but also resentment and uncertainty.
Ozarks Journal

A Hideaway Where 'Out in the Ozarks' Has Multiple Meanings

By JOHN ELIGON
Tucked in the Missouri Ozarks is a place where gay men are unabashedly celebratory: Cactus Canyon Campground, a 700-acre, clothing optional, all-male retreat.

House Republicans in California Find a Struggle on Immigration

By JENNIFER MEDINA
Representing districts full of Latino voters who support a path to citizenship for illegal immigrants, some G.O.P. congressmen in California are rejecting the party line.
OPINION
Op-Ed Guest Columnist

Weighing War, Peace and Polls

By JONATHAN TEPPERMAN
History shows there's a great deal a president can do to convince a skeptical public that military intervention is worth the risks.
Op-Ed Columnist

Same War, Different Country

By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
Who will prevail in the Arab awakening, Hobbes, Khomeini or Jefferson?
Op-Ed Columnist

Barry's War Within

By MAUREEN DOWD
Trying for gutsy in handling Assad and his cronies, the president pauses for a gut check.

Syria's War: AlJazeera News Bulletin - 19:30 GMT update September 08, 2013.

If Australia's New Government Would Revive Mining , Confront Gold Price Suppression: GATA | THE GATA DISPATCH September 08, 2013.

If Australia's new government would revive mining, confront gold price suppression

1:08p ET Sunday, September 8, 2013

Australia has just elected a new government, switching from the Labor Party to the Liberal and National Party coalition, and Reuters today quotes the new government's likely trade minister, Andrew Robb, as saying the new government's objectives will include reviving the country's mining industry:

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/09/08/us-australia-election-idUSBRE9...
 
Of course GATA has an idea of how to do that: End the Western central bank gold price suppression scheme particularly and the commodity price suppression scheme generally. Indeed, seven weeks ago your secretary/treasurer sent to the governor of the Reserve Bank of Australia, Glenn Stevens, an international express mail letter requesting an invitation to make a presentation to the bank about the gold price suppression scheme and the harm it does to Australia and other commodity-producing countries. Included with the letter were copies of some of the voluminous official documentation of the scheme --

http://www.gata.org/taxonomy/term/21
-- lest the RBI think GATA just makes this stuff up.
Predictably enough the bank has not replied to the letter even to acknowledge its receipt, perhaps because the bank knows very well how the international currency markets are rigged and would prefer Australians not to know and begin wondering about the bank's complicity and failure to defend their country's interests.
But your secretary/treasurer still plans to visit Australia next month to speak at the annual Gold Symposium in Sydney --

http://gold.symposium.net.au/

-- and the Mines and Money Australia conference in Melbourne --

http://www.minesandmoney.com/australia/?utm_source=Mines_and_Money_Porta...

-- and would be delighted to make presentations to representatives of the new government as well as to Australian news organizations.

So your secretary/treasurer will be grateful to any of GATA's Australian friends who could convey this to people in their new government or news organizations. I can be reached at

CPowell@GATA.org.
CHRIS POWELL, Secretary/Treasurer
Gold Antii-Trust Action Committee Inc.

RT News September 08 2013: Jihaddists re-take historic Syrian Christian Village / Protesters World Rally Against Military Strike on Syria / NSA Can Tap into Blackberry...


08 September, 2013

Jihaddists re-take historic Syrian Christian village as stand-off continues
Islamist Nusra Front forces have re-captured Syria’s oldest Christian community from government troops in a night of fighting. The small village of Maaloula, once a peaceful spiritual place, became a battlefield on Wednesday.
11:13 16
‘We say no war’: Protesters across the world rally against military strike on Syria
Protests were held across the globe on Saturday to speak out against a US-led strike on Syria, as world leaders ask Washington to wait for the results of a UN report before taking military action.
02:43 27
NSA can tap into BlackBerry, iOS, and Android systems – report
The US National Security Agency (NSA) can access data on smart phones using the world’s most popular systems including iOs, Android, and even BlackBerry - which markets itself to be highly secure, according to a new report.
00:19 22

NYT | Today's Headlines September 08, 2013: With the World Watching, Syria Amassed Nerve Gas

The New York Times

Today's Headlines

Sunday, September 8, 2013


Top News
With the World Watching, Syria Amassed Nerve Gas

By DAVID E. SANGER, ANDREW W. LEHREN and RICK GLADSTONE

Despite an international effort to block it, Syria's governing Assad family exploited large loopholes, lax enforcement and a far greater emphasis on limiting the spread of nuclear arms.
Nitin Nohria, left, the dean of the Harvard Business School, acknowledging Brooke Boyarsky as a Baker scholar in May.
Harvard Business School Case Study: Gender Equity

By JODI KANTOR

An aggressive program intended to foster female success brought improvements, but also resentment and uncertainty.
The Stolichnaya production line at a factory in Riga, Latvia. The exact nationality of the vodka brand is hard to pin down.
Facing Fury Over Antigay Law, Stoli Says 'Russian? Not Really'

By ANDREW HIGGINS

A boycott of vodka by gay activists critical of Russia has focused on Stolichnaya, made in a nation with experience of Russian oppression. 

Editors' Picks

SPORTS

America's Cup: Racing Above Water
This year's America's Cup vessels are more flying machine than yacht. The twin hulls of the catamarans can rise from the water and hydrofoil at speeds approaching 50 m.p.h.

OPINION | Opinion

The Value of Suffering

By PICO IYER

Calamity cracks you open, moves you to change your ways. Sometimes.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY

"You weren't supposed to talk about it in open company. It was a dirty secret that wasn't discussed."
KATHLEEN L. McGINN, a professor, on gender equality issues at the Harvard Business School.
ADVERTISEMENT
World
Tony Abbott, center, the leader of Australia's Liberal-National coalition, celebrated his victory on Saturday with his family in Sydney.
Vote Ends Australian Labor Party's Six-Year Run in Power

By MATT SIEGEL

The election ends six tumultuous years of leadership and ushers into power a strong conservative Liberal-National coalition.
Hangman Lacks Work, and Pakistan Looks to Provide

By DECLAN WALSH and TAHA SIDDIQUI

Executions could soon be reinstated in Pakistan, drawing sharp disapproval from an unlikely coalition of critics, including jihadist commanders and business leaders, albeit for entirely different reasons.
In
In Egypt, a Welcome for Syrian Refugees Turns Bitter

By SARAH MOUSA and KAREEM FAHIM

Syrians, along with other foreigners, were made scapegoats as the military took power and warned of external plots to destabilize Egypt, unleashing a suffocating xenophobia in the news media and on the streets.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »
U.S.
In order to help build more houses, Otsego, Minn., like other cities in the Twin Cities area, has relaxed its development fees.
Prices Are Rising for New Homes, and the Land They Are Built On

By SHAILA DEWAN

Land brokers and development companies in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area are reporting that after years of no growth, the price of land is increasing rapidly.
Rick Fausett at Cactus Canyon Campground, a clothing optional, all-male hideaway in Ava, Mo.

Ozarks Journal

A Hideaway Where 'Out in the Ozarks' Has Multiple Meanings

By JOHN ELIGON

Tucked in the Missouri Ozarks is a place where gay men are unabashedly celebratory: Cactus Canyon Campground, a 700-acre, clothing optional, all-male retreat.
. Photographs  Slide Show
Storied U.S. Barracks Closes With Little Fanfare

By ALISON SMALE

Campbell Barracks in Heidelberg, Germany, which, as the headquarters of the United States Army in Europe, issued the orders for millions of American soldiers, closed on Friday.
. Video  Video: Goodbye to Heidelberg

Politics
Harry Reid, the Senate majority leader, and Dianne Feinstein, the chairwoman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, before a closed briefing on Friday.
Obama's Battle for Syria Votes, Taut and Uphill

By MARK LANDLER and JONATHAN WEISMAN

People on Capitol Hill said the initial campaign for strikes against Syria proved unpersuasive, but administration officials insist the debate will continue when Congress returns from recess.
. Interactive  Interactive Graphic: Where Lawmakers Stand on Military Action in Syria
Kerry and French Foreign Minister Appeal Together for Strike Against Syria

By MICHAEL R. GORDON

Laurent Fabius, the French foreign minister, who appeared with Secretary of State John Kerry, argued that a punishing military strike was needed to redraw the red line against the use of chemical weapons.
Immigration campaigners nearing the end of a 285-mile
House Republicans in California Find a Struggle on Immigration

By JENNIFER MEDINA

Representing districts full of Latino voters who support a path to citizenship for illegal immigrants, some G.O.P. congressmen in California are rejecting the party line.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »
Business
Purple light bathed passengers awaiting takeoff on a Virgin America flight from San Francisco.
At Virgin America, a Fine Line Between Pizazz and Profit

By MATT RICHTEL

An airline whose sleek style rates highly with its passengers is still struggling to make money for its investors, and has lost $675 million since 2007.
Antonis Samaras, the prime minister of Greece, left, at the annual international trade fair in Thessaloniki.
Greek Prime Minister Says Positive Economic Data Points to Austerity Easing

By NIKI KITSANTONIS

Prime Minister Antonis Samaras said the Greek economy had the smallest contraction since 2010 and the improvement was largely due to a strong rebound in tourism.

Fair Game

Find the Loan Behind the Loans

By GRETCHEN MORGENSON

When regulators accuse financial firms of predatory lending, shouldn't they track down where these firms are getting their capital?
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »
Technology
Finding new ventures after Myspace: From left are Josh Brooks, Amit Kapur, Chris DeWolfe, Jim Benedetto, Colin Digiaro, Steve Pearman, Josh Berman and Aber Whitcomb.
From Myspace's Ashes, Silicon Start-Ups Rise

By EILENE ZIMMERMAN

Many founders and former executives of Myspace have found new entrepreneurial life in the blossoming tech industry of Los Angeles.
. For Myspace Alumni, Finding Other Shores
Joel Workman of Stantec with a drone designed for  mapping in land planning. It weighs just over 1.5 pounds.

Novelties

Preflight Turbulence for Commercial Drones

By ANNE EISENBERG

Though drones operated by businesses won't be in wide use until 2015, some lawmakers and others are already moving to restrict them.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »
Sports
Members of the Tokyo 2020 delegation celebrated after Tokyo was awarded the 2020 Olympic Games during the 125th I.O.C. session in Buenos Aires.
For 2020 Olympics, I.O.C. Picks Tokyo, Considered Safe Choice

By JERÉ LONGMAN and MARTIN FACKLER

Tokyo was selected to host the 2020 Summer Games, beating out Istanbul and Madrid in a major victory for a country still recovering from a nuclear plant meltdown.
. Hopes for Renewal in Japan, but Also a Host of Challenges
The Cowboys' owner, Jerry Jones, right, with his first hire as coach, Jimmy Johnson, in 1990.
Cowboys: A Team Flush With Money, Not Success

By BILLY WITZ

Dallas last won the Super Bowl after the 1995 season, and hasn't been a contender since, but today the franchise is valued at $2.3 billion.
Rafael Nadal topped Richard Gasquet, 6-4, 7-6 (7-1), 6-2. Nadal holds a 21-15 edge over Novak Djokovic, his next opponent.
A Showdown of No. 1 vs. No. 2

By CHRISTOPHER CLAREY

Novak Djokovic, who beat Stanislas Wawrinka, will face Rafael Nadal, who beat Richard Gasquet, in the United States Open men's final, the 37th episode of their long-running miniseries.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »
Arts
From left, Daniel Craig, Rachel Weisz and the rising star Rafe Spall, who play the love triangle in  the
Two's Company, Three's a Show

By MAUREEN DOWD

Daniel Craig, Rachel Weisz and Rafe Spall discover plans for a Broadway revival of Harold Pinter's "Betrayal" with fewer pauses and "more animal."
. Photographs  Slide Show | The Vulnerable Mr. Bond
Ed Harris and Amy Madigan in
Bold Experiments in Stage Chemistry

By CHARLES ISHERWOOD

On Broadway and off this fall, some shows feature unlikely pairings onstage. Some matchups are natural, some decidedly not.
 Ian McKellen, left, and Patrick Stewart in a performance of
Scene Partners Step Into the Void

By BEN BRANTLEY

Ian McKellen and Patrick Stewart will team up in "No Man's Land" and "Waiting for Godot" on Broadway this season.
For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »
N.Y./Region
Volunteers in Park Slope, Brooklyn, calling registered Democrats on Bill de Blasio's behalf.
Mayor's Race Offers Varied Twists in Last Push

By DAVID W. CHEN

With just days to go before the primary election, the leading candidates are immersed in the final, frantic phase of the campaign: getting people to the polls to vote.
John A. Catsimatidis celebrated his birthday with supporters and campaign staff on Saturday at the Metropolitan Republican Club in Manhattan.
Republican Candidates Seek Precision From Their Outreach Plans

By THOMAS KAPLAN

Joseph J. Lhota and John A. Catsimatidis are seeking to drum up support and turn out hard-to-find conservative voters in Tuesday's primary.
Peter Cott, left, and Kenneth Leedom were given an embroidered pillow on their 50th anniversary. They update it every year.