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Aug 17, 2013

How American Hopes for a Deal in Egypt Were Undercut: NYT | Global Update August 17, 2013.

August 17, 2013
Compiled 20:45 GMT

Global Update


TOP NEWS

How American Hopes for a Deal in Egypt Were Undercut

By DAVID D. KIRKPATRICK, PETER BAKER and MICHAEL R. GORDON
Egypt's military crackdown has left President Obama in a no-win position: risk a partnership that has been the bedrock of Middle East peace, or stand by while allies try to hold on to power by mowing down opponents.

Standoff Erupts at a Mosque in Cairo as Egypt's Leaders Struggle for Order

By KAREEM FAHIM and MAYY EL SHEIKH
Riot police stood guard outside a mosque where Islamist protesters were sheltering Saturday, deepening the sense that Egypt was descending into anarchy.

A Secret Race for Abandoned Nuclear Material

By ELLEN BARRY
Over a period of 17 years, Russian and American scientists collaborated to remove hundreds of pounds of plutonium and highly enriched uranium from a nuclear test site in Kazakhstan.
World

Video: Two Narratives of the Violence in Egypt

With hundreds of protesters dead, supporters and opponents of the Muslim Brotherhood are circulating opposing videos to push each side's view of the calamity.
Opinion

Taking Note

The Rupee's Decline

By VIKAS BAJAJ
India's currency fell sharply against the dollar. Inflation in the country remains high even as growth is slowing.
WORLD

Aug. 16 Updates on Protests in Egypt

By ROBERT MACKEY
The Lede is following events in Egypt on Friday, where Islamist protesters have taken to the streets to demonstrate against the military-backed government.

Working-Class Cairo Neighborhood Tries to Make Sense of a Brutal Day

By KAREEM FAHIM
Many Egyptians say that the military had to crack down on pro-Morsi supporters and that the protesters were holding back the country with endless sit-ins.

Divers Recover 4 Bodies From Indian Submarine

By GARDINER HARRIS
Officials intend to use DNA analysis to identify the badly burned bodies found on the sub, which sank in Mumbai with 18 crew members aboard.
BUSINESS

Layoffs Taboo, Japan Workers Are Sent to the Boredom Room

By HIROKO TABUCHI
Facing a sluggish economy and increasing competition, Japan's prime minister and major companies want to reduce longstanding restrictions on dismissing full-time workers.
Common Sense

For Airlines, It May Be One Merger Too Many

By JAMES B. STEWART
Three airline mergers had gained approval since 2008, but the Justice Department has hardened its stance with a proposed union between American and US Airways.

Trash Into Gas, Efficiently? An Army Test May Tell

By PAUL TULLIS
The United States Army will be the first to test a system by Sierra Energy to turn waste - whether banana peels, used syringes, old iPods, even raw sewage - into fuel.
TECHNOLOGY
The Idea

An Inventor Wants One Less Wire to Worry About

By JACK HITT
In college, Meredith Perry wondered why wireless devices needed wires for recharging. That question has led to her work on a way to transmit electrical power via sound waves.
Technophoria

When You Can't Tell Web Suffixes Without a Scorecard

By NATASHA SINGER
Plans to expand the number of top-level Internet domains beyond familiar ones like .com and .net have generated a rush of activity - as well as opposition.

Hanging Out at the E-Mall

By JENNA WORTHAM
Web entrepreneurs are moving closer to duplicating the real-world feel of a mall, where shoppers can pop in and out of multiple stores, and browse with the advice of friends.
SPORTS

As Soccer Season Starts, There's Money Left to Be Spent

By ROB HUGHES
A billion dollars has been spent by the big European clubs, but it seems at least as much is left to be gambled before the trading window shuts on Sept. 2.

Russian Pole-Vaulter Backs Disputed Law

By DAVID M. HERSZENHORN and CHRISTOPHER CLAREY
Yelena Isinbayeva, one of Russia's most prominent athletes, said she supported a measure that has been criticized in the West as being antigay.
Straight Sets

Video: A TimesTalks Conversation With John McEnroe

By THE NEW YORK TIMES
With the United States Open on the horizon, John McEnroe joins Jason Stallman, The New York Times's sports editor, for a chat about tennis and more.
U.S. NEWS

N.S.A. Often Broke Rules on Privacy, Audit Shows

By CHARLIE SAVAGE
The violations of privacy rules, which were often inadvertent, cast new light on the agency's potential for intrusions on Americans' communications.
Beliefs

In God's Name, or Baby 'Messiah,' Competing Claims of Religious Freedom

By MARK OPPENHEIMER
A Tennessee judge last week forcibly changed a baby's name from Messiah to Martin. The case raises two questions, one legal and the other religious.

Despite Fears, King Memorial Is Ready for Anniversary

By ASHLEY SOUTHALL
A problem was resolved on Thursday night when a crew from the Park Service's preservation unit smoothed the area where an inscription had been removed.
OPINION
Opinion

Dear Emma...

By MARK VANHOENACKER
A pen-pal friendship is pure, conjured serendipity - a random, unweighted connection with someone you never knew existed and would surely never meet.
Opinionator

Not All Industrial Food Is Evil

By MARK BITTMAN
Tomato farmers and canners move toward sustainability - and fairness.
Op-Ed Columnist

The Past's Future Republican

By FRANK BRUNI
Chris Christie, Ted Cruz and Rand Paul may be grabbing headlines, but Jeb Bush shouldn't be forgotten, least of all by Republicans concerned about the party's health.

Haynes: Bullion demand strong; Norcini: Speculative money back in gold futures: GATA | THE GATA DISPATCH AUGUST 16, 2013.

Haynes: Bullion demand strong; Norcini: Speculative money back in gold futures

7:34p ET Saturday, August 17, 2013

In the weekly monetary metals market review at King World News, coin and bullion dealer Bill Haynes of CMI Gold and Silver in Phoenix reports that demand remains strong, particularly for silver, while futures market analyst Dan Norcini reports that speculative money is returning to the gold and silver futures markets. An excerpt from the interview is posted at the King World News blog here:

http://kingworldnews.com/kingworldnews/KWN_DailyWeb/Entries/2013/8/18_In...

CHRIS POWELL, Secretary/Treasurer
Gold Anti-Trust Action Committee Inc.

NYT | Today's Headlines August 17, 2013: Blood and Chaos Prevail in Egypt, Testing Control .

Saturday, August 17, 2013

   Today's Headlines



Top News
Supporters of the deposed president, Mohamed Morsi, protested near a mosque in Cairo on Friday.
Blood and Chaos Prevail in Egypt, Testing Control

By DAVID D. KIRKPATRICK

Egypt erupted into chaos on Friday, raising doubts about the authorities' capacity to maintain order, as opponents of the military takeover fought security forces and civilians in the street.
. Day's Updates From the Lede

News Analysis

Ties With Egypt Army Constrain Washington

By THOM SHANKER and ERIC SCHMITT

With the myriad, though largely invisible, ways the Egyptian military assists United States interests in the region, Egyptian generals have some leverage in facing Washington and its pressure to end a crackdown.
. Thrust Into Nonstop Turmoil, an Obama Adviser Counsels Pragmatism
Jerry Brown has had successes few would have imagined when he became governor of California in 2010, and his re-election, should he run, seems almost assured.
Brown Cheered in Second Act, at Least So Far

By ADAM NAGOURNEY

On his second tour as governor of California, Jerry Brown has succeeded in ways few would have imagined when he took office in 2010.
Editors' Picks

U.S.

Slide Show Slide Show: The Return of the Gray Seal
Gray seals are popular with tourists, but Cape Cod fishermen say the growing population is competition for fish.
. Related Article

OPINION | Op-Ed Contributor

Headstone for an Apocalypse

By PETER BRANNEN

Just across the river from New York City, the looming cliffs of the Palisades are monuments to a global-warming catastrophe.

UOTATION OF THE DAY

"The problem with these ordinances is that they turn victims of crime who are pleading for emergency assistance into 'nuisances' in the eyes of the city. They limit people's ability to seek help from police and punish victims for criminal activity committed against them."
SANDRA S. PARK, a lawyer with the A.C.L.U., on the rise of "crime free" housing ordinances, which some say cause tenants to choose between calling 911 and being evicted from their homes.

World
Egyptian military guarding the remains of the Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque in Cairo, near which Islamist supporters of Mohamed Morsi had staged their protest.

Political Memo

Attacks on Protesters in Cairo Were Calculated to Provoke, Some Say

By RICK GLADSTONE

The ferocity of the attacks appears to have been a deliberate calculation of the military-appointed government to provoke violence from the Muslim Brotherhood and its allies, historians said Friday.
Shiite Muslims gathered Friday for a televised speech by Hasan Nasrallah, Hezbollah's leader.
Hezbollah Makes Vow to Step Up Sunni Fight

By BEN HUBBARD

Hasan Nasrallah, the leader of Hezbollah, accused radical Sunnis of orchestrating a car bombing that killed 24 in Beirut.
Thousands of platinum miners and their supporters gathered in Marikana, South Africa, to commemorate the killing of 34 striking workers by the police one year ago.
Killing of Strikers Alters South Africa Politics

By LYDIA POLGREEN

A year after the worst case of police violence since the end of apartheid, the killings have put the African National Congress on the defensive.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »
U.S.
Lakisha Briggs, a victim of domestic violence, faced eviction last year under a public nuisance ordinance in Norristown, Pa., that punishes landlords for 911 calls.
Victims' Dilemma: 911 Calls Can Bring Eviction

By ERIK ECKHOLM

Aiming to save neighborhoods from blight and to ease burdens on the police, municipalities have adopted ordinances requiring landlords to weed out disruptive tenants.
New York City during a blackout in 2003. More than 150 companies and groups will take part in a drill that will simulate attacks on the power grid.
As Worries Over the Power Grid Rise, a Drill Will Simulate a Knockout Blow

By MATTHEW L. WALD

A primary goal of the drill, scheduled for November, is to explore how governments would react as the loss of the grid cripples the supply chain for everyday necessities.
Messiah's name was changed to Martin by a Tennessee judge.

Beliefs

In God's Name, or Baby 'Messiah,' Competing Claims of Religious Freedom

By MARK OPPENHEIMER

A Tennessee judge last week forcibly changed a baby's name from Messiah to Martin. The case raises two questions, one legal and the other religious.
Politics
Susan E. Rice, left, seen in the White House Rose Garden in June, has been on the job as national security adviser for six weeks.
Thrust Into Nonstop Turmoil, an Obama Adviser Counsels Pragmatism

By MARK LANDLER

Susan E. Rice, in her six weeks as national security adviser, has dealt with a terrorist scare, deteriorating relations with Russia and, now, the chaos in Egypt.
N.S.A. Calls Violations of Privacy 'Minuscule'

By CHARLIE SAVAGE

John DeLong, the agency's director of compliance, said that the overwhelming majority of "incidents" shown in an internal audit were the result of unintentional human or technical errors.
Fox Decides Not to Produce Hillary Clinton Mini-Series

By BILL CARTER

The decision by Fox Television Studios not to be involved in producing a hotly debated mini-series for NBC was a financial decision, one executive said, and not a political one.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »
Business
Miwako Sato joined Sony right out of high school in 1974.
Layoffs Illegal, Japanese Workers Head to Boredom Room

By HIROKO TABUCHI

Facing a sluggish economy and increasing competition, Japan's prime minister and major companies want to reduce longstanding restrictions on dismissing full-time workers.

DealBook

As Investors Jump Ship, SAC Looks to Cut Back

By ALEXANDRA STEVENSON and PETER LATTMAN

SAC's prospects are grim as the fund, while operating under a criminal indictment, prepares to become leaner with virtually no outside investors.
Tara Siegel Bernard

Your Money

One Dip Into a 401(k) Often Leads to Another

By TARA SIEGEL BERNARD

Borrowing from retirement savings can make sense, but Fidelity found that many people become repeat customers, taking multiple loans.
. Graphic  Graphic: 401(k) Loans May Hurt Your Bottom Line
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »
Technology
Deena Varshavskaya, chief executive of Wanelo, a digital retailer, wanted to make online shopping less fragmented.
Hanging Out at the E-Mall

By JENNA WORTHAM

Web entrepreneurs are moving closer to duplicating the real-world feel of a mall, where shoppers can pop in and out of multiple stores, and browse with the advice of friends.
Carl Icahn is seeking a seat on Dell's board.

DealBook

Judge's Ruling Removes Hurdles to a Dell Takeover Bid

By MICHAEL J. DE LA MERCED

Chancellor Leo Strine of Delaware's Court of Chancery also defended the work by a special committee of Dell's board, saying that its actions benefited shareholders.
The company reported earnings amid a controversial proposal from its founder, Michael Dell, to take the company private.
Dell's Profit Declines 72% on Sluggish Sales of PCs

By BRIAN X. CHEN

To keep sales up, the company cut prices for many of its products but sacrificed profit margins.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »
Sports
Alex Rodriguez said he was behind his teammates and felt he had a lot of

On Baseball

Rodriguez Offers Support, but Finds Little in Return

By TYLER KEPNER

Alex Rodriguez, who is fighting a 211-game suspension, has become the target of players upset that he is allowed to continue to play when they say it is clear he violated the rules.
Chad Lorkowski, right, allowed one hit in six innings Friday, but his team didn't have any and lost its opening game, 3-0.
Dreaming in Extra Large

By JOANNE C. GERSTNER

The Woods-Shores team from Michigan is already the focus of national attention because of one of its pitchers, the 6-foot-3 Chad Lorkowski.
Curtis Malone led D.C. Assault, one of the most successful youth basketball programs, to numerous titles. He is charged with drug trafficking.
Bewilderment in Wake of Arrest of A.A.U. Coach

By SCOTT CACCIOLA

The drug trafficking charges against Curtis Malone, the president and co-founder of D.C. Assault, have stunned those who worked with him and the A.A.U. program.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »
Arts
Pei-Shen Qian
Struggling Immigrant Artist Tied to $80 Million New York Fraud

By SARAH MASLIN NIR, PATRICIA COHEN and WILLIAM K. RASHBAUM

Pei-Shen Qian, a 73-year-old immigrant, is believed to have produced more than 60 works that were attributed to Modernist masters.
Ivete Sangalo first toured America in 2010, including a show at Madison Square Garden, above.
Ivete Sangalo, a Brazilian Belter, Extends Her Reach

By LARRY ROHTER

Ivete Sangalo, the most popular female vocalist in Brazil, is appearing in Newark on a United States tour that is part of a global marketing effort.
Pizzagalli Center for Art and Education  The Shelburne Museum in Vermont opens its new visitors' center on Sunday.

Museum Review

A Haven for Wit and Whimsy Dusts Off Its Welcome Mat

By EDWARD ROTHSTEIN

A new 18,000-square-foot visitors' center opens on Sunday at the Shelburne Museum in Vermont, capitalizing on the institution's quirky holdings and expanding its educational mission.
For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »
N.Y./Region
Christie Amends Medical Marijuana Restrictions

By KATE ZERNIKE

Gov. Chris Christie agreed to expand New Jersey's program, but stopped short of what some parents say is necessary to improve their children's access to treatment.
City Slows Plan for Market-Rate Units on Public Housing Land

By MIREYA NAVARRO

The Bloomberg administration faced criticism for its plan to lease to developers some of the land at eight housing projects and has shifted the plan to allow more time for discussion.
The actor Tom Ligon at home in Greenwich Village near the window an intruder tried to come through on Aug. 1.

Crime Scene

He Used to Be on Police Dramas, Then He Met a Bad Guy in Real Life

By MICHAEL WILSON

The actor Tom Ligon surprise