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Jul 13, 2013

Syria Weighs Its Tactics As Pillars of Its Economy Continue to Crumble: NYT I Global Update July 13, 2013.

July 13, 2013
Compiled 20:53 GMT

Global Update


TOP NEWS

Syria Weighs Its Tactics As Pillars of Its Economy Continue to Crumble

By ANNE BARNARD
Syria is increasingly isolated in the face of a growing economic crisis, more reliant than ever on credit from its main remaining allies.

Battery Is Not Suspected in New Fire on Boeing 787

By CHRISTOPHER DREW
While investigators in London said they had not found the cause of the incident, the damage was not near either of the plane's lithium-ion batteries.

Russian Officials Say They Didn't Receive an Asylum Request From Snowden

By DAVID M. HERSZENHORN
Senior Kremlin officials said Russia's Federal Migration Service had not yet received a formal appeal for asylum from Edward J. Snowden, the former intelligence contractor.
World

Video: Snowden Makes Appeal From Airport

Video of Edward J. Snowden with international rights activists in Moscow on Friday was posted on the Russian news site Life News.
Opinion

Op-Ed Contributor

Why the French Love a Parade

By ROBERT ZARETSKY
Rousseau insisted that parades are the only "entertainments which republics need."
WORLD

City in Russia Unable to Kick Asbestos Habit

By ANDREW E. KRAMER
To residents of Asbest in Russia's Ural Mountains, living with a pervasive carcinogen is the alternative to having no livelihood at all.

Echoes From the Roman Ghetto

By DAVID LASKIN
Beyond today's festive scene in this neighborhood by the Tiber River is a somber and not so ancient past for the city's Jews.

Loose Equipment Cited In Train Crash in France

By STEVEN ERLANGER
The train accident outside Paris on Friday that killed at least six people and injured dozens of others was linked to a loose rail joint.
BUSINESS

Before Blast, Hauling Oil Revived a Tiny Railroad

By IAN AUSTEN
The Montreal, Maine and Atlantic Railway, part of Rail World Inc., was benefiting from a contract to move oil from North Dakota to New Brunswick, Canada, before last week's train disaster in Quebec.
Novelties

The Artificial Heart Is Getting a Bovine Boost

By ANNE EISENBERG
Fifteen years in development, a new artificial heart that is fashioned in part from cow tissue is soon to be tested in human patients.
TECHNOLOGY

Has Patent, Will Sue: An Alert to Corporate America

By DAVID SEGAL
The number of patent-infringement lawsuits has soared, and Erich Spangenberg's firm files a big chunk of them. It has sued 1,638 companies in the last five years.

How a Typical Patent Battle Took an Unexpected Turn

By DAVID SEGAL
Erich Spangenberg often sues companies, contending patent infringement. So it was a surprise when he took the side of a small company facing such a suit over a new phone app.

Twitter Yields to Pressure in Hate Case in France

By SOMINI SENGUPTA
Twitter has agreed to identify several users who posted anti-Semitic comments on its service, and whom French authorities are seeking to prosecute for violating that country's anti-hate laws.
SPORTS

McIlroy, a Native Son, Divides Ireland

By KAREN CROUSE
Since becoming the second Irish golfer to win multiple majors, Rory McIlroy has distanced himself from his roots, which has many in Ireland questioning his loyalties.
Sports of The Times

Here Lie 2 Grand Slam Golf Dreams

By DAVE ANDERSON
The mystique of golf's most elusive quest, the modern professional Grand Slam, only increased after two of the sport's greatest players had their best chances die at Muirfield.

Toiling in Anonymity, Lead-Out Riders Blaze the Paths for Sprinters

By JAMES DAO
On Saturday, the support men had their day in the sun. Matteo Trentin, who usually works for Cavendish on the Omega Pharma-Quick Step team, won Stage 14.
U.S. NEWS

Texas Senate Approves Strict Abortion Measure

By JOHN SCHWARTZ
Gov. Rick Perry is expected to sign the bill, one of the strictest anti-abortion measures in the country. Democrats had previously blocked the measure with a filibuster that rallied abortion-rights supporters.

Zimmerman Jurors Convene for Second Day

By LIZETTE ALVAREZ
The jury's deliberations on Saturday will involve whether or not George Zimmerman's shooting of Trayvon Martin was in self-defense.

Kansas Official Holds Line Against Moderation in Debate on Immigration

By JOHN ELIGON
Kris W. Kobach, Kansas' secretary of state, is not budging in his arguments against moderation.
OPINION
News Analysis

Art That Turns Both Heads and Stomachs

By ERIK PIEPENBURG
Seeking thrills in entertainment that makes us faint, swoon or vomit.
Op-Ed Columnist

Tweeting Toward Sacrilege

By FRANK BRUNI
Musing on Egypt and sexual violence, Joyce Carol Oates saw that when you question religion, all hell breaks loose.
Op-Ed Columnist

The House's Immigration Dilemma

By ROSS DOUTHAT
There are risks wherever Republicans look.

 

 

Dreamliners return to skies following fire: The Telegraph Front Page - Finance; July 13, 2013.

Saturday, July 13, 2013




Finance

Dreamliners return to skies following fire

Finance   Boeing Dreamliner flights take off as scheduled a day after two incidents sparked fresh concerns about the Boeing aircraft.

China 'eyes stake in UK nuclear project'

Co-op launches review into £1.5bn black hole

Portugal pushed closer to the brink

Invensys and Phoenix deals herald M&A boom
 
comment

Charles Moore : The BBC doesn't tell the story of the great majority

Graeme Archer : Children born out of wedlock are loved – and will vote

Matthew Norman : We didn’t budget for the Chancellor’s bracelet
 
most viewed

Culture: BBC doesn't tell the story of the great majority

Technology: America falls out of love with Apple and Google

Fashion: 10 Best: summer beauty coolers
 
How about that

Brazilian man dies after cow falls through his roof on top of him

Canadian engineers creare human powered helicopter

'Haboob' blankets parts of Arizona
 
Video Editor's Choice

Video Editor's Choice   Goodwood 2013 - day one highlights

23 police officers injured in Belfast violence

US TV station 'sorry' for fake Asiana pilot names

Pedal power helicopter wins $250,000 prize

Snowden Renews Plea for Moscow to Grant Asylum: NYT I Today's Headlines July 13, 2013.


Today's Headlines

Saturday, July 13, 2013

   

Top News
An image of the former C.I.A. employee Edward J. Snowden after he met with some Russian public figures at a Moscow airport.
Snowden Renews Plea for Moscow to Grant Asylum

By ELLEN BARRY and ANDREW ROTH

After weeks of silence, the former N.S.A. contractor Edward J. Snowden appealed for help in gaining asylum in Russia as he continued to seek passage to Latin America.
. Video Video: Meeting in Moscow
Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. has made it harder for prosecutors to get around a legal hurdle to secret searches.
Holder Tightens Rules on Getting Reporters' Data

By CHARLIE SAVAGE

The new guidelines announced by Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. would make it harder for prosecutors to obtain calling records from telephone companies without giving news organizations notice.
Opponents and supporters of new abortion restrictions in Texas gathered Friday at the Capitol.
Texas Senate Vote Puts Bill Restricting Abortion Over Final Hurdle

By JOHN SCHWARTZ

Gov. Rick Perry is expected to sign the bill, one of the strictest anti-abortion measures in the country. Democrats had previously blocked the measure with a filibuster that rallied abortion-rights supporters.
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »

Editors' Picks

BUSINESS

Video Video: Cutbacks on 'The Rez'
At Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, one of the poorest parts of the United States, the budget cuts known as sequestration have slashed millions of federal dollars in funding.
. Related Article

OPINION | Op-Ed Contributor

Rooting for Mother Teresa

By ADA CALHOUN

Her case for sainthood has always seemed like a slam-dunk.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY

"One child, one teacher, one book and one pen can change the world."
MALALA YOUSAFZAI, who was shot by the Taliban last year after speaking out in favor of girls' education in Pakistan.
ADVERTISEMENT
World
Hundreds of thousands of supporters of Mohamed Morsi prayed at the Rabaa al-Adawiya Mosque in Cairo on Friday, during a rally demanding his reinstatement.
Hardening Split in Egypt as Islamists Stage Huge Demonstrations

By BEN HUBBARD

The size of the protests underlined the large section of society that has rejected the military intervention that deposed President Mohamed Morsi.
. Photographs  Slide Show: Islamists Step Up Protests in Egypt

The Saturday Profile

Kosovo's Thaci Aspires to Statesmanship, but Guerrilla Past Haunts Him

By DAN BILEFSKY

Prime Minister Hashim Thaci, who led Kosovo's bloody guerrilla war in the 1990s, is being hailed for a power-sharing deal with Serbia, but his history evokes the region's ethnic enmities.
Malala Yousafzai, a Pakistani girl who was shot by the Taliban, was introduced before she spoke to the Youth Assembly at the United Nations in New york on Friday.

The Lede

Malala Yousafzai, Girl Shot by Taliban, Makes Appeal at U.N.

By JENNIFER PRESTON

On her 16th birthday, Malala Yousafzai spoke at the United Nations and called on world leaders to make education available and compulsory for every child.
. Photographs  Slide Show: Girl Shot by Taliban Speaks at U.N.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »
U.S.
George Zimmerman wipes sweat from his face shortly after arriving in the courtroom on Friday.
Zimmerman Case Goes to Jury, With Defense Urging It to Remove Emotion

By LIZETTE ALVAREZ

In closing arguments, the defense emphasized George Zimmerman's fears for his own life and the deadly potential in a slab of concrete.
. The Zimmerman Trial, Day by Day
Turbines in central Kansas, where there are few major power lines.
Ideas to Bolster Power Grid Run Up Against the System's Many Owners

By MATTHEW L. WALD

A fragmented system, with conflicting interests, poses hurdles for improvements that the past three presidents have called a priority.
The big reveal: Ruth Bourdain is Josh Friedland, a freelance writer in Maplewood, N.J.
A Secret Food Satirist Comes Out of the Pantry

By JULIA MOSKIN

The identity of @ruthbourdain, a Twitter avatar created to poke fun at the pretensions of the culinary elite, is revealed.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »
Politics
Janet Napolitano, the Homeland Security Department secretary, with President Obama in 2010.
Napolitano Stepping Down as Homeland Security Chief

By PETER BAKER and TAMAR LEWIN

Janet Napolitano, who has overseen an expansive portfolio as President Obama's secretary of homeland security, plans to become president of the University of California system.
Senator Mitch McConnell, left, and Senator Harry Reid traded barbs on the Senate floor Thursday as they debated proposed changes to Senate rules that would limit the filibuster.

Congressional Memo

A Day of Friction Notable Even for a Fractious Congress

By JENNIFER STEINHAUER

Both the House and Senate erupted in a furor that went on for much of Thursday over a farm bill and a move to limit filibusters.
Dozens of people waited to enter the Senate gallery at the State Capitol in Austin on Friday.
Texas Democrats, Energized, Face Hurdles in Turning a Red State Blue

By JONATHAN MARTIN and JOHN SCHWARTZ

The recent filibuster against new abortion restrictions has ignited enthusiasm among Democrats about the governor's race in 2014. But Texas is still a very conservative state.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »
Business
The Queen of Sheba, a Boeing 787 Dreamliner that caught fire at Heathrow Airport on Friday.
Boeing 787 Catches Fire in London

By CHRISTOPHER DREW and JAD MOUAWAD

The incident, on a plane with no passengers aboard, took place about seven weeks after 787s returned to the skies after being grounded because of hazards with a new type of battery.
James B. Stewart

Common Sense

Fair Play Measured in Slivers of a Second

By JAMES B. STEWART

Regulators are taking a second look at media companies that try to generate revenue by charging fees for early access to financial information.
JPMorgan's profit on mortgages fell 14 percent in the last quarter.

DealBook

JPMorgan and Wells Fargo Feel First Chill of Rising Interest Rates

By JESSICA SILVER-GREENBERG and BEN PROTESS

The net earnings of $6.5 billion at JPMorgan Chase, often seen as a bellwether for the broader banking industry, handily exceeded Wall Street's expectations.
. Video  Video: Wall Street Feigns Modesty
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »
Technology
Twitter Yields to Pressure in Hate Case in France

By SOMINI SENGUPTA

Twitter has agreed to identify several users who posted anti-Semitic comments on its service, and whom French authorities are seeking to prosecute for violating that country's anti-hate laws.
Hulu Owners Call Off Sale, Instead Pledging to Invest to Take On Rivals

By BRIAN STELTER

The streaming-video Web site had been seeking bids for months. The owners - 21st Century Fox, the Walt Disney Company and NBCUniversal - instead decided not to sell.
Amar G. Bose, chairman of Bose, with a Wave radio in 1993.
Amar G. Bose, Acoustic Engineer and Inventor, Dies at 83

By GLENN RIFKIN

Mr. Bose's namesake company became synonymous with high-quality audio systems and speakers for home users, auditoriums and automobiles.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »
Sports
Baseball is being assisted by the ex-Secret Service director Mark J. Sullivan in pursuing players suspected of doping.
Doping Inquiry Has Baseball Playing Tough

By STEVE EDER

In contrast to how Major League Baseball once dealt with performance-enhancing drugs, officials are using tough means to expose some of the sport's biggest stars.
Wet weather affected Robinson Cano when he batted in the third inning at Yankee Stadium.

Yankees 2, Twins 0

Yankees Outlast a Cold Rain and, Yet Again, the Twins

By DAVID WALDSTEIN

The game was halted for 1 hour 13 minutes in the bottom of the fourth inning, but starter Hiroki Kuroda came back out in the fifth, and Mariano Rivera earned his 30th save.
. Interactive Box Score | Roundup: Davis's 35th Homer Helps Orioles Beat Blue Jays
Oday Aboushi, shown with his family when he played at Virginia, said he was proud of his Palestinian heritage and of being born in the United States.
Jets' Aboushi Faces Aspersions for Being Palestinian

By BEN SHPIGEL

The Jets' Oday Aboushi spoke about his Palestinian-American upbringing at a convention last month, creating an outcry online with some suggesting he had terrorist ties.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »
Arts
Edward Carrasco, at work on a Steinway at the factory in Queens. Steinway recently sold its building in Manhattan; now the company will have new owners.
Notes of Sorrow in Changes at Steinway

By JAMES BARRON

With Steinway & Sons up for sale, pianists worry that the products just won't be the same.
Harrison Ford, center, confronting Asa Butterfield in
Author's Views on Gay Marriage Fuel Call for Boycott

By MICHAEL CIEPLY

A boycott campaign against the coming film "Ender's Game," prompted by the anti-gay views of the author of the novel that inspired the movie, has suddenly gained traction.
The Newsroom Jeff Daniels returns as this series starts a second season on HBO, Sunday night at 10, Eastern and Pacific times, 9, Central time.

Television Review | 'The Newsroom'

Romance, Scoops and a Pesky Libel Suit

By ALESSANDRA STANLEY

"The Newsroom" is still righteous and romantic, but its second season has a story line about a libel suit that pulls viewers past the rocks and eddies of liberal piety.
For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »
N.Y./Region
Scott M. Stringer in Brooklyn on Friday. Mr. Stringer, running for city comptroller, is eager to neutralize Eliot Spitzer with a series of attacks on his record.
Surprise, Your Rival Is Spitzer. Reaction? Oy.

By MICHAEL BARBARO

Scott M. Stringer, the Manhattan borough president running for city comptroller, had been running a sedate campaign - until Eliot Spitzer said he wanted the job.
In 1929, acoustical engineers used a new measurement of sound called the decibel to assess the noise levels in Times Square.

What? | The Long War on Loud

Many Pleas for Quiet, but City Still Thunders

By EMILY S. RUEB

Despite numerous noise codes and aggressive campaigns to silence New York City over the last century, the racket has roared on.
. Interactive Timeline: New York's War on Noise
. Behind City's Painful Din, Culprits High and Low
Jim Buck, near Central Park in 1964, is considered the first professional dog walker in New York City. He ran a business in which he and two dozen assistants walked more than 150 dogs a day.
Jim Buck, Who Made Walking Dogs a Job, Dies at 81

By MARGALIT FOX

Mr. Buck, a thin man who commanded the leashes of a half-dozen charges at a time, is considered the person who professionalized dog walking in New York City.
For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork »
Travel
Restaurants and cafes serving kosher food line the Via del Portico d'Ottavia in the old Jewish ghetto of Rome.
Echoes From the Roman Ghetto

By DAVID LASKIN

Beyond today's festive scene in this neighborhood by the Tiber River is a somber and not so ancient past for the city's Jews.
To See America, Be a Traveler, Not a Tourist
Two acclaimed writers discuss everything from getting off the interstate and slowing down to the importance of recording your trips.
Rough Cut This rustic map treatment highlights the middle strip of America the author will explore.

Frugal Traveler

Help the Frugal Traveler Explore the Heartland

By SETH KUGEL

In a twist on the cross-country road trip, Seth Kugel is driving from Louisiana to North Dakota. Problem is, he doesn't know the territory. That's why he needs you.
For more travel news, go to NYTimes.com/Travel »
Today's Video
Video Video: The New Royal Succession
Gender will no longer be an issue for the baby of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge under a new succession rule for the British monarchy.
. Related Article
Video Video: This Week's Movies: July 12, 2013
The New York Times film critics on "Pacific Rim," "Fruitvale Station" and "Crystal Fairy."
Video Video: Life and Death, Then Living
Given a diagnosis of H.I.V. in 1991, Michelle Lopez was sure she and her daughter were dying. Her life was turned upside down when she realized new treatments were allowing them to live.
For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »
Editorials

Editorial

Missing: The Food Stamp Program

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

By brutally stripping food aid from its farm bill, the House ended a tradition of decency.

Editorial

Bolstering Trade and Growth

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

A trade agreement between the United States and Europe will aid the economy and benefit consumers and businesses.

Editorial

Reckless Banking, Inadequate Rules

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

A new derivatives deal falls short of what's needed to protect American taxpayers and the global economy from the calamitous effects of reckless bank trades.
For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »
Op-Ed
Charles M. Blow

Op-Ed Columnist

The Sadness Lingers

By CHARLES M. BLOW

George Zimmerman and Trayvon Martin are forever linked, across life and death, across bad decisions and by opposite ends of a gun barrel.
. Columnist Page
Gail Collins

Op-Ed Columnist

The House Just Wants to Snack

By GAIL COLLINS

How the House of Representatives came to pass the farm part of the farm bill while leaving food stamps hanging.
. Columnist Page
Good Night, Sweet Soprano

Opinionator

Good Night, Sweet Soprano

By DICK CAVETT

James Gandolfini was a remarkable actor with a powerful physique, but he couldn't lift the diminutive, starstruck author off the ground.
For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »