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Jun 15, 2013

BBC Breaking News; June 15, 2013: Erdogan in new protest warning.



  Breaking News  

Erdogan in new protest warning

Turkish PM Recep Tayyip Erdogan issues new warning to protesters to evacuate Istanbul's Gezi Park before Sunday
For more details, see the BBC News website
 

The Economist Group I Management Thinking Digest - Power from big data.


























The rollout of intelligent networks, smart grids and smart meters are shifting the dynamics of the power sector towards an approach characterised by growing volumes of data. Our latest report, Power from big data, sponsored by T-Systems, assesses European utilities' readiness to manage expanding data flows now and in the years ahead. The research examines why big data is moving up the agenda, how utilities plan to reap the benefits, and how they are tackling obstacles to becoming more data and consumer-centric.

On our blog site, James Chambers, an EIU editor, explores wardrobe options when at risk of being heckled by G8 protesters. And Malcolm Keay, a senior research fellow at the Oxford Institute for Energy Studies, argues why investment incentives alone will not be enough to decrease carbon generation.

Finally we'll be hosting The Bellwether Series 2013: Australia on July 17th in Sydney. Now in its fourth year, the event will convene strategic finance decision makers including senior policymakers, business leaders and leading thinkers to examine the critical financial challenges facing Australia.


Denis McCauley
Editorial Director, EMEA
EIU

































The New York Times Today's Headlines: June 15, 2013.

 

Saturday, June 15, 2013

Today's Headlines



Top News
Heavy Pressure Led to Decision by Obama on Syrian Arms

By PETER BAKER

When President Obama agreed to send small arms and ammunition to Syrian rebels, he had to be almost dragged into the decision by advisers, critics and even Bill Clinton.
Hassan Rowhani, waving his ballot, was one of six candidates running for president. Early tallies had Mr. Rowhani, a moderate cleric, gaining a strong lead, according to the interior minister.
Moderate in Iranian Election Takes Strong Lead in Early Returns

By THOMAS ERDBRINK

The cleric Hassan Rowhani, the field's most moderate candidate, held a decisive edge in preliminary results, followed by Mohammad Baqer Ghalibaf, Tehran's popular mayor.
. Photographs  Slide Show
A photo provided by Judge Edward R. Korman shows his induction ceremony in 1985. In the front row, from left, Edward I. Koch, Robert H. Bork, Gov. Mario M. Cuomo and Judge Korman.
Behind Scolding of the F.D.A., a Complex and Gentle Judge

By PAM BELLUCK

Judge Edward R. Korman, who berated the government for limiting the use of a morning-after pill, calls himself "a compassionate conservative," but his politics are hard to pin down.
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »

Editors' Picks

WORLD

Video Video: Syria's Wounded Generation
At an after-care center near Turkey's border with Syria, civilians and combatants recover from life-altering injuries. The Times's Mac William Bishop speaks to casualties of Syria's brutal civil war.

OPINION | Op-Ed Contributor

Greedy Gardeners

By MARIELLE ANZELONE

The activists campaigning for urban farms should not forget the wildflowers, bees and butterflies that are critical to our survival.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY

"To hell with you if you do not believe in our election."
AYATOLLAH ALI KHAMENEI, Iran's supreme leader, on American skepticism about the balloting.
ADVERTISEMENT
World
Ecuador Legislature Approves Curbs on News Media

By WILLIAM NEUMAN and MAGGY AYALA

The measure, long sought by President Rafael Correa, would impose fines for coverage deemed by regulators as unfair.
Protesters remained in Taksim Square in Istanbul on Friday after self-described leaders reached a tentative deal with Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan.
Some Protesters in Turkey Disavow Agreement With Premier to End Park Sit-In

By CEYLAN YEGINSU and TIM ARANGO

Gezi Park remains occupied by defiant protesters who on Friday mostly disavowed a compromise between their self-declared leaders and Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan.
A rebel fighter in Aleppo, Syria. The United States has decided to provide arms to some Syrian rebels.
Aleppo Pounded, Rebels Weigh U.S. Vow of Aid

By BEN HUBBARD

A rebel stronghold convulsed with some of the heaviest fighting in months, as activists debated how the United States' decision to send arms would affect their fight to topple the Syrian president.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »
U.S.
Kevyn Orr, the Detroit emergency manager, has asked creditors to accept pennies on the dollar.
Detroit's Creditors Are Asked to Accept Pennies on the Dollar

By STEVEN YACCINO

The city's emergency manager, Kevyn Orr, said sacrifices "from Wall Street and Main Street" were necessary to save Detroit.
The Brookside apartments in downtown Columbia, Mo., are among the luxury housing options now available to college students.
In Student Housing, Luxuries Overshadow Studying

By JOHN ELIGON

As developers try to outdo the amenities that their competitors offer in college towns, concern is growing about the academic and social consequences of upscale off-campus student housing.
Ronald Brown, a veteran of the 1991 Persian Gulf war, has had health problems since 1992.
Researchers Find Biological Evidence of Gulf War Illnesses

By JAMES DAO

New findings are bolstering the view that mysterious symptoms in Persian Gulf war veterans are fundamentally biological in nature, as opposed to psychological, the result of combat stress.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »
Politics
Laura Poitras makes films about a world changed since 9/11.
Player in Leaks Case, Out From Behind Camera

By NOAM COHEN

The documentarian Laura Poitras says her role in the leaking of American surveillance programs was "not something I was seeking out."
Senator John Cornyn spoke with reporters about an immigration bill in Washington on Tuesday.
In Senate, an Immigration Bill Savior or Saboteur?

By ASHLEY PARKER

With his border security plan, Senator John Cornyn, Republican of Texas, has emerged as the most polarizing figure on the issue.
Senator Carl Levin, at the Capitol on Thursday, aims to keep prosecution of sexual assault cases within the chain of command.
Complex Fight in Senate Over Curbing Military Sex Assaults

By JENNIFER STEINHAUER

The search for legislation is being driven by competition, policy differences and the limits of identity politics in a chamber where women's numbers are increasing.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »
Business
Coal Industry Pins Hopes on Exports as U.S. Market Shrinks

By CLIFFORD KRAUSS

Environmental worries complicate an energy company's plan to mine an Indian tribe's large deposit of coal and ship it to Asia.
Huguette Clark in 1930. Her wills - signed a month apart when she was 98 years old - are the crux of a legal dispute.

Wealth Matters

How to Avoid an Estate Battle After You Die

By PAUL SULLIVAN

Battles over two wills signed by Huguette Clark, the heiress to a copper fortune who died in 2011 at 104, offer lessons even for people who don't have $300 million estates.

Your Money

The Unspoken Stigma of Workplace Flexibility

By TARA SIEGEL BERNARD

Women who take advantage of flexible work schedules may be viewed as not committed to work, but men may be penalized even more.
. Comment Comments
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »
Technology
Steve Case, co-founder of America Online and now chief executive of the investment firm Revolution, spoke about immigration reform outside the White House on Tuesday.

Bits Blog

Tech Pushes to Keep Its Spoils in Immigration Bill

By SOMINI SENGUPTA

The technology industry this week dispatched executives and entrepreneurs to buttonhole lawmakers and rallied people to mount a digital campaign on Congress.

Bits Blog

Facebook Discloses Basic Data on Law-Enforcement Requests

By VINDU GOEL

The social network said it received 9,000 to 10,000 requests for data from American law enforcement authorities in the second half of 2012.
A copy of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court order requiring Verizon to give the government information on landline and mobile telephone calls.
Secret Court Ruling Put Tech Companies in Data Bind

By CLAIRE CAIN MILLER

In 2008, a ruling by a surveillance court said to be against Yahoo discouraged technology firms from fighting data requests from the government.
. Secret Surveillance Court May Reveal Some Secrets
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »
Sports
Keegan Bradley at No. 12, where at least his trouble was of the dry sort. (Others weren't as lucky.) Bradley hit off the dirt path and made bogey.
Only Two Players in U.S. Open Enter Weekend Under Par

By KAREN CROUSE

Of the 156 players who started the United States Open, only Phil Mickelson and Billy Horschel were under par by nightfall, tying for first overall on the leader board.
. U.S. Open: Highlights and Analysis
. Photographs  Slide Show: U.S. Open Replay: Day 2

Angels 5, Yankees 2

Offense Still Absent as Yankees Lose Fourth Straight

By DAVID WALDSTEIN

C. J. Wilson outdid Andy Pettitte, who gave up 4 runs and 11 hits, over seven innings as the Yankees fell to 3-5 on their western swing.
. Interactive Box Score
On Monday, protesters were gathered at Gezi Park.

Analysis

A Precarious Olympic Bid for Istanbul

By CHRISTOPHER CLAREY

The timing of the Istanbul protests could hardly be worse for those who hope the city's fifth bid for the Olympic Games will finally be a winner.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »
Arts
The German pianist Davide Martello put himself and his grand piano at the center of the Taksim Square protest in Istanbul this week, with calming effects.
Music in Istanbul Is Intermission for a Protest

By SEBNEM ARSU

When Davide Martello hauled a grand piano into Taksim Square in Istanbul and started playing, protesters and the police alike shared hours of calm.
A rendering of the planned LG Electronics USA complex on the New Jersey Palisades.
E.P.A. Backs Out of Role in Palisades Project

By ROBIN POGREBIN

In the face of opposition from the Metropolitan Museum of Art and environmentalists, the Environmental Protection Agency has changed its mind about cooperating in the building of a complex for LG Electonics atop the New Jersey Palisades.
Matt Sax, center, in

Theater Review | 'Venice'

Of Shakespeare and Superheroes

By BEN BRANTLEY

There's enough plot in Eric Rosen and Matt Sax's "Venice," the action-flooded new musical at the Public Theater, to fill a whole year in a Marvel comics series.
For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »
N.Y./Region
Paula Pecorella, the managing editor of the student newspaper at West Islip High School, and Nicholas Krauss, the features editor, were prosecuted for trespassing while working on an article on the school's security procedures.
Seeking Exposé, Students End Up in Handcuffs

By AL BAKER

Two journalists from West Islip High School on Long Island set out to examine school security measures, but they were prosecuted for trespassing and their article was quashed.
Matthew Goldstein in 2010. He has been CUNY's chancellor since 1999.
CUNY Leader's Retirement Comes With Paid Sabbatical and Teaching Job

By ARIEL KAMINER

Chancellor Matthew Goldstein will get his full salary during his first year off and for five months of unused sick time, and then he will have a $300,000 job at CUNY.
Pedro Espada Jr. arrived at Brooklyn Federal Court on Friday.
Espada Sentenced to 5 Years for Stealing From Nonprofit

By MOSI SECRET

Pedro Espada Jr., the Bronx politician who was convicted of stealing hundreds of thousands of dollars from a health care network, portrayed himself as a victim.
For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork »
Travel
Looking for Clementine Hunter's Louisiana

By JENNIFER MOSES

Heading north from Baton Rouge, the author goes in search of the world that inspired arguably the state's most beloved artist.
. Video  Video: In Hunter's Footsteps
Abe carries the author's son Bodi up Red Knob Pass in Utah.

Explorer

In Utah, a 100-Mile Trek With a 4-Year-Old Boy

By BRUCE KIRKBY

The author, his young son, two hiking companions and four goats go on a 10-day adventure in the Utah mountains.
Taking the Kids: New York

By PAMELA PAUL

From museums to meals, playgrounds to pit stops, here is some carefully culled advice for covering the city right.
. Photographs  Slide Show
For more travel news, go to NYTimes.com/Travel »
Today's Video
Video Video: Bike Share's Bumps in the Road
A ride from Brooklyn to mid-Manhattan reveals some of the problems with the city's bike share program.
Video Video: The Sweet Spot: The Books of Summer
In this week's video, A. O. Scott, David Carr and others discuss what they will be reading this summer. Have you heard about that book on cheese?
Video Video: Bill Cunningham | Darned if They Do
Men answer the question: wear socks or expose your ankles?
For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »
Editorials

Editorial

After Arming the Rebels, Then What?

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

President Obama should be careful about being dragged into the brutal Syrian war.

Editorial

A Chance to Do Better on Greece

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

The I.M.F. needs to rethink the present, not just the past.

Editorial

The E.P.A. Backs Off on Factory Farms

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

Toxic waste from factory farms is the leading cause of impaired water quality, but the federal government has failed to regulate the industry.
For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »
Op-Ed
Charles M. Blow

Op-Ed Columnist

These Children Are Our Future

By CHARLES M. BLOW

A hypothetical statistical portrait of the high school class of 2013 shows some depressing numbers.
. Columnist Page
Gail Collins

Op-Ed Columnist

The Other Side of the Story

By GAIL COLLINS

The feds have said that surveillance programs have thwarted potential attacks. But is rummaging through little girls' bedrooms really necessary?
. Columnist Page
Joe Nocera

Op-Ed Columnist

This Isn't How to Stop Hacking

By JOE NOCERA

It sure seems as though the American leaker is now the most popular man in China.
. Columnist Page | Blog