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Jun 8, 2013

More expropriation by government likely, former PPT member says: GATA I THE GATA DISPATCH; May 8, 2013.

More expropriation by government likely, former PPT member says

9:45p ET Saturday, June 8, 2013

In the third part of her interview with King World News, Philipa Malmgren, a former presidential assistant and former member of the President's Working Group on Financial Markets -- the Plunge Protection Team -- says governments will be expropriating more of their citizens' assets to avert the bankruptcy of the welfare state. An excerpt is posted at the King World News blog here:

http://kingworldnews.com/kingworldnews/KWN_DailyWeb/Entries/2013/6/8_For...

CHRIS POWELL, Secretary/Treasurer
Gold Anti-Trust Action Committee Inc.

U.S. Helps Allies Trying to Battle Iranian Hackers: The New York Times Global Update; June 8, 2013.

June 8, 2013
Compiled 20:57 GMT

Global Update



TOP NEWS

U.S. Helps Allies Trying to Battle Iranian Hackers

By THOM SHANKER and DAVID E. SANGER
The new effort is the latest example of how the Obama administration is increasingly depending on assuring the defense of computer networks and, if necessary, striking back against assaults.

White House Says Congress Was Briefed 13 Times on Surveillance Programs

By JONATHAN WEISMAN
Lawmakers said that what they knew was vague and broad - and that strict rules of classification prevented them from truly debating the programs or conducting proper oversight.

Tech Companies Concede to Surveillance Program

By CLAIRE CAIN MILLER
Negotiations with the government shed a light on how Internet companies like Facebook and Google interact with the spy agencies that look to their vast trove of information.
World

Video: Turkey Turns to Taksim

Michael Kimmelman examines why Istanbul's Taksim Square evolved into the urban fissure that is growing in Turkish society.
Opinion

Opinion

The Syria the World Forgot

By ALIA MALEK
Sectarian strife is not where the Syrian uprising started, but it is where many players want it to go.
WORLD

Emirates Balk at Activism in Region Hit by Uprisings

By BEN HUBBARD
As part of a broader trend in the region, the United Arab Emirates has moved aggressively to shut down a group that sought political change and a more Islamic government.

U.S.-China Talks Yield Pledge for a New Model of Cooperation

By JACKIE CALMES and STEVEN LEE MYERS
President Obama and President Xi Jinping of China, meeting in California in talks intended to build a rapport, said they had reached important consensus on some main issues.

Syrian Opposition Says It Rejects Talks Unless Rebels Get Arms

By MICHAEL R. GORDON
The proposal to hold talks in Geneva at a point when the Syrian opposition has suffered a bitter reversal has led many in the opposition to question the West's strategy.
BUSINESS

No Tie-Ins. No Touch Screens. No Apps.

By MATT RICHTEL
In a toy industry increasingly turning to high-tech gadgetry and movie tie-ins, the Melissa & Doug company has thrived by sticking to the basics.
Prototype

Invasion of the Beetles, and a Rancher's Revenge

By CLAIRE MARTIN
An abundance of beetle-killed lumber in the West has led creative entrepreneurs to make money by repurposing the wood for technology accessories.

China's Export Growth Slows Amid Concern of Slowdown

By GERRY MULLANY and KEITH BRADSHER
The slowing of export growth comes as concern is rising about the health of China's largest overseas markets and signs of tightening liquidity.
TECHNOLOGY
This Life

The 'I Dos,' Unplugged

By BRUCE FEILER
The hot topic in wedding circles this year? Whether to request, remind or even require that guests go cold turkey on cellphones, cameras and other such technology during the event.
Corner Office

Pound Your Fist if You Must, but Make Me Listen

By ADAM BRYANT
The chief executive of CDI says she tells her team "that I expect them to be very honest, brutally honest with me, but in a respectful way."

Administration Says Mining of Data Is Crucial to Fight Terror

By ERIC SCHMITT, DAVID E. SANGER and CHARLIE SAVAGE
The foiling of a 2009 plot to bomb the New York City subway seemed to be the kind of success President Obama was referring to when he defended "modest encroachments on privacy" to protect the country.
SPORTS

Williams Masters the French Open

By JUDY BATTISTA
Top-ranked Serena Williams won the French Open, 6-4, 6-4, over defending champion Maria Sharapova. The championship is her 16th Grand Slam title.
Sports of The Times

A Feast of Golf History, and Dinner Near the First Tee

By DAVE ANDERSON
The site of the 113th United States Open, Merion Golf Club in suburban Philadelphia, has been the backdrop for some of golf's most indelible moments.

Largely Forgotten Champion, No Longer Dispassionate, Will Return as Host

By KAREN CROUSE
It pains David Graham, especially since he became a heart patient, to acknowledge that for many years, he treated golf as a matter of life or death.
U.S. NEWS

Zimmerman Trial, Opening This Week, Will Raise Complex Questions

By LIZETTE ALVAREZ
The questions are almost unchanged from nearly a year and a half ago, when the fatal shooting of a black teenager by a volunteer neighborhood guardian became a cause célèbre.

Obama Calls Surveillance Programs Legal and Limited

By PETER BAKER and DAVID E. SANGER
President Obama on Friday defended government efforts to gather telephone and Internet data, and sought to reassure Americans that his administration was not listening in on their calls.
Strategies

For Retirees, a Million-Dollar Illusion

By JEFF SOMMER
The topsy-turvy world of the markets - particularly the ultralow yield of bonds - is upending what many people thought they knew about saving for retirement.
OPINION
Op-Ed Columnist

The Spite Club

By PAUL KRUGMAN
When you look closer at why some Republican-led states are choosing to opt out of a piece of ObamaCare, it seems the only explanation for it is sheer spite.
Op-Ed Columnist

The Power Inversion

By DAVID BROOKS
As Washington coughs along in perpetual sclerosis, state and city governments take the stage.

The Chatter for Sunday: The New Yok Times: Alerts FGC BOLSA - FGC FINANCIAL MARKETS; June 9 2013.

ALERTS

FGC BOLSA- FGC FIN

Compiled: June 8, 2013 05:06:17 PM

The Chatter for Sunday, June 9
Notable quotes from business articles that appeared in The New York Times last week.
For more on this topic, go to NYTimes.com »

Administration Says Mining of Data Is Crucial to Fight Terror : The New York Times Today's Headlines; June 08, 2013.

 

Today's Headlines

Saturday, June 8, 2013



Top News
Administration Says Mining of Data Is Crucial to Fight Terror

By ERIC SCHMITT, DAVID E. SANGER and CHARLIE SAVAGE

The foiling of a 2009 plot to bomb the New York City subway seemed to be the kind of success President Obama was referring to when he defended "modest encroachments on privacy" to protect the country.
. News of U.S. Surveillance Draws Anger of Activists and Militants Abroad
. Tech Companies, Bristling, Concede to Federal Surveillance Program
A factory in Germany, where there has been a 5.8 percent gain in employment since 2007.
Many Rival Nations Surge Past the U.S. in Adding New Jobs

By NELSON D. SCHWARTZ

While the United States economy is performing relatively well, the nation has fared worse than six of the nine countries surveyed by the Bureau of Labor Statistics in job gains.
Turkish protesters have concentrated in tent encampments at Istanbul's Gezi Park, on the north end of Taksim Square.

Critic's Notebook

In Istanbul's Heart, Leader's Obsession, Perhaps Achilles' Heel

By MICHAEL KIMMELMAN

Public space, even a modest and chaotic swath of it like Taksim Square, again reveals itself as fundamentally more powerful than social media.
. Photographs Slide Show: Shaping Taksim Square
. Interactive Panorama of District | The Plan to Change Taksim Square
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »

Editors' Picks

U.S.

Video Video: Worship, Austin Style
Sunday services at Vox Veniae, a Protestant church Austin, Tex., feature a six-piece band and volunteer baristas. The 200-member congregation reflects the eclectic city.
. Related Article

OPINION | Op-Ed Contributors

Don't Forsake the Gray Wolf

By JIM DUTCHER, JAMIE DUTCHER and GARRICK DUTCHER

The United States should not relax protections for the vulnerable species.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY

"Nobody is listening to your telephone calls."
PRESIDENT OBAMA, defending government surveillance programs.
ADVERTISEMENT
World
President Xi Jinping of China and President Obama appeared on Friday at Sunnylands, an estate in Rancho Mirage, Calif.
Obama and Xi Tackle Cybersecurity as Talks Begin in California

By JACKIE CALMES and STEVEN LEE MYERS

The leaders planned to discuss issues of security and economics, and President Obama has been urged to bring up human rights.
Splits Appear in Policy 'Troika' Addressing Europe's Financial Crisis

By ANDREW HIGGINS

Throughout the crisis, chiefs at the European Union and the International Monetary Fund have been part of a policy-making triumvirate that also includes the European Central Bank.
Khalid Albaih's political cartoons have inspired protesters across the Arab world. By day, he's a museum employee at the Qatar Museum Authority in Doha.

The Saturday Profile

Cartoonist's Pen Leaves Mark Across Arab World

By ISMA'IL KUSHKUSH

By day, Khalid Albaih works in a museum. After hours, he is a cartoonist with an attitude, inspiring discontented youth across the Arab world.
. Video  Cartoonist in Motion
. Interactive Audio & Drawings: Behind the Art
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »
U.S.
Police officers and sheriff's deputies searched Santa Monica College on Friday. A gunman was killed by the police on the campus.
Shooting Rampage Leaves 5 Dead in California

By IAN LOVETT and ADAM NAGOURNEY

A gunman strode across Santa Monica firing at people, cars, a public bus and buildings before being shot and killed by the police.
. Video The Lede: Video and Images from Shooting
Wynanda Armas said the surveillance was an invasion of privacy.
In U.S., News of Surveillance Effort Is Met With Some Concern but Little Surprise

By ADAM NAGOURNEY

The string of revelations over the past 48 hours about sweeping government surveillance stirred expressions of concern across the country on Friday - along with something of a collective national shrug.
Shannon Guess Richardson, an actress with several small television and film credits, was arrested and charged with mailing a threatening letter to President Obama.
Woman From Texas Is Charged in Ricin Case

By JOSEPH GOLDSTEIN

Shannon Guess Richardson, who accused her husband last week of sending ricin-laced letters to President Obama and other figures, was arrested and charged in the case.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »
Politics
Senator Ron Wyden
Obama Calls Surveillance Programs Legal and Limited

By PETER BAKER and DAVID E. SANGER

President Obama on Friday defended government efforts to gather telephone and Internet data, and sought to reassure Americans that his administration was not listening in on their calls.
. Video  Video Feature: Obama on Surveillance, Then and Now
. A Comparison of Two Secret Surveillance Programs
As Criticism Grows, Curtailing Surveillance Program Seems Unlikely

By JONATHAN WEISMAN

Advocates of Congressional intervention say public pressure from fresh disclosures could revive legislation to at least force more transparency in the government's surveillance programs.
Samantha Power listened as President Obama announced her as his pick to be the next ambassador to the United Nations.
Choice for U.N. Post Gets Israeli Vote of Confidence

By MARK LANDLER

Samantha Power, who is facing some resistance from pro-Israel groups, was praised by the Israeli ambassador to Washington.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »
Business
Chrystral Crawford and 300 others attended the 12th annual Skid Row Career Fair on Thursday at the Los Angeles Mission.
Middling Jobs Numbers Signal a Long Path to Healthy Payrolls

By CATHERINE RAMPELL

American employers added 175,000 jobs in May, which matched the average monthly jobs increase over the last year, while the unemployment rate ticked up to 7.6 percent.
. Jobs Report Pushes Markets Higher
Investors are reassessing how Ben S. Bernanke, the Fed chief, views the economy, and making bets on what they think he sees.
Trying to Divine Intent of Fed, Wall St. Climbs

By NATHANIEL POPPER

Many on Wall Street agreed that the 175,000 jobs created in May could keep the economy on a steady path but would not encourage the Fed to let up on its stimulus sooner than expected.
. Graphic  Graphic: What's on Bernanke's Mind?
Newer chains like Shake Shack have taken business from places like McDonald's and Wendy's.
Restaurant Chains Try to Woo a Younger Generation

By STEPHANIE STROM

Among the millennials, those in the 18- to 30-something age group, there is a greater interest in local foods and a tendency to watch their dollars.
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »
Technology
A Google data center in Council Bluffs, Iowa. Google says it scrutinizes each government request and notifies users if it is allowed.
Tech Companies Concede to Surveillance Program

By CLAIRE CAIN MILLER

The Internet companies that cooperated - at least a bit - with national security officials include Google; Microsoft; Yahoo; Facebook; AOL; Apple; and others.
Lexie Kinder remotely maneuvered her VGo robot down the hallway with her classmates.
A Swiveling Proxy That Will Even Wear a Tutu

By ROBBIE BROWN

Some chronically ill students are attending school virtually with "remote presence robots," which stream two-way video to connect them to the classroom.
. Photographs  Slide Show: Robots in Class

DealBook

Fund Manager Settles Case in Dell Insider Trading Ring

By PETER LATTMAN

Victor Dosti, a portfolio manager at the Whittier Trust Company, is the ninth person to be charged relating to the Dell trade.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »
Sports
Wes Lunt, a college quarterback, had nearly 40 transfer options blocked by his former coach, Mike Gundy of Oklahoma State.
Want to Play at a Different College? O.K., but Not There or There

By GREG BISHOP

The use of transfer rules to eliminate many of an athlete's preferred options illustrates the big-business mind-set of college sports and the control that coaches have over players.
The Spurs stars Tim Duncan, Tony Parker and Manu Ginobili did not crow after their victory in Game 1.

On Basketball

The Spurs' Quiet Class, in Splendid Harmony

By HARVEY ARATON

The fundamentally sound Spurs have too often been dismissed as boring in a culture where commercial appeal has been based on who makes the most noise.
. Off the Dribble: Kidd and Parker and the What-If Game
. Karl Is Out of a Job in Denver and Drawing Interest Elsewhere
Quiet Campaigns Begin for Presidency of I.O.C.

By MARY PILON

Potential successors to Jacques Rogge, the retiring president of the International Olympic Committee, must abide by a process that prohibits promotional campaigns and public debate.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »
Arts
Two members of the protest group Pussy Riot in New York this week. They haven't considered fleeing Russia because
Pussy Riot Takes Manhattan, Quietly

By MELENA RYZIK

Performers in the Russian art and protest collective take in an HBO documentary about them and talk with their fans.
The Neil Simon Theater marquee still announces a show that closed in December.
Need a Theater? Broadway Vacancies Are Up

By PATRICK HEALY

A large number of dark weeks at Broadway theaters have contributed to one of the worst business years in recent memory.
John Oliver Prepares to Host 'The Daily Show'
John Oliver Prepares to Host 'The Daily Show'

By DAVE ITZKOFF

Mr. Oliver talks about preparing for a three-month stint filling in for Jon Stewart and his efforts to book Queen Elizabeth II.
For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »
N.Y./Region
An Invasion of 17-Year-Olds, Loud, Lusty and Six-Legged

By SARAH MASLIN NIR

As cicadas overrun signs, lawns and porches across the region, most homeowners seem resigned to wait out the few weeks of infestation.
The Puerto Rican Day Parade has grown into a star-studded televised extravaganza in the heart of Manhattan.
For Puerto Ricans, a Parade of Questions

By WINNIE HU

Organizers of New York's Puerto Rican Day Parade, which attracts two million spectators, are being scrutinized for how the event is organized and what happens with the money it generates.
The authorities say Andrea Sanderlin of Scarsdale, N.Y., grew marijuana with equipment in this Queens warehouse.
She Rode Horses, Drove an S.U.V. and, the Authorities Say, Farmed Marijuana

By JENNY ANDERSON and ALAN FEUER

Federal authorities say Andrea Sanderlin, 45, raised thousands of marijuana plants with state-of-the-art equipment in a Queens warehouse.
For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork »
Travel
In Cape Breton, a Rugged Golf Getaway

By CHARLES McGRATH

This island on the edge of Nova Scotia isn't known as a golf haven, but for adventurous players, perhaps it should be.
. Video  Video: Golfing in Cape Breton

Overnighter

Finding Solitude at Monet's Gardens

By ALEXANDER LOBRANO

A new hotel has made it easier to avoid crowds at the artist's home and gardens in Giverny, a short trip from Paris.
. Photographs  Slide Show: Dropping In on Monet
The Piazza Cavour fountain in Rimini, scene of a memorable snowball fight in

Footsteps

In Rimini, Looking for Fellini's World

By EVAN RAIL

Though the director Federico Fellini grew up in Rimini, it can take a mix of imagination and persistence to uncover traces of his life and work there.
For more travel news, go to NYTimes.com/Travel »
Today's Video
Video Video: In Performance: Cinderella
The New York Times invited Tony nominees to perform scenes on location. Here, Santino Fontana and Laura Osnes sing a cinematic interpretation of a song from "Rodgers and Hammerstein's Cinderella."
President Obama tried to reassure Americans.
Video Video: Obama Defends Surveillance Programs
President Obama defends and explains a National Security Agency program that monitors domestic and international phone records.
Video Video: This Week's Movies: June 7, 2013
The New York Times critics on "Much Ado About Nothing," "The Internship" and "Wish You Were Here."
For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »
Editorials

Editorial

Congress Can Stop Privacy Abuse

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

Call logs and e-mail should be collected only for those under suspicion of terrorism.

Editorial

The I.M.F. Admits Mistakes. Will Europe?

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

The International Monetary Fund says it was too optimistic about Greece's debt and the effect of spending cuts.

Editorial

Racial Injustice in North Carolina

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

Repealing the state's Racial Justice Act does not erase the irrefutable proof of bias in death penalty prosecutions.
For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »
Op-Ed
Charles M. Blow

Op-Ed Columnist

Of Slippery Slopes

By CHARLES M. BLOW

Government monitoring of the communications of Americans is not a left-right thing. It is a right-wrong thing.
. Columnist Page
Gail Collins

Op-Ed Columnist

Intelligence for Dummies

By GAIL COLLINS

All this news about how the government is keeping the records about our phone calls has raised some serious questions.
. Columnist Page
Joe Nocera

Op-Ed Columnist

How to Monetize Plagiarism

By JOE NOCERA

So Jonah Lehrer has a book deal. This is a column about second chances. Earned or not.
. Columnist Page | Blog