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May 25, 2013

The New York Times Today's Headlines; May 25, 2013.



Today's Headlines

Saturday, May 25, 2013


Top News
Sandy Praeger, left, the insurance commissioner of Kansas, and Kathleen Sebelius, the secretary of health and human services, in 2010. Kansas is one of the states that did not expand Medicaid.
States' Policies on Health Care Exclude Poorest

By ROBERT PEAR

For millions of people below the poverty line, no assistance for health insurance will be available in states that have refused to expand Medicaid.
Workers at a construction site of a residential project in Rizhao, China. Beijing has signaled that, even though the economy is weakening, there is unlikely to be a major government stimulus package this year.
China Plans to Reduce the State's Role in the Economy

By DAVID BARBOZA and CHRIS BUCKLEY

After years of relying on state spending to supercharge growth, China's new prime minister, Li Keqiang, said the government would seek to unleash the nation's creative energies.
For Obama's Global Vision, Daunting Problems

By MARK LANDLER and MARK MAZZETTI

Taking America off "perpetual war footing," as the president proposes to do, will not be a simple task.
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »

Editors' Picks

U.S.

Video Video: Ailing Bridges, Budget Woes
The bridge that collapsed near Seattle is part of a nationwide infrastructure that some say is crumbling beneath us.
. Related Article

OPINION | Op-Ed Contributor

Can a Tree Grow in the Bronx?

By DANIEL L. SQUADRON

A Neighborhood Parks Alliance is one simple way for more New Yorkers to have decent open space, so that every family, in every community, can make a life in the city.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY

"We like to believe in Brazil that we live in a peaceful, happy place, when the truth of our existence is far more complicated. It's like we're Narcissus gazing into a pool of sewage."
MALU FONTES, a newspaper columnist, criticizing a lack of attention paid to rapes of poor women in Rio de Janiero.
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World
A wave of rapes on public transportation in Rio de Janeiro has led to the creation of women-only cars on trains, but some women say not enough is being done.
Public Rapes Outrage Brazil, Testing Ideas of Image and Class

By SIMON ROMERO

A recent wave of rapes in Rio de Janeiro has cast a spotlight on the conflicted attitudes toward women in a country where many hold positions of power.
. Video  Video: Sex Crimes Rise in Rio
Children fleeing from the scene of a bomb attack in Kabul on Friday.
Taliban Attack U.N. Affiliate's Compound in Kabul, Testing Afghan Security Forces

By ROD NORDLAND and SHARIFULLAH SAHAK

The attackers set off a large explosion followed by numerous smaller blasts, sending United Nations and international agency workers into bomb shelters.
President Xi Jinping, right, of China struck a stern tone with an envoy, Vice Marshal Choe Ryong-hae, in Beijing on Friday, arguing that North Korea must work toward denuclearization.
China Bluntly Tells North Korea to Enter Nuclear Talks

By JANE PERLEZ

The Chinese leader, Xi Jinping, struck a stern tone as he called for the denuclearization of the Korean peninsula, according to a state-run Chinese news agency.
. Interactive North Korea's Nuclear Program
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »
U.S.
Lt. Phillip Wise, 52, in Bethany, Okla. With help, he found five people alive in the rubble of a 7-Eleven after the tornado.
To Rescue Survivors, He Pursued the Storm

By MANNY FERNANDEZ

Lt. Phillip Wise of the Bethany Police Department followed the tornado so he could pull survivors from the wreckage in Oklahoma.
. Photographs  Slide Show: 'Oklahomans Don't Stop Fighting'
A 160-foot section of the 58-year-old four-lane steel truss bridge crumpled Thursday evening, apparently after being struck by a truck carrying an oversize load.
Washington State Bridge Collapse Could Echo Far Beyond Interstate

By KIRK JOHNSON

The collapse on Interstate 5 came as politicians had been wrestling over the millions needed to replace another aging bridge over the Columbia River.
. The Lede: Video of Bridge Collapse North of Seattle
. Video  Video: Ailing Bridges, Budget Woes
A day of jubilation at Annapolis included a warning from President Obama about military sexual assaults.
Obama Calls for 'Moral Courage' at Naval Academy Graduation

By MICHAEL D. SHEAR

President Obama on Friday warned that sexual assaults in the military threatened to erode America's faith in the armed forces.
. Video  Video of President Obama's Address
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »
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Politics
Senators Marco Rubio and John McCain last month, two Republicans at odds over how to deal with the federal debt.
Budget Dispute Deepens a Rift Within G.O.P.

By JONATHAN WEISMAN

Republicans are locked in a growing dispute over future budget negotiations, splitting along generational and ideological lines on the party's approach to dealing with the federal debt.
Press Sees Chilling Effect in Justice Dept. Inquiries

By CHRISTINE HAUGHNEY

Despite President Obama's conciliatory gesture of a review of Justice Department investigations involving journalists, some reporters say that chill has already set in.
. Obama, in Nod to Press, Orders Review of Inquiries
Little Debate on Big Issues in Race to Fill Kerry's Seat

By KATHARINE Q. SEELYE

As Election Day nears in Massachusetts, the race between Gabriel Gomez and Representative Edward J. Markey for the Senate seat vacated by John Kerry has focused on lesser issues.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »
Business

Common Sense

Exxon Defies Calls to Add Gays to Anti-Bias Policy

By JAMES B. STEWART

More than 88 percent of Fortune 500 companies have adopted written policies prohibiting bias on the basis of sexual orientation, but Exxon Mobil has refused.
. Video  Video: Exxon Mobil's Stance on Gay Rights
Growth in Options Trading Helps Brokers but Not Small Investors

By NATHANIEL POPPER

Brokerage firms say that options, traditionally used by professional traders, can be profitable for ordinary investors, but this does not square with many investors' experiences.
Workers at Sundance Berry Farms in Watsonville, Calif., are learning ways to enhance food safety, like not wearing jewelry that might fall into boxes of berries.
On the Front Lines of Food Safety

By STEPHANIE STROM and STEVEN GREENHOUSE

Fruit growers, farm workers and a major retailer have started a program aimed at preventing the types of bacterial outbreaks that have sickened consumers who ate contaminated produce.
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »
Technology
Kieran Clifford, a retired vice president for finance from Lucent, took more precautions after a hacker fraudulently requested a large wire transfer from his account.

Wealth Matters

Leaving Behind the Digital Keys to Financial Lives

By PAUL SULLIVAN

As more people do their banking and investing online, the lack of a paper trail poses a problem for business partners, executors and heirs.
F.T.C. Is Said to Begin a New Inquiry on Google

By EDWARD WYATT

People contacted in connection with the case said that regulators were asking questions about Google's bundling of advertising services.
New Computer Attacks Traced to Iran, Officials Say

By NICOLE PERLROTH and DAVID E. SANGER

The recent attacks seem to be aimed at sabotage rather than stealing information, United States officials say.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »
Sports
The Fox announcer Gus Johnson at a pub in London. Overseas, he can work in relative anonymity.
Gus Johnson's Crash Course

By SAM BORDEN

Learning game strategies and player pronunciations, all while dealing with a rabid fan base, posed challenges for Gus Johnson in his first year as a soccer broadcaster for Fox.
Curtis Granderson broke a bone in his pinkie after being hit by a pitch in the fifth, and was replaced for the bottom of the fifth.

Yankees 9, Rays 4

Yankees End Two-Game Skid but Lose Granderson to Injury

By DAVID WALDSTEIN

Curtis Granderson, in his eighth game back from a broken right forearm, sustained a broken bone in his left pinkie when he was hit by a pitch in the fifth.
. Interactive Box Score
Rafael Nadal, seeded third at the French Open and ranked fourth in the world, said,
No. 4 in the World, Nadal Is Still One to Beat at French

By CHRISTOPHER CLAREY

Rafael Nadal, despite a seven-month layoff and the strength of his rivals and the chase pack, is, as usual, the focal point of the French Open.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »
Arts
Thomas Schnalke, director of the Museum of Medical History in Berlin, helped write new guidelines on how to handle human remains like these bones displayed at his institution.
Museums Confront the Skeletons in Their Closets

By DOREEN CARVAJAL

Institutions like the Museum of Medical History in Berlin are responding to increasing claims to return bones and other human artifacts in their collections to indigenous peoples.
A preview of the exhibition
Seeing Art Through Austen's Eyes

By JENNIFER SCHUESSLER

The online exhibit "What Jane Saw" allows viewers to peruse a London gallery as Jane Austen saw it in 1813.
Behind the Candelabra Michael Douglas, left, as Liberace, and Matt Damon as his lover in this film on HBO, Sunday night at 9, Eastern and Pacific times; 8, Central time.

Television Review

Hearts a-Dangle in Spangly Web

By MIKE HALE

Steven Soderbergh's HBO movie "Behind the Candelabra" casts the story of Liberace's years with his lover Scott Thorson as a classic weepie.
For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »
N.Y./Region
Tourists fill the balcony of Canaan Baptist Church of Christ while pews for members go empty.
As Tourists Come and Go, Harlem Churches Lose a 10% Lifeblood

By KIA GREGORY

At the heart of the struggle for the churches is a contradiction: As Harlem's fortunes rise, tithing - the traditional source of the churches' money - is fading away.
D'aja Robinson's mother, Shadia Sands, in sunglasses. The police say D'aja was an unintended victim of a gang shooting; no arrests have been made.
Recalling a Girl, 14, Laughing, Before She Was Shot on a Bus

By KIA GREGORY

Hundreds of mourners at a church in Jamaica, Queens, on Friday remembered D'aja Robinson as an honor roll student with a bright smile who liked to sing and dance.
Students occupying the president's office held an online chat on Wednesday with incoming freshmen.
Tuition Protesters Still in Top Office at Cooper Union

By ARIEL KAMINER

Since May 8, students have used the room to spread word about their rebellion against charging undergraduate tuition, eat catered meals and entertain visits from activists.
For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork »
Travel
A Long, Wet Walk in Wales

By DOMINIQUE BROWNING

Wind, rain, pounding surf and dazzling views on a five-day, less-than-waterproof, head-clearing trek on the Welsh coast.
. Slide Show | Related: Stories From Your Strolls
Dinner at Yengec restaurant on Urla's harbor.

Pursuits

Hunting the Bounty of Turkish Markets

By ROBYN ECKHARDT

A chef's book inspires a spring shopping-cooking-tasting tour of markets and restaurants along Turkey's western coast.
Andrew Wyeth's studio in Chadds Ford, Pa., was opened to the public last summer.

Footsteps

In Pennsylvania, Exploring Wyeth's World

By GERALDINE FABRIKANT

Three sites in Chadds Ford, a small town near Philadelphia, reveal a mix of influences that animated the life and work of the artist Andrew Wyeth.
For more travel news, go to NYTimes.com/Travel »
Today's Video
Video Video: Protecting What's Left After the Tornado
One year ago, Jenevieve Ricketts moved into a newly built home in Moore, Okla. Today, she is left to pick up the pieces.
Video Video: This Week's Movies: May 24, 2013
The New York Times critics on "Before Midnight," "Fill the Void" and "We Steal Secrets: The Story of Wikileaks."
Video Video: Kalimotxo: A 'Poor Man's Sangria'
This Basque-country classic is an easy-to-make twist on sangria, without all the fruit chopping.
For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »
Editorials
Charles M. Blow

Op-Ed Columnist

This Is Not 2009

By CHARLES M. BLOW

The emergence of a new economic picture has dampened the outrage.
. Columnist Page
Gail Collins

Op-Ed Columnist

The Women Versus the Ted

By GAIL COLLINS

The Senate seems a bit less polarized and more productive this session. Is that because there are more women in power or is it thanks to Ted Cruz?
. Columnist Page
Joe Nocera

Op-Ed Columnist

Obama's Gitmo Problem

By JOE NOCERA

It isn't Congress's fault that the prison in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, hasn't closed. It's the president's.
. Columnist Page | Blog
For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »
Op-Ed

Editorial

Deception on Gun Background Checks

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

Many senators who opposed better scrutiny for weapons buyers try to pretend the opposite.
The author's handwritten lyrics for

Opinionator | Measure for Measure

Simple or Impossible

By PAUL WESTERBERG

Writing a song is a little like trying to hit a bottle cap with a wire coat hanger.

Editorial

Strategic Ignorance

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

Republicans are trying to restrict vital information with bills that would curtail and ban surveys by the Census Bureau.
For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »