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Apr 6, 2013

NYT Today's Top Headlines April 6, 2013 | Business: JPMorgan Campaigns to Keep Dimon in 2 Top Jobs

The New York Times

Today's Headlines

Saturday, April 6, 2013


Top News
The emergency contraceptive will now be sold over the counter without age limits.
Judge Strikes Down Age Limits on Morning-After Pill

By PAM BELLUCK

An acidly worded decision raised a broader question about whether a cabinet secretary can decide on a drug's availability for reasons other than its safety and effectiveness.
A job fair in New York in late March for former members of the military.
Hiring in U.S. Tapers Off as Economy Fails to Gain Speed

By CATHERINE RAMPELL

Employers added only 88,000 jobs in March, a pace of growth too sluggish to make a big dent in the backlog of idle workers. The jobless rate dipped to 7.6 percent from 7.7 percent.
. Graphic  Graphic: Missing in Action
. Stocks End Down After Jobs Report
United States Army Patriot missile batteries were placed at an American air base in Osan, south of Seoul. Tension has risen in the region as North Korea continues to make bellicose threats.
Detecting Shift in Beijing, U.S. Makes Its Case on North Korea

By MARK LANDLER

The Obama administration, seeing signs of Chinese frustration toward Pyongyang, is pressing China to crack down or face more of an American military presence in Asia.
. Embassy Warning Joins North Korea Threats
. Comment Post a Comment
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »

Editors' Picks

BUSINESS

Video Video: Drought on the Range
The United States cattle herd is at its lowest level in 60 years, largely because of the drought. Many ranchers are struggling to hang on.
. Related Article

OPINION | Op-Ed Contributor

Interfaith Unions: A Mixed Blessing

By NAOMI SCHAEFER RILEY

Interfaith marriages often come with a heavy price, including marital dissatisfaction and divorce, but they also contribute to religious tolerance.

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World
A gate was closed Friday at a United Nations Relief and Works Agency food center in the Gaza Strip. Protesters opposed the end of a cash aid program.
U.N. Agency Suspends Food Aid in Gaza After Protesters Break Into Its Compound

By JODI RUDOREN

The United Nations Relief and Works Agency in the Gaza Strip stopped food distribution and other services for refugees indefinitely, an official said Friday.
Chinese health workers collected bags of dead chickens that had been slaughtered at the Huhuai wholesale agricultural market in Shanghai on Friday.
China Escalates Its Response to Outbreak of Avian Flu

By ANDREW JACOBS

The government warned people to avoid live poultry and slaughtered more than 20,000 birds at a wholesale market in Shanghai.
Deir al-Zour, like many sites in Syria, has been laid waste by the war, leaving more Syrians fleeing as aid runs low.
U.N. Says It Is Running Out of Money to Assist Wave of Refugees From Syria

By NICK CUMMING-BRUCE and SEBNEM ARSU

A Unicef official says that with 1.25 million Syrians registered as refugees, "the needs are rising exponentially and we are broke."
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »
U.S.
Margaret E. Smith in her one-story home bracketed by crop fields in Slaughter Neck, Del.

This Land

Payment for Act of Kindness: 2 Days in Car Trunk at Age 89

By DAN BARRY

When two girls in Delaware wanted a ride and Margaret E. Smith, 89, obliged, their journey became a frightening encounter along the way.
. More This Land Columns
Patrick Bearup, 36, at the Fourth Avenue Jail in Phoenix, received the death penalty after he was convicted of kidnapping and first-degree murder.
Less Culpable, but With Longer Sentences

By FERNANDA SANTOS

Cases in which a defendant with less involvement in a crime or guilt draws the harshest sentence are not uncommon in Arizona, and elsewhere around the country.
. Documents  Documents: Debating Death Penalties
The funeral of Mike McLelland, district attorney of Kaufman County, and his wife, Cynthia, on Friday in Wortham, Tex. Officials suggested the couple may have known their killer.
Texas Police Seeking Clues to How Killer Got in Home

By MANNY FERNANDEZ and SERGE F. KOVALESKI

The police are looking into the possibility that a Kaufman County district attorney and his wife who were shot dead last Saturday may have known the killer.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »
Politics
There are questions about whether Senator Marco Rubio, Republican of Florida, will ultimately sign onto the bill for a broad overhaul of immigration laws that he has been helping to draft.
Rubio, Amid Planning, Is Yet to Commit on Immigration Bill

By ASHLEY PARKER

Senator Marco Rubio, Republican of Florida, has been part of a bipartisan group drafting legislation in secret since the November election.
Speaker John A. Boehner accused the president of holding
Obama Budget Is Dismissed by G.O.P. and Attacked by Left

By MICHAEL D. SHEAR

Speaker John A. Boehner accused President Obama of holding entitlement programs hostage for tax increases, and some liberals vented their own anger over Mr. Obama's proposal.
. Obama Budget to Include Cuts to Programs in Hopes of Deal
Veterans' Programs Are Set for Raise in Spending Plan

By JAMES DAO

Facing a persistent backlog of disability claims for wounded veterans, and criticism, the Obama administration says its new budget will include significant increases for veterans programs.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »
Business
A vote is planned on whether Jamie Dimon should keep the chief and chairman titles.

DealBook

JPMorgan Campaigns to Keep Dimon in 2 Top Jobs

By SUSANNE CRAIG and JESSICA SILVER-GREENBERG

Board members are making an unusual effort to persuade investors that JPMorgan Chase's chief, Jamie Dimon, should keep his chairman title amid fallout from a trading loss.
. CommentPost a Comment | Read
James B. Stewart

Common Sense

Even After New Highs, the Rally May Last

By JAMES B. STEWART

A study of past returns from the Standard & Poor's 500 suggests that the index's recent highs should not discourage investors.
Sandra McKinnon says she was charged for insurance that she told a clerk she didn't want.

Your Money

A Quick Electronic Signature at the Car Rental Office, and Then Trouble

By TARA SIEGEL BERNARD

Some Dollar Rent a Car customers say they unwittingly signed up for insurance even though they had verbally declined it.
. Comment Post a Comment
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »
Technology
Mark Pincus

Talk

Mark Pincus Thinks Angry Birds Won't Hurt Your Kids

Interview by ANDREW GOLDMAN

The founder of Zynga on games, management and his relationship with Mark Zuckerberg.
All of these apps require thought. Lots and lots of thought. Thinking is what I do all day long. I needed something that would turn my mind off, not on.
Appily Ever After: A Smartphone Shrink

By JUDITH NEWMAN

The author puts five psychology apps to the test to see if they really help her improve her and her family's lives.
The Twitter account for someone who claims to be Cilia Poon appears only to retweet items posted by The Next Web, a technology blog.

Bits Blog

Fake Twitter Followers Becomes Multimillion-Dollar Business

By NICOLE PERLROTH

Despite efforts by Twitter to check for fake accounts, the underground market is becoming more sophisticated.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »
Sports
In the Topham Steeplechase at Aintree Racecourse on Friday, Sam Twiston-Davies, in blue, fell from Little Josh, who broke a shoulder and was euthanized.
Death Again Visits a Racecourse on Trial

By JOHN F. BURNS

The deaths of two horses at the Grand National meeting at Aintree Racecourse have dampened spirits before the main event and reignited concerns over the forbidding fences.
Rutgers Athletic Director Tim Pernetti at a news conference in November to announce that the university would join the Big Ten Conference.
Rutgers Tries to Calm Furor as More Officials Quit

By KATE ZERNIKE and STEVE EDER

The circle of those who saw video of a coach's abusive acts as soon as December was wider than had been understood.
. Documents Investigation Report on Mike Rice
. Pressure Builds on Rutgers President
Paul

Sports of The Times

A Motivational Thread Ties the Junction Boys to Rutgers

By WILLIAM C. RHODEN

It's easy to say Bear Bryant's tactics in 1954 would be universally unaccepted today. Then we see how the Rutgers coach firing played out.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »
Arts
Roger Ebert and Gene Siskel on the set of their TV show.

An Appraisal

Ebert Was a Critic Whose Sting Was Salved by Caring

By A. O. SCOTT

Roger Ebert cared deeply about the human emotions and aspirations that movies represented, and was happy to share those feelings with just about anybody.
The Matisse once owned by the Parisian dealer Paul Rosenberg.
Family Seeks Return of a Matisse Seized by the Nazis

By TOM MASHBERG

The family of the Parisian dealer Paul Rosenberg wants a Norwegian museum to relinquish a 1937 painting that was once held by Goering and was later bought by one of the museum's founders.
Giulio Cesare Natalie Dessay in David McVicar's production of this Handel work at the Met.

Music Review

In Jodhpurs, Hailing Caesar With Seduction

By ANTHONY TOMMASINI

An imaginative "Giulio Cesare" at the Metropolitan Opera casts the Romans as British imperialists and the Egyptians as a motley crew of non-Westerners.
. Photographs  Slide Show
For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »
N.Y./Region
Gov. Dannel Malloy of Connecticut, back turned, embracing the parent of a Newtown shooting victim after signing gun legislation.
In Connecticut, Gun Curbs Had Difficult Path

By PETER APPLEBOME and RAY RIVERA

After the shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School, both parties in the state legislature agreed to find a gun solution together - but the process was fraught from the start.
U.S. Attorney Added Staff to Fight Corruption

By WILLIAM K. RASHBAUM

More prosecutors focused on political corruption and the use of more aggressive tactics may have helped lead to recent arrests 0f lawmakers accused in bribery cases.
A steakhouse put up this poster about the place where the mobster Paul Castellano was killed in December 1985.

Crime Scene

Steak for Two, Please, With a Side of Bribes

By MICHAEL WILSON

What is the going rate for a crooked politician in New York these days? It varies, but it seems to always include the price of a meal at a great steakhouse.
. More Crime Scene Columns
For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork »
Travel
In Austin, Tex., the SXSW Interactive festival.

The Getaway

Business or Pleasure? Try Both.

By STEPHANIE ROSENBLOOM

Conferences like South by Southwest and TED are more than career enhancers. They offer a chance to explore cities, connect with like-minded people and maybe even find love.
Tourists visit Mount Merapi.

Update

Tourism in Java's Land of Ghosts

By ROB DAVIS

The devastated site of a volcanic eruption in Indonesia opens its ruins to visitors, hoping paid tours can help ease recovery.
B'nai Israel in Baltimore.

Personal Journeys

Glimmers of Jewish Glory Days in Baltimore

By JENNIFER MOSES

Inspired by family history and her father's stories, the author goes searching to connect the city's Jewish past with its present.
. Photographs  Slide Show
For more travel news, go to NYTimes.com/Travel »
Today's Video
Video Video: The Sweet Spot | Amateur Pursuits
People do the darndest things. In this week's episode David Carr and A. O. Scott scour The Times's newsroom for moonlighting musicians, dancers and artists.
Video Video: TimesTalks: Roger Ebert
Roger Ebert spoke with The Times's film critic, A. O. Scott.
For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »
Editorials

Editorial

Hunger Strike at Guantánamo

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

The protest is an act of despair by the detainees, and the humane response is to end indefinite detention and close the prison.

Editorial

Progress on Okinawa

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

An agreement to shrink America's military presence could reduce local tensions.

Editorial

A Tax Scandal Adds to French Malaise

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

What happened to those promises of clean government and economic revival?
For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »
Op-Ed
Charles M. Blow

Op-Ed Columnist

The Young are the Restless

By CHARLES M. BLOW

The millennial generation is the generation of change. Advantage Democrats.
. Columnist Page
Gail Collins

Op-Ed Columnist

A New Era in Political Corruption

By GAIL COLLINS

New York's recent corruption scandals shatter our confidence that taking money was the one thing politicians know how to do well.
. Columnist Page
Joe Nocera

Op-Ed Columnist

Why Rutgers Blinked

By JOE NOCERA

The Rutgers incident is just one example of the problems with big-time college sports.
. Columnist Page | Blog
For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »