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Feb 16, 2013

NYT | Global Update February 16 2013.: Cardinals Size Up Potential Candidates for New Pope

The New York Times International Herald Tribune
February 16, 2013
Compiled 21:45 GMT

Global Update

TOP NEWS

Cardinals Size Up Potential Candidates for New Pope

By LAURIE GOODSTEIN
The cardinals who will file into the Sistine Chapel next month to elect a new leader of the Roman Catholic church have been quietly evaluating potential successors for years.

Group of 20 Vows to Let Markets Set Currency Values

By DAVID M. HERSZENHORN
At the end of a conference in Moscow, the group promised: "We will refrain from competitive devaluation. We will not target our exchange rates for competitive purposes."

After Assault From the Heavens, Russians Search for Clues and Count Blessings

By ANDREW E. KRAMER
As the government pursued the scientific mysteries of Friday's exploding meteor, residents reacted to their survival with giddy relief and humor.
World

Interactive Feature: The 117 Men Who Will Choose the Next Pope

Cardinal electors from every region of the world will gather to choose the man to succeed Pope Benedict XVI. See how they add up.
Opinion

Op-Ed Contributor

How Wrestling Lost the Olympics

By JOHN IRVING
Poor leadership allowed the sport's enemies to take it down.
WORLD

Little Hope Amid Push for Afghans on Peace

By ALISSA J. RUBIN and DECLAN WALSH
Diplomats from eight countries are refocusing on forging a deal between the Afghan government and the Taliban before Western troops leave.

Karzai to Forbid Afghan Forces From Requesting Foreign Airstrikes

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Hamid Karzai said he would issue a decree barring the Afghan military from asking international troops to carry out airstrikes under "any circumstances."
BUSINESS

The Slugfest in the Executive Suite

By AMY CHOZICK
Mixed martial arts has become hugely popular - and lucrative - on television. That is leaving media giants locked in a battle over the future of the sport.
Slipstream

If You're Collecting Our Data, You Ought to Protect It

By NATASHA SINGER
How opponents of NASA background checks unwittingly became campaigners for workplace data privacy and security.
Prototype

Cabernet and Jerky, in the Same Sentence

By NICOLE LaPORTE
Jon Sebastiani, in the fourth generation of a Sonoma Valley wine family, sees his new company, Krave Jerky, as a way to change attitudes about a snack food.
TECHNOLOGY
Bits Blog

Facebook Says Hackers Breached Its Computers

By NICOLE PERLROTH and NICK BILTON
The attacks over the past month by sophisticated malware seemed to be similar to those recently directed at Twitter and other companies.

Amazon to Investigate Claims of Worker Intimidation at Distributor in Germany

By MELISSA EDDY
Immigrant workers from across Europe tell of intimidation by guards in neo-Nazi clothing and jackboots, from a subcontractor named H.E.S.S.

Good Fit for Today's Little Screens: Short Stories

By LESLIE KAUFMAN
The short-story collection, often an underappreciated literary cousin of novels, is now enjoying the limelight, thanks to digital media.
SPORTS
Winter Sports Roundup

World Champion at 17, American Wins in Slalom

By BILL PENNINGTON
The American teenager Mikaela Shiffrin became the youngest women's slalom world champion in 39 years on Saturday.

An Admission by Singh Puts PGA Tour on Edge

By KAREN CROUSE
In admitting to the use of deer antler spray, Vijay Singh has unwittingly put the PGA Tour's antidoping program under a magnifying glass.

Livestrong Not Immune From Turmoil Surrounding Its Founder

By MARY PILON and ANDREW W. LEHREN
Lance Armstrong has experienced an extraordinary fall from grace in recent months, and the cancer-fighting foundation he founded has experienced some turbulence.
U.S. NEWS

California Eases Tone as Latinos Make Gains

By JENNIFER MEDINA
As Congress begins debating an overhaul of immigration, many sense that the country is beginning the same evolution California experienced over the last two decades.

Stronger Gun-Control Measures Clear First Votes in the Colorado House

By DAN FROSCH
A state with deep conservative and independent streaks has also been the site of two of the nation's most notorious mass shootings, one in 1999 and one last summer.

Florida Prisoner Who Escaped in Texas Is Killed

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Alberto Morales, a Florida prisoner who escaped in Texas while being transported to Nevada, was killed by law enforcement officers trying to apprehend him.
OPINION
Op-Ed Columnist

Don't Mythologize Christopher Dorner

By CHARLES M. BLOW
He is the wrong emblem for those wronged by the system.
Op-Ed Columnist

Notes From a Gun Buyback

By JOE NOCERA
New Jersey is using "every means necessary to reduce gun violence, traditional and nontraditional." That includes turning guns into bracelets.
Gray Matter

Why We Love Beautiful Things

By LANCE HOSEY
If designers understood more about the mathematics of attraction, the mechanics of affection, all design could both look good and be good for you.

The Economist | Business this week: Highlights of news coverage from Feruary 9th - 15th 2013.

The EconomistBusiness this week


» Barclays laid out a course for its business that tries to put the LIBOR rate-rigging scandal and other fiascos behind it. Antony Jenkins, who took over as chief executive after the resignation of Bob Diamond, pledged that the bank would "help shape the new era for banking" by focusing on stable growth and ethically sound investments. His strategic review also cuts 3,700 jobs, half of them in investment banking, although Barclays remains committed to its wholesale activities. See article».

Broadcast news
Click Here!
» Comcast, one of America's biggest providers of telecoms and cable-television services, said it was buying the 49% stake in NBC Universal it does not already own, for $16.7 billion. It is acquiring the stake from General Electric. The transaction comes amid a flurry of dealmaking in the technology, media and telecoms market, which is seeing its busiest start to a year since the dotcom boom of 2000.
» The two biggest outside investors in Dell warned that they would fight its proposal to go private, arguing that it undervalues the company. The buy-out consortium offered $13.65 a share to shareholders when it presented its deal, but Dell's share price on the stockmarket has since risen above the offer price.
» Apple also faced a potential rift with shareholders when David Einhorn, an activist investor, launched a lawsuit aimed at "unlocking shareholder value". Tim Cook, Apple's boss, denied Mr Einhorn's charge that Apple has a "mentality of the Depression" era about hoarding cash.
» The OECD, a rich-country club, said that greater international co-ordination will be needed to stop multinational companies shifting profits among jurisdictions in order to pay the lowest possible tax rate. In a report the OECD found that the practice is becoming more widespread. Starbucks recently found itself in hot water over its tax affairs in Britain. See article».
» The G7 issued a statement intended to soothe concerns about a "currency war" but ended up causing more confusion than clarity. The statement chided government intervention in currency markets, but also appeared to support an effort by Japan to combat deflation. The yen has weakened markedly against the dollar in response to the new Japanese government's attempt to revive the economy. See article».
» Japan's GDP shrank by 0.4% at an annual rate in the last three months of 2012, the third straight quarter of decline. The economy was weighed down by sagging exports, giving fuel to the government's argument that it needed to take action to tackle the high yen.
» Regulators in America gave the go ahead for CNOOC, a Chinese state-owned oil company, to take over Nexen, which operates mainly in Canada's oil sands but has assets elsewhere, including America's Gulf coast. It was the last big regulatory hurdle for the $15.1 billion deal, the biggest-ever foreign acquisition by a Chinese firm. See article».
» Rio Tinto reported an annual net loss of $3 billion, its first in two decades. This was because of a write-down of its aluminium assets and a project in Mozambique. The mining company's underlying profit was $9.3 billion.

Ready for take-off
» American Airlines and US Airways announced that they were merging, the last of the big American carriers to do so. The deal creates one of the world's biggest airlines.
» Giuseppe Orsi, the boss of Finmeccanica, an Italian defence company, was arrested by police investigating whether bribery was involved in securing a government contract in India to supply helicopters. The bribes were allegedly paid when Mr Orsi headed AgustaWestland, a subsidiary of Finmeccanica.
» PSA Peugeot Citroën reported a €5 billion ($6.4 billion) annual net loss, a record for the company. The French carmaker's sales in the depressed European market slumped by 15% last year. See article».

Alternative energy supply
» General Electric became the world's biggest manufacturer of wind turbines in 2012, according to BTM Consult, which researches green firms. Vestas, a Danish company, had held the top spot since 2000. It has struggled recently, partly because the European push for wind power has been curtailed by the debt crisis. GE, on the other hand, benefited from a gust of activity in America to install turbines ahead of the expiration of a tax break (which was extended).
» Amazon is the most reputable company in America, according to an annual survey conducted by Harris Interactive. The online retailer just pipped Apple to the number-one slot. Walt Disney, Google and Johnson & Johnson completed the top five. The bottom five were AIG, Goldman Sachs, Halliburton, American Airlines and Bank of America.

The Economist | Poitics thia week: Highlights of news coverage from February 9th - 15th 2013.

The EconomistPolitics this week



» Pope Benedict XVI stunned the Catholic church by announcing that he would step down on February 28th, the first papal resignation in 600 years. In a statement read out in Latin, the 85-year-old pontiff said he had decided to leave office because of his age and because "strength of mind and body are necessary" for the job. He conducted his final public mass on Ash Wednesday. The list of favourites to succeed him includes cardinals from Austria, Brazil, Ghana, Italy and the Philippines. See article»
» The economies of Germany and France contracted in the fourth quarter of 2012 as the euro zone moved deeper into recession. Germany's GDP shrank by 0.6%, its worst performance since 2009. The 0.3% contraction in France makes it less likely that it will reach its budget-deficit target this year. See article»
» A meeting of European Union leaders confounded the critics by agreeing on the first real-term cuts in spending since the EU's founding. The deal shaves €34.4 billion ($46 billion) off the budget over the next seven years, a cut of less than 1%. See article»
Click Here!
» France suggested that it wants to give new impetus to Turkey's application to join the EU, and would not block accession talks that have been stalled for three years. Under Nicolas Sarkozy's presidency, France was a stout opponent of Turkish entry. Turkey's eagerness to join has waned since the start of the euro-zone debt crisis.
» A bill that legalises gay marriage in France easily passed the National Assembly. It now heads to the Senate.
» One of the closest allies of Angela Merkel, the German chancellor, stepped down as Germany's education secretary. Annette Schavan had been stripped of her doctoral degree following a plagiarism scandal. The ruckus was a distraction for the ruling Christian Democrats as they focus on an election later this year.
» Italy's former head of intelligence was sentenced to ten years in prison for his part in the 2003 rendition to Egypt of a Muslim cleric, who claims he was tortured. The rendition was conducted under the auspices of the CIA. Italian courts have sentenced 22 CIA agents in absentia.

Nervous neighbours
» North Korea carried out its third test of a nuclear bomb, bringing condemnation from around the world. It said the test was in response to America's "reckless hostility". Barack Obama warned this would only isolate North Korea further. The UN Security Council called it a clear threat to international security. See article»
» In India a Kashmiri militant was hanged after his final plea for clemency was rejected. Afzal Guru was sentenced to death for helping to plot a deadly assault by militants on India's Parliament in 2001. He had been on death row since 2002, but had denied plotting the attack. See article»
» Demonstrations grew in Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh, over a ruling by the country's war-crimes tribunal. A leader of the Jamaat-e-Islami party was convicted of mass murder during the country's 1971 war of independence with Pakistan and was given a life sentence. Many of the protesters want him executed. See article»
» Thailand 's army killed 16 militants who had stormed a base near the border with Malaysia. More than 5,000 people have been killed in Thailand's Muslim-majority south since a separatist campaign reignited in 2004.
» Mohamed Nasheed, a former president of the Maldives, took refuge in the Indian high commission in Male, the capital. He was the first democratically elected president of the archipelago country but left office in February 2012 claiming the threat of a coup had forced him out.

Diplomatic moves
» The Syrian National Coalition announced that Qatar will hand it control of the Syrian embassy in Doha, the capital. The Syrian opposition has already appointed an ambassador. Qatar was one of the first governments to recognise the group as the official representative of the Syrian people.
» The Congress for the Republic, the secular party of Tunisia's president, Moncef Marzouki, said that it would stay in the ruling Islamist-led coalition for another week in the hope that talks aimed at defusing the country's political crisis will succeed.
» Millions of Kenyans watched their country's first presidential debate, broadcast live on 42 local radio and television stations, as well as on YouTube. All eight candidates standing in next month's election took part.

Much depreciated
» Venezuela devalued its currency by 32% against the dollar, in a bid to reduce the fiscal deficit and help exporters. The bolívar has been devalued several times since Hugo Chávez became president in 1999. The official exchange rate still rates the dollar far lower than its price on the black market. See article»
» The Jamaican government said it would restructure its sovereign debt. Jamaica completed one bond swap in 2010, but its debt-to-GDP ratio remains a crushing 140%. Creditors who participate are expected to receive much lower interest rates than they do now.

Among friends (and enemies)
» Barack Obama gave the American president's annual state-of-the-union message to Congress. He laid out a surprisingly full agenda that continued his recent theme of pushing progressive policies, such as proposing to raise the minimum wage to its highest level for 34 years (in real terms). See article»
» Mr Obama also announced that the United States and the European Union would begin talks to create a transatlantic free-trade zone. The idea is not new but has gained support from senior politicians on both sides of the Atlantic in recent months. The talks are expected to last two years.
» The Republicans' official response to Mr Obama's speech was given by Marco Rubio, a Cuban-American senator, underlining the party's warming to immigration reform. However, John Boehner, the Republican Speaker in the House, said a bill needn't be rushed and he would prefer "a little foreplay" first. See article»
» The International Olympic Committee dropped wrestling from its list of core sports for the 2020 games. Wrestling has been on the programme since the first modern games in 1896 and is a popular college sport in America. The IOC grappled with its decision, but says wrestling can reapply as an "additional" sport.

NYT Today's Headlines February 16, 2013.: Shock Wave of Fireball Meteor Rattles Siberia, Injuring 1,200

 
The New York Times
February 16, 2013

Today's Headlines

TOP NEWS

Shock Wave of Fireball Meteor Rattles Siberia, Injuring 1,200

By ELLEN BARRY and ANDREW E. KRAMER
Scenes from a city rocked by a shock wave when a meteor hit the atmosphere offered a glimpse of an apocalyptic scenario that scientists said had never before hurt so many people.

U.S. Faces Fire as It Pulls Out of Afghanistan

By MATTHEW ROSENBERG
As American troops prepare to speed up their withdrawal, it is clear some of it will happen under fire, as Taliban fighters try to strike at departing soldiers.

Rise of Drones in U.S. Drives Efforts to Limit Use by Police

By SOMINI SENGUPTA
Drones are becoming a darling of law enforcement officials across the country. But they have prompted fears of government surveillance, often even before they take to the skies.
QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"It was a light which never happens in life; it happens probably only in the end of the world."
VALENTINA NIKOLAYEVA, a teacher in Chelyabinsk, Russia, describing a meteor.

U.S.

Video: Gun Violence in Chicago

On the streets with the nonprofit group Cure Violence. | An interview with Garry F. McCarthy, Chicago's superintendent of police.
Opinion
Op-Ed Contributor

How Wrestling Lost the Olympics

By JOHN IRVING
Poor leadership allowed the sport's enemies to take it down.
POLITICS

Texas Senator Goes on Attack and Raises Bipartisan Hackles

By JONATHAN WEISMAN
Senator Ted Cruz, Republican of Texas, has quickly made his presence felt with brash moves that have raised the hackles of colleagues from both parties.

Lavish Lifestyle of a Lawmaker Yields Federal Charges

By MICHAEL S. SCHMIDT
Documents said Jesse L. Jackson Jr., the former Illinois congressman, used about $750,000 in campaign funds to buy items like a Michael Jackson fedora.

In His Hometown of Chicago, a Policy Speech by Obama Turns Personal

By JACKIE CALMES
In Chicago on Friday, President Obama will outline an initiative to select 20 communities as laboratories for better coordination of federal, local, nonprofit and private-sector investments.
BUSINESS
DealBook

SAC Clients Said to Seek $1.7 Billion in Refunds

By PETER LATTMAN
The outflows are a blow to the fund founded by Steven A. Cohen, which has one of the best investment track records on Wall Street, but they are expected to have little impact on its business.

Incomes Flat in Recovery, but Not for the 1%

By ANNIE LOWREY
New data show uneven benefits from the economic recovery of 2010-11, with a big rise for the highest earners and little change for others.
Common Sense

The Myth of the Rich Who Flee From Taxes

By JAMES B. STEWART
Despite what low-tax advocates might say, jobs, cost of housing, family ties and climate tend to be stronger reasons for relocation, according to recent academic studies.
EDITORIALS
Editorial

Getting Preschool Education Right

President Obama's proposal for expanding high-quality preschool education, which aims at excellence, deserves a fair hearing.
Editorial

Investors Beware

Riskier investments are growing again, but federal investor protections are fading.
Editorial

Renew the Violence Against Women Act

The reauthorization of the Senate bill provides a refreshing demonstration of bipartisanship that the House would do well to emulate.
ON THIS DAY
On Feb. 16, 1923, the burial chamber of King Tutankhamen's recently unearthed tomb was unsealed in Egypt.

NYT: ALERT FGC BOLSA - FGC FINANCIAL MARKETS February 16, 2013.: In World Trade Data, Signs of a Slowdown

 
The New York Times



Alert Name: FGC BOLSA- FGC FIN
February 16, 2013 Compiled: 12:27 AM

By JACKIE CALMES (NYT)
In Chicago on Friday, President Obama will outline an initiative to select 20 communities as laboratories for better coordination of federal, local, nonprofit and private-sector investments.

By REUTERS (NYT)
The Federal Reserve said manufacturing output declined 0.04 percent in January, but a similar report from the New York Fed indicated the drop-off could be temporary.

By ANNIE LOWREY (NYT)
New data show uneven benefits from the economic recovery of 2010-11, with a big rise for the highest earners and little change for others.

By FLOYD NORRIS (NYT)
China, with an 8 percent gain, posted faster growth in exports than the United States. Canada reported a small gain, but other countries showed declines.