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Jan 26, 2013

GATA | THE GATA DISPATCH (January 26, 2013).

Chris Martenson interviews James Turk about the central bank war against gold

Submitted by cpowell on 05:00PM ET Saturday, January 26, 2013. Section: Daily Dispatches
7:56p ET Saturday, January 26, 2013

Market analyst Chris Martenson today interviews GoldMoney founder and GATA consultant James Turk about gold market manipulation by U.S.-allied central banks, which, Turk says, are losing their war against gold. The interview is about 27 minutes long and is posted as audio at Martenson's Internet site, Peak Prosperity, here:
CHRIS POWELL, Secretary/Treasurer
Gold Anti-Trust Action Committee Inc.

NYT | Global Update (January 26, 2013).: Dozens Die in Egyptian Riots After Soccer Verdict

The New York Times International Herald Tribune
January 26, 2013
Compiled 21:45 GMT

Global Update

TOP NEWS

Dozens Die in Egyptian Riots After Soccer Verdict

By DAVID D. KIRKPATRICK and MAYY EL SHEIKH
The protests came after a Cairo judge sentenced 21 people to death in connection with a soccer riot a year ago in Port Said that killed 74 fans.

French Soldiers Wrest Control of Town in North Mali

By LYDIA POLGREEN
French forces took control of the Islamic rebel stronghold of Gao, winning the biggest prize yet in the battle to retake the northern half of Mali.

Official Says Israel Has Options Short of War to Foil Iran's Nuclear Ambitions

By ISABEL KERSHNER
Israel's departing defense minister said that the Pentagon had prepared blueprints for an operation to set back Iran's nuclear program should the United States decide to attack.
World

Slide Show: Riots Grip Egypt After Soccer Verdict

Dozens died in Port Said during protests after a verdict on a soccer riot, while violence continued to grip Cairo.
Opinion

Op-Ed Contributor

Work With China, Don't Contain It

By JOSEPH S. NYE Jr.
Asia's internal balance of power should be the key to our strategy.
WORLD

Rio's Exploding Manholes Menace Residents and Highlight Aging Infrastructure

By SIMON ROMERO and TAYLOR BARNES
Rio de Janeiro, which will host the 2014 World Cup and the 2016 Summer Olympics, faces criticism for not doing enough to curb the deadly problem.

Former Prime Minister Is Elected President of Czech Republic

By DAN BILEFSKY
Milos Zeman, an economist known for his outspoken populism, was elected president on Saturday, becoming the country's first popularly elected president.

Myanmar's Army Makes Gains in Battle Against Rebels, Observers Say

By THOMAS FULLER
The military was said to have captured a key position near the headquarters of ethnic Kachin rebels, a significant advance in a long and bloody campaign.
BUSINESS

Lincoln's School of Management

By NANCY F. KOEHN
The deliberations over the Emancipation Proclamation built the leadership backbone of Abraham Lincoln, and offer huge lessons for modern executives.

Factory Fire Kills 7 Workers in Bangladesh

By JULFIKAR ALI MANIK and JIM YARDLEY
One of the exits at the small garment factory in Dhaka was locked, forcing some employees to jump out of windows to escape the fire, which occurred just two months after the country's worst factory fire killed 112 workers.
Digital Domain

Mixing, Matching and Charging Less for a Phone Plan

By RANDALL STROSS
Republic Wireless keeps its cellphone service prices low via an interesting hybrid: it uses Wi-Fi when customers are in a Wi-Fi area and a 3G network when they are not.
TECHNOLOGY

Silicon Valley Companies Lobbying Against Europe's Privacy Proposals

By KEVIN J. O'BRIEN
A dispute has brought into the open how much Europe and the United States differ on privacy rights and their role in the digital economy.
DealBook

Compuware Rejects Elliott's $2.3 Billion Bid

By MICHAEL J. DE LA MERCED
The business software maker said that it was focused on its own corporate turnaround blueprint, including cost cuts and a spinoff of a communications products arm.
Bits Blog

Apple Takes Aim at Providers of Under-Age Laborers

By NICK WINGFIELD
Labor recruiters in China last year knowingly provided under-age workers to a supplier that built parts for products from Apple and other companies.
SPORTS

Australian Quest Reaches the Tour

By KAREN CROUSE
At 36, Scott Gardiner is the oldest rookie on the PGA Tour and he is also the first indigenous Australian to earn his full-time playing privileges.
Winter Sports Roundup

Vonn Surprises Maze, Winning Giant Slalom

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
A week after a victory in downhill in Italy, Lindsey Vonn defeated Tina Maze in her rival's best discipline and on her home slopes.

Bedoya Considers the Next Stop in His Soccer Odyssey

By ANDREW KEH
Alejandro Bedoya, a free agent who played recently in Sweden, is in training camp with the United States national soccer team, unsure of where he will next be playing.
U.S. NEWS

A Flood of Suits Fights Coverage of Birth Control

By ETHAN BRONNER
In recent months, federal courts have seen dozens of lawsuits from religious institutions and private employers who say providing birth control to employees would violate their beliefs.

In Fight Over Life, a New Call by Catholics

By LAURIE GOODSTEIN
Some Catholic leaders and theologians are asking why so many of those who call themselves "pro-life" have been silent, or even opposed, when it comes to gun control.

40 Years After Roe v. Wade, Thousands March to Oppose Abortion

By ASHLEY PARKER
The march came two months after the 2012 campaign season, in which social issues like abortion largely took a back seat to the focus on the economy.
OPINION
Patrick Chappatte

Britain May Quit E.U.

But certain other members are quite happy where they are.
From the International Herald Tribune

100, 75, 50 Years Ago

Highlights from the IHT archives.
Op-Ed Contributors

An Afghanistan Write-Off Isn't an Option

By MICHAEL KEATING and MATT WALDMAN
A responsible international approach is the best defense against a repeat of history.