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Jan 20, 2013

BBC News | Business ( 21 January 2013 Last updated at 02:28 GMT).:Girls 'hit hard by world recession' / Dotcom starts new file-sharing site / Treasury needs more 'innovation'




21 January 2013 Last updated at 02:28 GMT

Girls 'hit hard by world recession'Girls attend class at a school in a slum on the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan

A shrinking world economy is painful for many, but girls and women are suffering from the effects of recession

Kim Dotcom smiles during an interview in Auckland in 19 January 2013Dotcom starts new file-sharing site

Megaupload founder Kim Dotcom sets up a new file-sharing website, a successor to the system shut down by New Zealand police last year.

Builders working on a house in KentTreasury needs more 'innovation'

The UK economy will see "sluggish growth" for two years, unless the Treasury and Bank of England adapt a more innovative approach to boosting expansion, a study has said.

NYT | Global Update (January 20, 2013).: Taking the Oath With Little Fanfare, a Day Early

The New York Times International Herald Tribune
January 20, 2013
Compiled 21:45 GMT

Global Update



TOP NEWS

Taking the Oath With Little Fanfare, a Day Early

By JACKIE CALMES and BRIAN KNOWLTON
The quiet ceremony before Monday's public pomp was forced by a quirk of the constitutional calendar but appropriately captured the downsized expectations for President Obama's second term.

Jihadists' Surge in North Africa Reveals Grim Side of Arab Spring

By ROBERT F. WORTH
The assaults in Mali and Algeria have contributed to a sense that North Africa, long a dormant backwater for Al Qaeda, is turning into another zone of dangerous instability.

Israeli Campaign Turned Its Back on Most Pressing Issues

By JODI RUDOREN
A few days before the national elections on Tuesday, voters say issues that have long been staples of Israeli politics have been largely invisible, and pocketbook concerns have been front and center.
U.S.

Video: The Obamas, Part Two

Jodi Kantor examines how the Obamas' first four years in the White House have affected and changed them.
Opinion

Op-Ed Contributors

A 'Plastic Juncture' in World Affairs

By MARTIN INDYK and ROBERT KAGAN
For all the talk of U.S. decline, the president is well-positioned to assert global leadership.
WORLD

Panetta, in His Last Lap as Defense Secretary, Navigates a Crisis

By ELISABETH BUMILLER
A trip to Europe for Leon E. Panetta, the United States' defense secretary, had the feel of a valedictory lap, but the tenor quickly changed with news of abductions in Algeria.

Scars Are an 'Honor' Victim's Sole Testimony

By ALISSA J. RUBIN
Gul Meena survived a brutal attack in Afghanistan three months ago, but she says she cannot recall what led to the moment when, according to the police and neighbors, her brother tried to kill her.

Brotherhood Struggles to Translate Power Into Policy in Egypt

By DAVID D. KIRKPATRICK and MAYY EL SHEIKH
Islamists, winning elections, have unrivaled political power but still appear to exercise little day-to-day authority over the judiciary, the police, the military and the state-run media.
BUSINESS

Buying the N.Y.S.E., in One Shot

By NATHANIEL POPPER
A bold deal by the owner of IntercontinentalExchange to acquire the New York Stock Exchange shows how technology is transforming the world's markets.

Fiscal Footnote: Big Senate Gift to Drug Maker

By ERIC LIPTON and KEVIN SACK
A provision buried in the fiscal bill passed earlier this month gives Amgen, the world's largest biotechnology firm, more time to sell a lucrative kidney dialysis drug without price restraints.

Rift Widens Over Mining of Uranium in Virginia

By TRIP GABRIEL
Bills introduced to the General Assembly would lift a moratorium on uranium mining at a site in southern Virginia, but the issue has divided the region.
TECHNOLOGY
Prototype

A Sister Act, Leaping Into E-Commerce

By NICOLE LaPORTE
Two sisters with experience in the film and toy industries - but not in the fashion or tech fields - started an online company that lets customers design their own shoes.
Corner Office

The First Rule of Brainstorming: Suspend Disbelief

By ADAM BRYANT
Kon Leong, the chief executive of ZL Technologies, an e-mail and file archiving company, says creativity comes from knowing how to reach outside of your own borders.

Digital Daredevil Behind Megaupload Has a New Venture

By JONATHAN HUTCHISON
Kim Dotcom faces charges in the United States of pirating copyrighted material. Exactly a year after his arrest, he introduced a new site that can encrypt and store files.
SPORTS

At the Limit: An Epic to Remember

By CHRISTOPHER CLAREY
Even if he falters in his quest for a third straight Australian Open title, Novak Djokovic will still have another great escape to savor in the years ahead after his marathon victory over Stanislas Wawrinka in the fourth round.

Newcomers Edge Out Old Guard at Heineken Cup

By HUW RICHARDS
In a potentially historic shift, all four rugby quarterfinals will be held by teams who have yet to win the trophy.

Liverpool Finds What It's Been Missing

By ROB HUGHES
Daniel Sturridge scored in Liverpool's 5-0 victory over Norwich, giving the Premier League club the second striker it has desperately needed to play alongside Luis Suárez.
U.S. NEWS

Military Rules Leave Gay Spouses Out in Cold

By RACHEL L. SWARNS
Because same-sex marriages are not recognized by the military, gay service members who are married are barred from receiving benefits accorded to heterosexual married couples.

Medicaid Expansion Is Delicate Maneuver for Arizona's Republican Governor

By FERNANDA SANTOS
Gov. Jan Brewer's decision to support the Medicaid expansion under President Obama's health care law drew fire from conservative groups.

Washington Prepares for Festive but Scaled-Down Version of 2009 Events

By SHERYL GAY STOLBERG
Officials expect 600,000 to 800,000 people to turn out on the National Mall to witness Monday's inauguration, typical for most inaugurations but far short of the 1.8 million who clogged the city in 2009.
OPINION
Op-Ed Contributors

A 'Plastic Juncture' in World Affairs

By MARTIN INDYK and ROBERT KAGAN
For all the talk of U.S. decline, the president is well-positioned to assert global leadership.
Opinion

Managing the Oval Office

By DAVID ROTHKOPF
President Obama would do well to recognize that to lead our country, he must master the day-to-day management of government.
Op-Ed Columnist

Warnings From a Flabby Mouse

By NICHOLAS D. KRISTOF
Studies suggest that endocrine disruptors, chemicals found everywhere from couches to shampoos, may contribute to obesity along with Twinkies and TV.

TWP (January 20,2013).: this week's market outlook videos.

from Trade With Precision - www.tradewithprecision.com


Nick discuss what he expects to happen on stock and currency markets for the week ahead.
After watching the videos, make sure you register for this week's webinar with Steve Ward - Goal Setting For Traders in 2013. This is a timely session not to be missed as you plan ahead for your trading in the new year.

GATA | THE GATA DISPATCH (January 20, 2013).: eff Nielson: Western banking is money for nothing

Jeff Nielson: Western banking is money for nothing

1:40p PT Sunday, January 20, 2013

Jeff Nielson of Bullion Bulls Canada today argues in a brief but incisive essay that the great bulk of the Western investment banking system is little more than parasitism dressed up as expertise. Nielson's commentary is headlined "Western Banking: Money for Nothing -- Literally" and it's posted at Bullion Bulls Canada here:

http://www.bullionbullscanada.com/intl-commentary/26045-western-banking-...

CHRIS POWELL, Secretary/Treasurer
Gold Anti-Trust Action Committee Inc.

GATA | THE GATA DISPATCH (January 20, 2013).: Alasdair Macleod: Gold reserve mysteries


Alasdair Macleod: Gold reserve mysteries

1:30p PT Sunday, January 20, 2013

All the evidence of the Bundesbank's gold repatriation announcement, GoldMoney research director Alasdair Macleod writes today, is that it's just a public-relations exercise to deflect further inquiry into the surreptitious spending of Western central bank gold reserves. Macleod's commentary is headlined "Gold Reserve Mysteries" and it's posted at GoldMoney's Internet site here:

http://www.goldmoney.com/gold-research/alasdair-macleod/gold-reserve-mys...

CHRIS POWELL, Secretary/Treasurer
Gold Anti-Trust Action Committee Inc.

The Economist | Politics this week: Highlights of news coverage January 12th - 18th 2013.

The EconomistPolitics this week



» After rebels tied to al-Qaeda advanced south from their strongholds in the Sahara desert towards Mali's capital, Bamako, France's President François Hollande ordered French troops and aircraft to the area and successfully halted their advance. An African regional force was expected in due course to participate. See article»
» In neighbouring Algeria militant Islamists pounced on a gas plant and seized foreign workers, including American, British and French nationals. One group, with links to the local al-Qaeda outfit, claimed the attack was a reprisal for French intervention in Mali. See article»
» An attack on Aleppo's university in northern Syria was said to have killed at least 87 people; the rebels and President Bashar Assad's government blamed each other. See article»
» South Africa's government threatened Anglo American Platinum with the loss of its mining licence after the firm said it would cut 14,000 jobs.
» Kenyan officials seized more than 600 pieces of ivory in the port of Mombasa before they could be illegally exported. The killing of a family of 11 elephants this month was the single worst incident of poaching recorded in the country.

Good luck
Click Here! » Barack Obama unveiled the most ambitious proposals in America on gun control in 20 years, in light of last month's mass-shooting at a school in Connecticut. The policies are a mix of executive actions and congressional bills which include a ban on assault weapons and stringent background checks. The gun-rights lobby marshalled its supporters. One congressman from Texas said he would start impeachment proceedings against the president if he imposed restrictions. See article»
» California's nonpartisan Legislative Analyst's Office confirmed that the state has "reached a point where its underlying expenditures and revenues are roughly in balance", a sharp turnaround after years of deficits. The LAO was giving its broad approval to the budget put forward by Jerry Brown, the governor.
» The House approved a $51 billion aid package to areas that are still recovering from the aftermath of Sandy, a big storm that pummelled the north-east in October. Most Republicans voted against the bill because, they said, it contained a large proportion of unnecessary spending.

Church versus state
» Hundreds of thousands of protesters took to the streets of Paris over plans to give gay couples the right to marry and adopt children. France's Socialist government wants to change the law soon, but the Catholic church and the conservative opposition argue that this would undermine a building block of society.
» Aslan Usoyan, said to be Russia's top mafia boss and better known as Grandpa Khasan, was shot dead outside a restaurant in Moscow. He had survived two previous assassination attempts.
» The first round of voting in the Czech presidential election produced a surprise when Karel Schwarzenberg, the conservative foreign minister, came in second. He will compete against Milos Zeman, a former prime minister, in a run-off later this month. See article»
» Slovenia's anti-corruption watchdog accused Janez Jansa, the prime minister, of graft, citing €200,000 ($265,000) in private assets which he allegedly failed to declare. Mr Jansa's centre-right coalition partners asked him to resign; he has so far refused to go. See article»
» Alexis Tsipras, Greece's radical left-wing opposition leader, went to Berlin to meet Wolfgang Schäuble, the German finance minister. He presented Mr Schäuble with a list of requests, ranging from debt forgiveness of the kind extended to post-war Germany to recognition of war debts claimed by Greece when it was under Nazi occupation. See article»

He has his supporters

» A Muslim cleric, Tahir ul Qadri, burst onto the political scene in Pakistan by leading the biggest march on Islamabad, the capital, in recent memory. The moderate Sufi called for a corrupt political class to be swept away; he may have the support of the army, zealous to protect its privileges. To add to the strange swirlings, the Supreme Court ordered the arrest of the prime minister, Raja Pervez Ashraf, over scandals during his time in office as the water and power minister. See article»
» Meanwhile, protests were held in Quetta, a city in western Pakistan, against a rise in sectarian violence aimed at ethnic Hazara Shias. The bombing of a snooker hall on January 10th killed 86 people there. See article»
» A Pakistani became the fifth soldier killed this year near the line of control separating Indian and Pakistan positions in disputed Kashmir. Two of the five soldiers killed were Indian. After India's prime minister, Manmohan Singh, issued an unusually stern warning to Pakistan, the two countries agreed to "de-escalate" tensions.
» Japan's new prime minister, Shinzo Abe, unveiled a ¥10.3 trillion ($116 billion) stimulus package, which adds to Japan's huge pile of debt but which Mr Abe insisted would lift the country out of recession. He also increased political pressure on the Bank of Japan, again calling on it to banish deflation and "take responsibility for the real economy".
» Measures of air pollution in China's capital, Beijing, went from "hazardous" to beyond measurement. Much of the country lay shrouded in smog. Ordinary Chinese and even the state media have been unusually critical of the government's inadequate measures to deal with filthy air. See article»

Sitting in the boss's chair
» Nicolás Maduro showed that he is Venezuela's acting president in all but name. On behalf of Hugo Chávez, he gave a state-of-the-nation speech to the National Assembly and appointed a new foreign minister, Elías Jaua. Mr Maduro said Mr Chávez, who remains out of sight in Cuba after a cancer operation five weeks ago, was feeling a bit stronger.
» Talks between Colombia's government and the FARC guerrillas resumed in Havana after a Christmas break. The negotiators are still discussing agrarian reform, the first of five agenda items; both sides said they wanted the talks to move more quickly.
» In Cuba hundreds of people queued to apply for passports as a law abolishing exit visas took effect. Meanwhile, the government said there had been 50 cases of cholera in a district of Havana, but that the outbreak was under control.

GATA | THE GATA DISPATCH (January 20, 2013).

Signs of shortage of investment silver, CMI's Haynes tells King World News

10a PT Sunday, January 20, 2013

Bill Haynes of CMI Gold & Silver today tells King World News about signs that a shortage of investment silver is developing. An excerpt from the interview is posted at the King World News blog here:

http://kingworldnews.com/kingworldnews/KWN_DailyWeb/Entries/2013/1/19_As...

CHRIS POWELL, Secretary/Treasurer
Gold Anti-Trust Action Committee Inc.

NYT | Breaking News (January 20, 2013).: President Obama Sworn In for a Second Term, in a Quiet Ceremony

The New York Times | BREAKING NEWS ALERT
BREAKING NEWS Sunday, January 20, 2013 12:29 PM EST
President Obama was quietly sworn into office for a second term just before noon in a brief and intimate ceremony, ahead of Monday’s far showier public inaugural celebrations.
The ceremony, which lasted less than two minutes, satisfied the Constitutional requirement that the president’s swearing-in take place by noon on the Jan. 20 after an election.
The oath was administered by Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. in the White House Blue Room, an elegant, gilded space with a sweeping view of the South Lawn. Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. was sworn in earlier in the day.

READ MORE »

http://www.nytimes.com?emc=na
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NYT | Today's Headlines (January 20, 2013).: Hostages Dead in Bloody Climax to Siege in Algeria

The New York Times
January 20, 2013

Today's Headlines



TOP NEWS

Hostages Dead in Bloody Climax to Siege in Algeria

By ADAM NOSSITER
The Algerian Army conducted a last assault on a gas field that militants had seized, killing most of the kidnappers left, and raising the total of hostages dead to at least 23, Algerian officials said.

Change Comes: After 4 Years, Friends See Shifts in the Obamas

By JODI KANTOR
Those who know the Obamas say they can see an accumulation of small shifts in the president and the first lady since they walked the inaugural parade route four years ago.

Fiscal Footnote: Big Senate Gift to Drug Maker

By ERIC LIPTON and KEVIN SACK
A provision buried in the fiscal bill passed earlier this month gives Amgen, the world's largest biotechnology firm, more time to sell a lucrative kidney dialysis drug without price restraints.
QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"I was sad; then I was angry. The military still treats us as second-class citizens."
COL. HEATHER MACK, whose wife was offered only a "special guest membership" in a club for officers' spouses at Fort Bragg.

N.Y. / Region

Video: The Secrets of Grand Central

In his new book "Grand Central: How a Train Station Transformed America," Sam Roberts of The Times goes behind the scenes at Grand Central Terminal ahead of the centennial.
Opinion
Opinion

Managing the Oval Office

President Obama would do well to recognize that to lead our country, he must master the day-to-day management of government.
POLITICS

Washington Prepares for Festive but Scaled-Down Version of 2009 Events

By SHERYL GAY STOLBERG
Officials expect 600,000 to 800,000 people to turn out on the National Mall to witness Monday's inauguration, typical for most inaugurations but far short of the 1.8 million who clogged the city in 2009.

A White House Aware of Second-Term Perils

By PETER BAKER
President Obama and his advisers are developing a strategy intended to avoid the pitfalls of his predecessors with a robust agenda focused on the economy, gun control, immigration and energy.
Sidebar

For President and Chief Justice, Another Chance to Get It Right

By ADAM LIPTAK
The combination of Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. and President Obama creates a version of a physics problem: How can such smooth personalities create so much friction?
BUSINESS
Strategies

The Guns Hiding in Your Portfolio

By JEFF SOMMER
Whatever their position on gun control, many investors own shares of firearms makers at least indirectly, through their mutual and exchange-traded funds.
Fair Game

How to Cut Megabanks Down to Size

By GRETCHEN MORGENSON
Chopping the biggest banks into pieces would better protect the nation's taxpayers, says the president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
The Boss

Giving Children a Chance

By JEAN S. DESRAVINES
The chief executive of New Leaders Inc., a group that recruits and develops leaders to turn around low-performing public schools, describes his own journey in the education field.
EDITORIALS
Editorial

The Immigration Saga Continues

A big, bipartisan deal for reform in divided Washington? Here's hoping.
Editorial

Lessons From the London Whale

JPMorgan's detailed report of its $6 billion loss last year highlights unfinished reforms.
Editorial

'Where Is the Taking?'

A Florida court's ruling on property rights on environmentally sensitive land should be upheld by the Supreme Court.
SUNDAY REVIEW
News Analysis

The French Way of War

By STEVEN ERLANGER
The French, as evidenced by their intervention in Mali, take pride in their military capacity and in their independence of action.
News Analysis

So Long, Lance. Next, 21st-Century Doping.

By DAVID EWING DUNCAN
Advances in bio-enhancers and technology could make steroids seem quaint.
ON THIS DAY
On Jan. 20, 1981, Iran released 52 Americans held hostage for 444 days, minutes after the presidency had passed from Jimmy Carter to Ronald Reagan.