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Dec 14, 2012

President Obama on the Shooting in Connecticut: From The White House (December 14, 2012):

The White House Friday, December 14, 2012
President Obama on the Shooting in Connecticut

This afternoon, President Obama made a statement from the Briefing Room on the shooting at an elementary school in Newtown, Connecticut.

Watch the President's statement on the shooting in Connecticut.

Watch President Obama's statement on the shooting in ConnecticutPresident Obama's Remarks

Read President Obama's full remarks:

This afternoon, I spoke with Governor Malloy and FBI Director Mueller. I offered Governor Malloy my condolences on behalf of the nation, and made it clear he will have every single resource that he needs to investigate this heinous crime, care for the victims, counsel their families.

We've endured too many of these tragedies in the past few years. And each time I learn the news I react not as a President, but as anybody else would -- as a parent. And that was especially true today. I know there's not a parent in America who doesn't feel the same overwhelming grief that I do.

The majority of those who died today were children -- beautiful little kids between the ages of 5 and 10 years old. They had their entire lives ahead of them -- birthdays, graduations, weddings, kids of their own. Among the fallen were also teachers -- men and women who devoted their lives to helping our children fulfill their dreams.

So our hearts are broken today -- for the parents and grandparents, sisters and brothers of these little children, and for the families of the adults who were lost. Our hearts are broken for the parents of the survivors as well, for as blessed as they are to have their children home tonight, they know that their children's innocence has been torn away from them too early, and there are no words that will ease their pain.

As a country, we have been through this too many times. Whether it's an elementary school in Newtown, or a shopping mall in Oregon, or a temple in Wisconsin, or a movie theater in Aurora, or a street corner in Chicago -- these neighborhoods are our neighborhoods, and these children are our children. And we're going to have to come together and take meaningful action to prevent more tragedies like this, regardless of the politics.

This evening, Michelle and I will do what I know every parent in America will do, which is hug our children a little tighter and we'll tell them that we love them, and we'll remind each other how deeply we love one another. But there are families in Connecticut who cannot do that tonight. And they need all of us right now. In the hard days to come, that community needs us to be at our best as Americans. And I will do everything in my power as President to help.

Because while nothing can fill the space of a lost child or loved one, all of us can extend a hand to those in need -- to remind them that we are there for them, that we are praying for them, that the love they felt for those they lost endures not just in their memories but also in ours.

May God bless the memory of the victims and, in the words of Scripture, heal the brokenhearted and bind up their wounds.

The President also issued a proclamation honoring the victims of the tragedy, ordering U.S. flags to be flown at half-staff until sunset on December 18.

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NYT | Politics (December 14, 2012).: Obama Responds to Connecticut School Shooting

 
The New York Times

December 14, 2012

Politics

 
 
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NYT | Global Update (December 14, 2012).: Hard-Line Israeli Foreign Minister Is Stepping Down

The New York Times International Herald Tribune
December 14, 2012
Compiled 21:52 GMT

Global Update

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DealkBook P.M. Edition (December 14, 2012).: Week in Review: Rate-Rigging Scandal Keeps Growing



Friday, December 14, 2012
TOP STORY
Week in Review: Rate-Rigging Scandal Keeps Growing The rate inquiry escalated. | Chinese companies shopped abroad. | The Deal Professor called for the S.E.C. to re-examine old regulations. | DealBook's special section examined business between worlds. | HSBC agreed to pay nearly $2 billion to settle charges over laundering. | Mongolia's investment prospects dimmed. | The U.S. Treasury sold its A.I.G. shares. | Amgen said it would buy a firm working on gene links to diseases.

A look back on our reporting of the past week's highs and lows in finance.
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A rainstorm approaches Mongolia's Oyu Tolgoi mine, which is being developed by the mining giant Rio Tinto.
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  • DEALBOOK »
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  • DEALBOOK HIGHLIGHTS
    Best Buy Gives Founder More Time to Make a Bid The beleaguered electronics retailer says it will give its founder, Richard Schulze, until Feb. 28 to make a takeover bid for the company, giving him a chance to look at holiday sales numbers.
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    Discovery Strikes 2 Deals in Bid for International Growth Discovery Communications struck two deals on Friday aimed at expanding its reach in Europe, including by buying the Nordic arm of the German broadcaster ProSiebenSat.1.
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    DealBook Video
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