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Oct 6, 2012

The New York Times Special Report -October 6,2012-: Citing U.S. Fears, Arab Allies Limit Syrian Rebel Aid

Breaking News
The New York Times
Saturday, October 6, 2012
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Citing U.S. Fears, Arab Allies Limit Syrian Rebel Aid

In an exclusive report in Sunday’s New York Times, Robert F. Worth writes that Saudi Arabia and Qatar have been funneling money and small arms to Syrian rebels for months but that they have not provided heavier weapons, like shoulder-fired missiles, that could allow opposition fighters to bring down government aircraft, take out armored vehicles and turn the war’s tide.

The countries have held back, officials in both nations said, in part because they have been discouraged by the United States, which fears the heavier weapons could end up in the hands of terrorists. As a result, the rebels have just enough weapons to maintain a stalemate, and the war grinds on. Providing rebels with heavier weapons “has to happen,” Khalid al-Attiyah, a state minister for foreign affairs in Qatar, said. “But first we need the backing of the United States, and preferably the U.N.”

Read More:
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/07/world/middleeast/citing-us-fears-arab-allies-limit-aid-to-syrian-rebels.html?emc=na

The New York Times Global Update -October 6, 2012-.

The New York Times International Herald Tribune
October 6, 2012

Global Update



TOP NEWS
News Analysis

Europe's Richer Regions Want Out

By STEVEN ERLANGER
The euro zone crisis has accelerated calls for independence from the richer regions of member countries, angry at having to finance their poorer neighbors.

Turkey Fires Back at Syria a Fourth Day in a Row

By ANNE BARNARD and HWAIDA SAAD
A large armored contingent of Syria's elite Republican Guard stormed a western Damascus suburb near the presidential palace on Friday, residents and antigovernment activists said.

Extradited Muslim Cleric and 4 Other Terrorism Suspects Appear in American Courts

By EMILY S. RUEB
Abu Hamza al-Masri and two other men appeared in Federal District Court in Manhattan, and two others faced a judge in New Haven on Saturday after being extradited from Britain.
Travel

Video: Touring Tolkien in New Zealand

With the first of three Hobbit movies about to be released, New Zealand is preparing for the next wave of J.R.R. Tolkien fans.
Opinion

Op-Ed Contributor

How Hugo Chávez Became Irrelevant

By FRANCISCO TORO
Venezuela remains mired in authoritarian radicalism. The rest of Latin America, led by Brazil, has moved on.
WORLD

Slow-Burning Challenge to Chile on Easter Island

By SIMON ROMERO
Inspired by other parts of Polynesia that have obtained political autonomy or are seeking independence, leaders of the Rapanui people are mounting a rebellion against Chile.

Political Islam and the Fate of Two Libyan Brothers

By DAVID D. KIRKPATRICK
One brother, after 16 years in Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi's prisons, is a lawmaker. The other became Al Qaeda's No. 2 and was killed in an American drone strike in Pakistan.

Rebels Say West's Inaction Is Pushing Syrians to Extremism

By C. J. CHIVERS
Leaders of Syria's rebellion say that by sitting on the sidelines, the West risks losing a potential ally in the Middle East if President Bashar al-Assad's government falls.
BUSINESS

A Master of Improv, Writing Twitter's Script

By NICK BILTON
A comic's heart beats inside Dick Costolo, the nonconforming chief executive of Twitter who may well hold the key to the company's success.

They Work Long Hours, but What About Results?

By ROBERT C. POZEN
Often, professionals are judged by the amount of time they spend at the office. But that gauge can be at odds with workplace efficiency.
Unboxed

The Seeds That Federal Money Can Plant

By STEVE LOHR
At a time of looming budget cuts, advocates of government financing of technology research argue that it is an investment in the nation's future.
TECHNOLOGY
Design

Who Made That Escape Key?

By PAGAN KENNEDY
The button that stands between machine and master.

Foxconn Denies Report of Unrest at iPhone Factory

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
State media and an overseas labor watch group said some workers halted production lines, apparently over higher quality control standards.
SPORTS

With N.H.L. Arenas Silent, an Overseas League Welcomes Stars and Buzz

By ANDREW ROTH
The lockout has been a boon for the Russia-based Kontinental Hockey League, as Alex Ovechkin, Evgeni Malkin and others have returned to their hometown clubs.

Forced to Choose in Soccer: Club or Community

By HARVEY ARATON
Players at U.S. Soccer-affiliated academies are no longer permitted to play for their high school teams, forcing them into profound choices that can be complicated - and costly - for their families.

Celtics Lose in Turkey

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Boston Celtics lost the first game of the N.B.A.'s preseason, 97-91, in Istanbul to the Turkish team Fenerbahce Ulker.
U.S. NEWS

Scientists Adopt Tiny Island as a Warming Bellwether

By STACEY SOLIE
A married team of scientists, their mentor and a rotating cadre of graduate students have been observing disturbing declines in wildlife on the tiny island of Tatoosh in Washington State.

Voters in Florida Are Set to Weigh in on Two Contentious Ballot Questions

By LIZETTE ALVAREZ
Among 11 proposed amendments to the Florida Constitution, No. 6 would ban state money for abortions, and No. 8 would remove language barring religious institutions from receiving state money.

Emory Confronts a Legacy of Bias Against Jews

By SAMUEL G. FREEDMAN
The evidence of bias against Jewish students in Emory University's dental school has long been known, but until now the university had neither admitted the bias nor apologized for it.
OPINION
Op-Ed Columnist

Jobs Report: Cooked or Correct?

By JOE NOCERA
The latest government employment report, a month from Election Day, created quite a stir.
Op-Ed Columnist

Of Hooters, Zombies and Senators

By GAIL COLLINS
This is truly an election year to remember. Aside from Barack Obama and Mitt Romney, attention must be paid to the races for U.S. Senate.

The New York Times: Alert FGC BOLSA FGC FINANCIAL MARKETS -October 6th, 2012-.




Alert Name: FGC BOLSA- FGC FIN
October 6, 2012 Compiled: 12:28 AM

Unemployment fell to 7.8 percent from 8.1 percent, reaching its lowest level since President Obama took office and crossing what had become a symbolic threshold in the campaign.

Total consumer borrowing was up in August, and combined with the decrease in unemployment, it served as a double dose of economic good news.

Strong equity gains after the government reported an unexpected drop in the unemployment rate dwindled as the day went on.

New York Times Global Update - October 6, 2012-.

The New York Times International Herald Tribune
October 6, 2012
Compiled 04:22 GMT

Global Update



TOP NEWS

Drop in Jobless Figure Gives Jolt to Race for President

By SHAILA DEWAN and MARK LANDLER
Unemployment fell to 7.8 percent from 8.1 percent, reaching its lowest level since President Obama took office and crossing what had become a symbolic threshold in the campaign.

Fears Persist Among Venezuelan Voters Ahead of Election

By WILLIAM NEUMAN
Many Venezuelans are anxious about casting ballots against President Hugo Chávez because of a widespread belief that the government retaliates against dissenters.

British Judges Approve Extradition of Muslim Cleric to U.S. on Terrorism Charges

By SARAH LYALL and ALAN COWELL
A Muslim preacher, Abu Hamza al-Masri, lost an appeal Friday against extradition to the United States.
Fashion & Style

Video: Bill Cunningham | Game Change

The press buildup at the recent spring collections in Paris for the first ready-to-wear shows by the new designers Raf Simons (for Dior) and Hedi Slimane (for Saint Laurent) was far-fetched.
Opinion

Op-Ed Contributor

How Hugo Chávez Became Irrelevant

By FRANCISCO TORO
Venezuela remains mired in authoritarian radicalism. The rest of Latin America, led by Brazil, has moved on.
WORLD
The Saturday Profile

Catalan Leader Boldly Grasps a Separatist Lever

By RAPHAEL MINDER
Artur Mas, Catalonia's leader, says he is serious about letting Catalans decide whether to secede, and this posturing has thrust him to the forefront of Spanish politics.

German Catholic Church Links Tax to the Sacraments

By MELISSA EDDY
The court had ruled that Catholics are free to leave the church, thus avoiding a tax that is collected by the government.

Rebels Say West's Inaction Is Pushing Syrians to Extremism

By C. J. CHIVERS
Leaders of Syria's rebellion say that by sitting on the sidelines, the West risks losing a potential ally in the Middle East if President Bashar al-Assad's government falls.
BUSINESS
Economix

Taming Volatile Data for Jobs Reports

By CATHERINE RAMPELL
The reasons for sharp swings in employment data are statistical, not political.

Defiant Message Amid Iran Currency Crisis

By RICK GLADSTONE
At Friday Prayer, clerics accused the United States of leading an economic war against Iran, and asserted that the currency crisis would ease.

As Its Economy Sags, India Asks a Critic to Come Home and Help Out

By VIKAS BAJAJ
Raghuram G. Rajan's calls for widespread and speedy changes to the nation's economy are being heard by his boss, Prime Minister Manmohan Singh.
TECHNOLOGY
Common Sense

The Shadow of Steve Jobs in Apple's Maps Push

By JAMES B. STEWART
The company's bundling of its mapping technology with the iPhone 5 brings to mind the Microsoft-Netscape antitrust battles of the 1990s.

Worries Over Defense Department Money for 'Hackerspaces'

By AMY O'LEARY
The financing has prompted criticism that the military's money could co-opt workshops where hackers gather to build, invent or take apart things in their spare time.

Samsung Expected to Reach End of Record Run

By REUTERS
Samsung Electronics reported a record quarterly profit but may have to set money aside this quarter related to a United States court verdict that awarded more than $1 billion in damages to Apple.
SPORTS

A Winning Pauper in the Sport of Kings

By GINA RARICK
In horse racing, although the rich guys usually win, every now and then fate smiles on the little guy, as it has done with Jean-Pierre Gauvin and his colt Saonois, a favorite in the Prix de l'Arc de Triomphe.

Soccer-Crazy Brazil Opening Its Arms to Rugby

By EMMA STONEY
In Brazil, soccer is a religion and its stars, like Pelé and Ronaldo, are revered as gods. But rugby is the second-fastest-growing sport there, behind mixed martial arts.

With N.H.L. Arenas Silent, an Overseas League Welcomes Stars and Buzz

By ANDREW ROTH
The lockout has been a boon for the Russia-based Kontinental Hockey League, as Alex Ovechkin, Evgeni Malkin and others have returned to their hometown clubs.
U.S. NEWS

Romney Claims of Bipartisanship as Governor Face Challenge

By MICHAEL WINES
Mitt Romney's record as governor that he mentioned in the first debate looks considerably less burnished than he suggested.

Accident Suspected in Agent's Death on Mexican Border

By MICHAEL S. SCHMIDT
Federal authorities said there were "strong preliminary indications" that a Border Patrol agent who was killed on Tuesday was shot by another agent.

No Appetite for Good-for-You School Lunches

By VIVIAN YEE
Students get more fruits and vegetables under new nutritional requirements for public school lunches, but many children just toss them away.
OPINION
Op-Ed Contributor

Words to Soothe Asia's Tensions

By YAN LIANKE
The bonds of Sino-Japanese culture must be used to calm the outbursts that inflame territorial disputes.
Op-Ed Contributor

To Moscow With News

By MEG BORTIN
When the first issue of the daily Moscow Times came out on Oct. 2, 1992, no one could have imagined the impact the paper would have.
Latitude

In the Eyes of the Beholden

By JONATHAN BLITZER
The economic crisis has put Spain center stage in the Continent-wide drama, but Spaniards are feeling cut out of their own story.

Wall Street at Close Report | MarketWatch -October 5, 2012-.

By Kate Gibson, MarketWatch 
 
NEW YORK (MarketWatch) — U.S. stocks finished mixed Friday, but posted weekly gains, as enthusiasm over a drop in the U.S. unemployment rate gave way to caution ahead of the beginning of the quarterly earnings season. 

The S&P 500 SPX -0.03%  closed nearly unchanged, slipping 0.47 point to 1,460.93, though the index rose 1.4% for the week. 

The Dow Jones Industrial Average DJIA +0.26%  climbed 34.79 points, or 0.3%, to end at 13,610.15, its highest closing value since December 2007. The blue-chip index posted a weekly gain of 1.3%.
Stocks had rallied during the session after data showed the economy added 114,000 jobs in September, and the unemployment rate fell to 7.8%, its lowest level since January 2009. See: Jobless rate falls to 7.8%, lowest since 2009 
 
“It’s a continuation of what we’ve been seeing: modest growth but nothing spectacular. But we’re not moving back into recession,” Brad Sorensen, director of market and sector research at the Schwab Center for Financial Research, said of the September jobs report. 

‘I’m not going to buy into any political conspiracy theories.”
Brad Sorensen, Schwab Center for Financial Research

In late trade, however, stocks turned mostly lower as investors eyed the start of third-quarter earnings season on Tuesday when aluminum giant Alcoa Inc. AA +0.22%  will report results. See: Investors brace for worst earnings since recession rebound. 
 
Friday’s session echoes a pattern in play in recent weeks that has Wall Street “making a decisive move up or down in the morning, go sideways and then retrace half the move before the close,” said Arthur Hogan, a strategist at Lazard Capital Markets. 

“We’re in wait-and-see mode. We’re waiting to see what happens with the election, we’re waiting to see what happens with the fiscal cliff, and we’re waiting to see what happens with Europe,” Hogan said. 

Next week the market will get “company-specific announcements that could be indicative of broader economic trends,” Matthew Kaufler, portfolio manager at Federated Investors, said of third-quarter earnings season.
“The expectations bar is as low as it’s been this entire cycle (since 2009). Even though corporate America continues to find a way to eke out profits out of slowing top-line revenue growth, it’ll be uninspiring at best,” offered Hogan of the results ahead.
Advancers outpaced decliners by 17 to 13 on the New York Stock Exchange, where around 600 million shares traded. Composite volume topped 3.1 billion.
The Nasdaq Composite COMP -0.42%  fell 13.27 points, or 0.4%, to end at 3,136.19; the index gained 0.6% for the week.
Shares of iPhone maker Apple Inc. AAPL -2.13%  dropped 2.1%, weighing on the Nasdaq. See: Why Apple shares fell.
Zynga Inc. ZNGA -11.90%  shares dropped nearly 12% after the game maker cut its 2012 outlook, with Facebook Inc. FB -4.73%  , which gets a portion of its revenues from Zynga fees, also hit. Shares of Facebook fell 4.7%. See: Zynga in a pinch as Facebook gaming


Week ahead: Alcoa, J.P. Morgan Alcoa kicks off the third-quarter earnings season with its results on Tuesday. J.P. Morgan and Wells Fargo are due to report earnings next Friday. 

The U.S. dollar held steady as Treasury notes fell, while oil prices declined for a third week.
Equities had added to weekly gains after the Labor Department report, which included an upward revision to the August number and bolstered optimism for increased consumer spending ahead of the holiday shopping season. Details of the monthly data showed averaged hourly earnings rising by 0.3%, a gain that Sorensen found particularly hopeful. See commentary: The jobs report President Obama has been waiting for.
“Heading into the holiday season, people are earning a little more money. After a flat month, that’s a little encouraging,” Sorensen said.
Kaufler at Federated Investors said: “Psychologically to see it [the jobless rate] finally get below 8% is helpful at the margin to confidence.”
“This keeps the Fed’s bias towards easing in place, because the Fed has emphasized full employment as a primary goal of its policies, so it reinforces [Federal Reserve Chairman Ben] Bernanke’s perspective that he needs to keep rates at low levels until employment moves down more meaningfully,” said Kaufler.
In a Twitter posting, former General Electric Co. GE +0.74%  Chief Executive Officer Jack Welch accused the White House of manipulating the employment report for political gain. See 10 reactions to Jack Welch's jobs conspiracy tweet.
“As you approach an election, there’s going to be that going on, but if you look at the trend, it’s really in line with what we’ve seen, so I’m not going to buy into any political conspiracy theories,” said Sorensen at Schwab. 

Kate Gibson is a reporter for MarketWatch, based in New York.

DealBook | DealB%K Afternoon Edition -October 5, 2012-. Wall Street Regulator Ramps Up Enforcement



Friday, October 5, 2012
TOP STORY
Wall Street Regulator Ramps Up Enforcement The Commodity Futures Trading Commission, once considered a toothless regulator, brought a record number of enforcement cases over the past year, as fines soared.
  • DEALBOOK »
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    DEALBOOK HIGHLIGHTS
    An assembly line in Freemont, Calif., for Tesla's Model S, a high-performance electric sedan.
    News Analysis: Cash Flows Are Critical for Tesla Mitt Romney recently referred to electric-car maker Tesla Motors as a loser. Yet as it ramps up sales of its sleek electric sedan, Tesla may end up a winner. Tracking its cash flows is one way to handicap its chances.
    After Multibillion-Dollar Loss, JPMorgan Continues to Revamp Two senior executives at JPMorgan Chase, Irene Tse and Barry Zubrow, are expected to leave by the end of the year, in the latest round of management reshuffling after the bank's multibillion-dollar trading loss.
    Week in Review: Private Equity Firms Counting Their Cash Buyout firms in Europe are hustling for cash. | A cellphone deal is turning up the heat on Sprint. | Campaign ads are focusing on ties to Wall Street, no matter how thin. | Andrew Ross Sorkin said the private equity world had more money than it knew what to do with. A look back on our reporting of the past week's highs and lows in finance.
    Buzz Tracker
    Evercore Hires a Restructuring Specialist From Lazard Evercore Partners said on Friday that it had hired Stephen Goldstein, a restructuring and bankruptcy specialist, from Lazard. Mr. Goldstein, who will become a senior managing director, previously worked on the reorganizations of the Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Company, iStar Financial and Charter Communications.
    Morgan Stanley's Chief Sticks by Debt Trading Despite prolonged troubles with fixed-income trading, Morgan Stanley has no plans to withdraw from the business, according to the firm's chief executive, James Gorman. "I don't think it's an option and I don't think it's wise," he told The Financial Times in an interview, saying that it will stay in more "flow" parts of debt trading. "We actually have some convictions, we still take a lot of risk, we have an $800 billion balance sheet," he added.
     
  • DEALBOOK HIGHLIGHTS
    An assembly line in Freemont, Calif., for Tesla's Model S, a high-performance electric sedan.
    News Analysis: Cash Flows Are Critical for Tesla Mitt Romney recently referred to electric-car maker Tesla Motors as a loser. Yet as it ramps up sales of its sleek electric sedan, Tesla may end up a winner. Tracking its cash flows is one way to handicap its chances.
    After Multibillion-Dollar Loss, JPMorgan Continues to Revamp Two senior executives at JPMorgan Chase, Irene Tse and Barry Zubrow, are expected to leave by the end of the year, in the latest round of management reshuffling after the bank's multibillion-dollar trading loss.
    Week in Review: Private Equity Firms Counting Their Cash Buyout firms in Europe are hustling for cash. | A cellphone deal is turning up the heat on Sprint. | Campaign ads are focusing on ties to Wall Street, no matter how thin. | Andrew Ross Sorkin said the private equity world had more money than it knew what to do with. A look back on our reporting of the past week's highs and lows in finance.
    Buzz Tracker
    Evercore Hires a Restructuring Specialist From Lazard Evercore Partners said on Friday that it had hired Stephen Goldstein, a restructuring and bankruptcy specialist, from Lazard. Mr. Goldstein, who will become a senior managing director, previously worked on the reorganizations of the Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Company, iStar Financial and Charter Communications.
    Morgan Stanley's Chief Sticks by Debt Trading Despite prolonged troubles with fixed-income trading, Morgan Stanley has no plans to withdraw from the business, according to the firm's chief executive, James Gorman. "I don't think it's an option and I don't think it's wise," he told The Financial Times in an interview, saying that it will stay in more "flow" parts of debt trading. "We actually have some convictions, we still take a lot of risk, we have an $800 billion balance sheet," he added.
    DealBook Video
    Business Day Live: Jobless Rate Falls to 7.8%, Lowest Since January 2009
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