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Aug 11, 2012

NYT Global Update | World: After Sinai Attack, U.S. and Egypt Step Up Talks on Security

The New York Times International Herald Tribune
August 11, 2012
Compiled 20:53 GMT

Global Update



TOP NEWS

Romney Chooses Ryan, Pushing Fiscal Issues to the Forefront

By JEFF ZELENY and JIM RUTENBERG
Mitt Romney introduced Representative Paul D. Ryan of Wisconsin as his running mate Saturday in Norfolk, Va., making a selection that will intensify the campaign debate on the size and role of government.
News Analysis

Embracing Ryan, and His Budget Details

By JACKIE CALMES
To date, Mitt Romney has been criticized for a lack of detail in his plan to reduce the nation's debt. Tapping the architect of the House Republican budget plan changes that.

U.S. and Turkey to Tighten Coordination on Syria

By DAMIEN CAVE
Turkey and the United States agreed to form a task force with intelligence, military and political leaders from both countries to track events in Syria and plan for its future.
Sports

Interactive Feature: The World Records That Fell

See the records that fell at the London Olympics and explore the history of the records in each event.
Opinion

Latitude

Phys Ed, China's Losing Game

By CLARISSA SEBAG-MONTEFIORE
The Chinese government's tactical funding of minority sports for a few discourages team sports for all.
WORLD

After Sinai Attack, U.S. and Egypt Step Up Talks on Security

By STEVEN LEE MYERS and THOM SHANKER
Concerned about a security vacuum in the Sinai region, officials in the United States and Egypt are discussing American aid that would include equipment, training and surveillance.

U.S. Accuses Hezbollah of Aiding Syria's Crackdown

By RICK GLADSTONE and ANNE BARNARD
The United States said the Lebanese militant group Hezbollah has trained and advised government forces inside Syria and has helped to expel opposition fighters from within the country.

Wed and Tortured at 13, Afghan Girl Finds Rare Justice

By GRAHAM BOWLEY
A decision to uphold prison sentences for three of Sahar Gul's in-laws is still an exception to the prevailing treatment of women in Afghanistan.
BUSINESS

In Olympic Park, a Deluge From Our Sponsors

By DAVID SEGAL
Commercial messages are generally shunned at the main site of the London Games. But pavilions erected by corporate sponsors are loud exceptions.
Corner Office | Bill Flemming

Before the Meeting Adjourns, Tell Me What You'll Do Next

By ADAM BRYANT
Bill Flemming, president of Skanska USA Building, likes to conclude a meeting by asking participants how they will act upon the decisions it produced.
Unboxed

How Big Data Became So Big

By STEVE LOHR
Judging from its many turns in the spotlight this year, the term "Big Data" has entered the mainstream.
TECHNOLOGY
Noted

Stronger, Faster, Nastier

By BEE-SHYUAN CHANG
Will the London Olympics one day be remembered as a cesspool of social media negativity?
Cultural Studies

Parting Is Such Sweet Revenge

By AIMEE LEE BALL
Whether the leave-taking is voluntary or pink-slipped, anyone with a Facebook page, Twitter account or Tumblr feed can issue a very public kiss-off to a former boss or company.

Letting Companies Settle While Denying Guilt Reconsidered by F.T.C.

By EDWARD WYATT
The Federal Trade Commission said it would review a rule after one commissioner wrote a blistering dissent to a settlement with Facebook.
SPORTS

Bolt's Last Run in London Results in 3rd Gold and World Record

By KAREN CROUSE
Appearing in what could be the final race of his Olympic career, Usain Bolt anchored Jamaica's sprint relay to a new world record of 36.84 seconds.

Brazil Defeats U.S. for Gold in Women's Volleyball

By JULIET MACUR
For the second Olympics in a row, Brazil beat the United States and celebrated a victory that has eluded the American women since volleyball became an Olympic sport in 1964.

Fortnight of No Stiff Upper Lip

By CAMPBELL ROBERTSON
The British public has reveled in the success of the home country's athletes and the smooth operation of the London Games.
U.S. NEWS
FiveThirtyEight

A Risky Rationale Behind Romney's Choice

By NATE SILVER
When a prudent candidate like Mitt Romney picks someone like Paul Ryan as his running mate, it suggests that he felt he held a losing position against President Obama.

Redirecting Fresh Water Raises Fears for Farmers

By NORIMITSU ONISHI
Prime farmland in the Sacramento River's delta would be affected in the diversion of fresh water to the state's more economically vital areas.

Ambiguity in Health Law Could Make Family Coverage Too Costly for Many

By ROBERT PEAR
Rules proposed by the I.R.S. could leave millions of people in the lower middle class uninsured and frustrate the intent of Congress, which was to expand coverage.
OPINION
Op-Ed Contributor

Exploring the Planets Enriches Us at Home

By MICHAEL BENSON
A fruitful spillover of innovation has cascaded forth from NASA ever since the Apollo program.
Op-Ed Columnist

Obama's Europe Pivot

By JOHN VINOCUR
A funny thing has happened to Barack Obama out there on the campaign trail. The president of the Pacific pivot looks remarkably interested in Europe.
Latitude

Phys Ed, China's Losing Game

By CLARISSA SEBAG-MONTEFIORE
The Chinese government's tactical funding of minority sports for a few discourages team sports for all.

London Metal Group on Rare Earth Metals

The videos below that  you will watch, are a very valuable information of the prestigious London Metals Group on Rare Earth Metals, that was sent me  through  its Senior Associate Tom Atkinson, whom I thank sincerely for his  courtesy . Please judge for yourself .. and do not miss the chance to see them.

               Fernando Guzmán Cavero

Rare earth elements - BBC Why we depend on them and China's dominance of the Market Trade fears grow over China's dominance on the rare earth market 13072012 LondonMetalGroup 1280x720 The rare earth metal dysprosium is escalating in value according to Jack Lifton

If you require more information please contact: 
Tom Atkinson
Senior Associate
London Metal Group
Direct: 0203 455 9107
Level 33, 25 Canada Sq, London, E14 5LQ

NYT Today's Headlines August 11, 2012 |

The New York Times
August 11, 2012

Today's Headlines



TOP NEWS
The Caucus

Romney to Announce Running Mate on Saturday

By JEFF ZELENY and MICHAEL BARBARO
Mitt Romney is scheduled to announce his vice presidential candidate in Norfolk, Va., aboard the U.S.S. Wisconsin, and several signs were pointing toward Representative Paul Ryan of Wisconsin.

U.S. Accuses Hezbollah of Aiding Syria's Crackdown

By RICK GLADSTONE and ANNE BARNARD
The United States said the Lebanese militant group Hezbollah has trained and advised government forces inside Syria and has helped to expel opposition fighters from within the country.

City Acts Quickly Amid Sharp Rise in Homelessness

By AARON EDWARDS
Responding to a surge in the homeless population, New York City has rapidly opened nine shelters in the last two months, and local officials say they were blindsided.
QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"Hate and the killer were not successful. He wanted to divide and we have come together."
PRABHJOT SINGH, co-founder of the Sikh Coalition, at a memorial service for six worshipers slain at a Sikh temple in Oak Creek, Wis.

U.S.

Election 2012 App

Get the latest news and analysis of Mitt Romney's vice-presidential decision.
Opinion
Op-Ed Contributor

Water Damage

Why do so few black children know how to swim?
WORLD

Blackmail Cited as Motive in a Killing That Shook China

By EDWARD WONG and ANDREW JACOBS
Gu Kailai, the wife of an ambitious Chinese leader, plotted to protect her son from demands for money by the Briton she is accused of killing, according to reports of the prosecutors' case.
The Saturday Profile

The British Lawmaker Nipping at Tabloids' Heels

By AMY CHOZICK
For years Tom Watson has led the push to investigate Britain's freewheeling tabloids, especially Rupert Murdoch's papers, and now the scrutiny is yielding prosecutions.

After Sinai Killings, Cairo Tightens Grip on a Neglected Region

By KAREEM FAHIM
The northern Sinai Peninsula has seen a buildup of troops and military hardware since a fatal attack Sunday on Egyptian soldiers who were about to break their Ramadan fast.
U.S.

Drought Forces Reductions in U.S. Crop Forecasts

By RON NIXON and ANNIE LOWREY
The United States slashed its estimate of the annual corn crop by 15.5 percent, to its lowest level since 1995, with the cost of processed food, animal feed and ethanol likely to rise.

The Nun Who Broke Into the Nuclear Sanctum

By WILLIAM J. BROAD
Sister Megan Rice, 82, one of three people arrested in a break-in at a nuclear complex, is a peace activist with a privileged background and a long list of arrests.

Thousands Gather to Mourn Six Dead in Shooting at Temple

By STEVEN YACCINO
People from around the world attended a group memorial service and wake at a school in Oak Creek, Wis., for Sikh worshipers who were killed on Sunday.
POLITICS

Stiff Challenge for Thompson in Senate Race

By MONICA DAVEY
One of Wisconsin's best-known politicians, Tommy G. Thompson, finds himself in a four-way struggle for the Republican nomination in a changed political landscape.

New Focus for Romney on Connecting and Closing the Empathy Gap

By JEFF ZELENY
Mitt Romney's biggest challenge at the moment is not President Obama. It's himself. He begins a four-state bus tour on Saturday to try to strengthen his relationship with voters.

Campaign Steps Up Its Attacks on Negative Ads by a Pro-Obama 'Super PAC'

By MICHAEL D. SHEAR and TRIP GABRIEL
Mitt Romney's campaign sought to take advantage of a backlash against negative campaigning by President Obama's allies. But new national polls showing Obama's lead widening suggest the ads may be working.
BUSINESS
Common Sense

In Superrich, Clues to What Might Be in Romney's Returns

By JAMES B. STEWART
Based on experts' analysis of data on the wealthiest taxpayers, Mitt Romney has almost certainly been paying income taxes, but perhaps at a very low rate.

Standard Chartered Case Casts a Chill Over Banks

By JESSICA SILVER-GREENBERG
Global banks are worried that their New York operations could make them public targets for processing transactions already deemed legal by federal regulators, federal authorities said.

In Grocery Stores, the Perimeters Take Center Stage

By STEPHANIE STROM
As sales droop in the staid center aisles full of shelf-stable products, grocers are focusing on more glamorous areas like the deli, bakery and produce sections.
TECHNOLOGY
Noted

Stronger, Faster, Nastier

By BEE-SHYUAN CHANG
Will the London Olympics one day be remembered as a cesspool of social media negativity?
Cultural Studies

Parting Is Such Sweet Revenge

By AIMEE LEE BALL
Whether the leave-taking is voluntary or pink-slipped, anyone with a Facebook page, Twitter account or Tumblr feed can issue a very public kiss-off to a former boss or company.

Letting Companies Settle While Denying Guilt Reconsidered by F.T.C.

By EDWARD WYATT
The Federal Trade Commission said it would review a rule after one commissioner wrote a blistering dissent to a settlement with Facebook.
SPORTS

Clean Passes and a Sparkling Finish

By SAM BORDEN
The Americans won their first gold medal in the sprint relay in 16 years. Their time, 40.82 seconds, broke the previous mark, 41.37, which was set by East Germany in 1985.

For Pentathletes, All Business on the First Date

By CAMPBELL ROBERTSON and SARAH LYALL
For competitors who have trained vigorously, luck of the draw plays a surprisingly large role in the middle of the pentathlon when it comes time to ride a horse they have just met.
Yankees 10, Blue Jays 4

Yankees Use Blue Jays to Continue Turnaround

By DAVID WALDSTEIN
The Yankees, who had been floundering and just finished a hard-fought series against Detroit, beat the last-place Blue Jays for their third win in a row.
ARTS
Critic's Notebook

The Olympics, 'Columbo' Style

By NEIL GENZLINGER
For those viewers still trying to see NBC's Olympics evening coverage without knowing the results in advance, a modest suggestion.
Watch List

A Guide Who Talks to Statues and Trees

By MIKE HALE
The Web series "Up to Speed," on Hulu, follows Timothy Levitch as a tour guide.

Painting Bryant Park, While Adding to Its Charm

By LISA W. FODERARO
The corporation that operates the oasis behind the New York Public Library's main branch hired four artists in residence this summer to paint scenes of park life.
NEW YORK / REGION

As Easy as ... Look Ahead! Turn! Oh, No!

By MATT FLEGENHEIMER
After childhood false starts, adolescent indifference and a lengthy effort to conceal the deficiency as an adult, the time had come for a transportation reporter to learn how to ride a bike.

Ex-CNN Anchor Joins Debate vs. Unions Over Teacher Misconduct

By AL BAKER
Campbell Brown has become a vocal participant in the debate over the role of unions in disciplinary actions against teachers accused of sexual misconduct.

Court Asked to Nullify Convictions in '95 Killing

By BENJAMIN WEISER
Evidence recently discovered by an investigator for prosecutors suggests that different people were responsible for murdering a livery-cab driver seventen years ago in the Bronx.
TRAVEL

The Other Siberian Railroad

By FINN-OLAF JONES
Deep into its eastbound charge across Russia, the Trans-Siberian Railway sprouts an artery known as the BAM - a remote railroad with its own curious, complex story to tell.
Journeys

South Africa Adds Beer to the Wine List

By SANDRA MacGREGOR
In a country known for its wines, microbreweries are surging, with the number of independent beer makers set to nearly double over the next year or so.
Heads Up

In London, a Taste of America

By KATIE PARLA
A look at three restaurants that are infusing their offerings with flavors from across the Atlantic.
EDITORIALS
Editorial

President Morsi's First Crisis

The attack in the Sinai Peninsula has forced an inexperienced leader to confront competing interests to bring the situation under control.
Editorial

Down Payment on a Dream

A promising new program will shield young immigrants from deportation and free them to seek jobs.
Editorial

Politics, Intolerance and Fair Courts

An upcoming judicial election brings out the worst in Iowa's Republican Party.
OP-ED
Op-Ed Columnist

Wrong-Track Romney

By CHARLES M. BLOW
Current polls don't look so good for the Republican presidential candidate. While they may not be predictive, they reveal some high hurdles in Mitt Romney's path.
Op-Ed Columnist

Become a Star Tracker

By GAIL COLLINS
Ever think of going into politics without having to run for office? Nothing is really happening, after all, unless the opposition has it on tape!
Op-Ed Columnist

Down With Shareholder Value

By JOE NOCERA
How a company's stock price became the be-all-end-all in the modern-day corporate culture.
ON THIS DAY
On Aug. 11, 1965, deadly rioting and looting broke out in the predominantly black Watts section of Los Angeles.