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Aug 5, 2012

CBS NEWS Advance of interview with Jordan's King Abdullah II: Clock ticking on Syrian political transition,

The hundreds of Syrian refugees fleeing across the border into Jordan are putting pressure on the country, which is calling for international aid. Charlie Rose sat down with Jordan's King Abdullah II who feels if there isn't a political transition in Syria by the end of the year, there will be a "full-out civil war." See the full interview on "CBS This Morning."

CBS NEWS | Selected Video : Authorities calling Wis. Sikh temple shooting "domestic terrorism"

Sun Aug 05 16:30:57 PDT 2012 Chief John Edwards of the Oak Creek police department details how authorities are working with the FBI by handling the deadly shooting at a Sikh temple as a case of domestic terrorism and how local law enforcement "stopped a tragic event that could have been a lot worse."

NYT Global Update | Top News - August 5, 2012: Guilty Plea Expected in Tucson Shooting Rampage.

The New York Times International Herald Tribune
August 5, 2012

Global Update

 
TOP NEWS

Guilty Plea Expected in Tucson Shooting Rampage

By STEVEN LEE MYERS and MICHAEL S. SCHMIDT
Jared L. Loughner was reported ready to admit to killing 6 people and wounding 13, including Representative Gabrielle Giffords of Arizona.

Suicide Bomber Kills Dozens in Yemen

By REUTERS
At least 20 people were killed and 20 more were wounded after a bomber blew himself up at a gathering organized by a former sympathizer of Al Qaeda, the Yemeni Defense Ministry said on its Web site.

Mars Mission's Fate Rests on Landing

By KENNETH CHANG
The rover Curiosity will end its eight-and-a-half-month journey from Earth on Sunday, after a series of computer-controlled maneuvers that NASA scientists can only watch.
Sports

Slide Show: Murray's Golden Moment

Andy Murray beat Roger Federer in straight sets to win gold in men's singles. Murray has yet to win a Grand Slam singles title, but winning gold in his own country surely qualifies as a major victory.
Opinion

Opinion

Israel's Fading Democracy

By AVRAHAM BURG
Human rights once united Israel with America. But in today's discourse, the tone has radically changed.
WORLD

Israel Bars Foreign Envoys From Traveling to West Bank Meeting

By JODI RUDOREN
Delegations from five countries were denied permission to use Israeli border crossings because their governments do not recognize the state of Israel, a decision that angered the Palestinians.

Syrian Rebels Say Hostages Are Iranian Guards

By DAMIEN CAVE and HWAIDA SAAD
As fighting continued throughout Syria, the rebels insisted that their captives were members of Iran's elite Revolutionary Guards, not religious pilgrims.

As Syria War Roils, Unrest Among Sects Hits Turkey

By JEFFREY GETTLEMAN
With Syria's war devolving into a bloody sectarian showdown, tensions have increased across the border between Turkey's Alawite minority and its Sunni Muslim majority.
BUSINESS

Greece Faces Further Reviews Before Release of Aid

By NIKI KITSANTONIS
The troika of international lenders plans to return to Athens in early September for a final review of the government's finances before agreeing to disburse loan installments.
The iEconomy

In Pursuit of Nissan, a Jobs Lesson for the Tech Industry?

By BILL VLASIC, HIROKO TABUCHI and CHARLES DUHIGG
Executives have long said America can't compete in building electronic devices. But the migration of carmaking from Japan is a case study in the most unlikely of transformations.

Marcus Samuelsson, a Chef, a Brand and Then Some

By ADRIENNE CARTER
The question for Marcus Samuelsson, the chef, restaurateur, author, food impresario and media personality, is how far and how fast he can expand his personal brand.
TECHNOLOGY
Digital Domain

Letting the Cloud Watch Over the Farm

By RANDALL STROSS
Cloud computing and other Internet services are coming to agriculture, allowing farmers to keep better track of their crops, livestock and expenses.

Tribe Revives Language on Verge of Extinction

By KIRK JOHNSON
An American Indian language once relegated to near extinction now has an online dictionary.
App City

Tricks to Finding Food and to Paying for It

By JOSHUA BRUSTEIN
New applications can help diners locate a meal, and make sure that certain someone pays what he owes.
SPORTS

This Time, Murray Topples Federer, to Delight of Home Crowd

By CHRISTOPHER CLAREY
Andy Murray was unstoppable against Roger Federer in the gold-medal match in men's singles, winning, 6-2, 6-1, 6-4, in only 1 hour 56 minutes.

Pistorius Fails to Make Final

By SAM BORDEN
Oscar Pistorius, the double-amputee runner from South Africa, was eliminated in the semifinals of the men's 400-meter at the London Olympics.

Maroney Stumbles on Way to Silver in Vault

By JULIET MACUR
The American McKayla Maroney, the overwhelming favorite to win a gold medal on vault, ended up with the silver medal after falling on her second vault.
U.S. NEWS

At Least 6 Dead in Shooting at Sikh Temple in Wisconsin

By MICHAEL SCHWIRTZ
At least one gunman opened fire at a temple in Oak Creek, a town just south of Milwaukee, police said. The gunman was shot and is believed to have died. The police said they were still uncertain whether there were other gunmen.

Fairs, Like Crops, Are Drooping With the Heat

By MONICA DAVEY
At county and state fairs across corn country this year, the most widespread drought since the 1950s is evident, as the hot summer has seeped into even the cheeriest, oldest tradition.

Plan to Speed Travel With Toll Road in Maine Hits a Nerve

By KATHARINE Q. SEELYE
The idea of an east-west highway has been kicking around for decades. But a proposed private road has a good chance of becoming reality, and opponents say it would ruin the state.
OPINION
Op-Ed Columnist

The Love Goddess Who Keeps Right on Seducing

By MAUREEN DOWD
Some like it hot, lush and vulnerable. Why the luminous Marilyn continues to glow.
Op-Ed Columnist

Mr. Negative vs. Mr. Complacent

By ROSS DOUTHAT
The Obama campaign slashes and burns, while the Romney campaign stays generic.
Op-Ed Columnist

Truculence Before Truth

By FRANK BRUNI
Harry Reid's unsubstantiated charge that Mitt Romney paid no taxes for an entire decade was par for the 2012 election's unseemly course.

GATA | THE GATA DISPATCH: Jay Taylor: Canada's BNN doesn't want GATA mentioned on the air

Jay Taylor: Canada's BNN doesn't want GATA mentioned on the air

9:12p ET Sunday, August 5, 2012

Few financial newsletter writers work harder than Jay Taylor, editor of J. Taylor's Gold, Energy, and Tech Stocks newsletter (http://www.miningstocks.com/). Taylor not only provides weekly analysis from a hard-money point of view but also produces an Internet radio interview program on which GATA Chairman Bill Murphy and your secretary/treasurer have appeared and speaks on financial television and raido programs and at financial conferences around the world. Last week Taylor was appearing on Business News Network in Canada and his latest letter describes how he was urged not to mention GATA on the air.
This is a change of attitude for BNN, as for years, under the editorship of Jim O'Connell, the network was glad to inquire into gold market manipulation and let GATA be part of the discussion. But O'Connell died five years ago, perhaps taking BNN's courage with him.
Taylor's letter about BNN and GATA is excerpted below.
CHRIS POWELL, Secretary/Treasurer
Gold Anti-Trust Action Committee Inc.
* * *
By Jay Taylor
J. Taylor's Gold, Energy, and Tech Stocks Newsletter
Friday, August 3, 2012
http://www.miningstocks.com/

For some reason -- I'll let you imagine why -- the news media treats the name "GATA" with the same contempt and unfairness with which it treated Ron Paul.
How do I know free speech and fairness are denied GATA, a civil rights organization?
While I have suspected for quite some time that "GATA" was a dirty word in the minds of the establishment, I received first-hand evidence of it last week when I was interviewed by a producer for Business News Network in Canada before appearing on BNN's "Top Picks" show yesterday. (You can watch my comments on Dynacor, Sandstorm, and Timmins Gold here: http://watch.bnn.ca/#clip733129.)
Here is what happened.

The producer wanted to know why I thought the gold price had fallen on Thursday, as he thought it should have risen because of the decline in stock prices and a downturn in confidence in the European Union's resolve to "fix" Europe's economic problems. I suggested to him that I thought the work of GATA helped explain one possible answer to that question. I told him I thought GATA provided some pretty strong evidence that the gold price is from time to time rigged by the same folks responsible for the LIBOR fraud.

ICE Futures U.S.: Weekly Analysis of US Equity and Currency Markets.



Nick McDonald of Trade With Precision presents a concise technical analysis of these markets for the week ahead, using the Russell 2000® index and the ICE US Dollar Index® as pivotal focuses.
The weekly outlooks are available every Sunday evening by 8 p.m. ET. 

View the video market commentaries »

GATA | THE GATA DISPATCH: What a surprise: FT says CFTC to drop silver investigation

What a surprise: FT says CFTC to drop silver investigation

But such an outcome would be completely consistent with a finding that the really big player in the silver market is not JPMorgan at all but the U.S. government acting through intermediary brokerage houses. After all, as he signed the legislation demonetizing silver in 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson pledged that the U.S. government would rig the silver market if necessary to prevent the price from rising:
http://www.gata.org/node/11601
And the Gold Reserve Act of 1934, which created the U.S. Exchange Stabilization Fund, explicitly authorizes the U.S. treasury secretary to trade secretly in all markets on behalf of the U.S. government:
http://www.treasury.gov/resource-center/international/ESF/Pages/esf-inde...

* * *
Four-Year Silver Probe Set to Be Dropped
By Jack Farchy and Gregory Meyer
Financial Times, London
Sunday, August 5, 2012

http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/45329d42-dd97-11e1-8be2-00144feab49a.html
A four-year investigation into the possible manipulation of the the silver market looks increasingly likely to be dropped after US regulators failed to find enough evidence to support a legal case, according to three people familiar with the situation.
The Commodity Futures Trading Commission announced that it was investigating "complaints of misconduct in the silver market" in September 2008, following a barrage of allegations of manipulation from a group of precious metals investors.

In 2010, Bart Chilton, a CFTC commissioner, said that he believed there had been "fraudulent efforts" to "deviously control" the silver price.

 But after taking advice from two external consultancies, the first of which found irregularities on certain trading dates that it believed deserved more analysis, CFTC staff do not have sufficient evidence to bring a case, according to the people familiar with the situation.

The agency's five commissioners have not yet formally determined the outcome of the investigation, leaving the possibility that staff could be instructed to dig deeper. A CFTC spokesman said: "The investigation has not reached its conclusion." He declined further comment.

Ending the probe would infuriate some US silver investors, who claim that a group of large investment banks -- in particular, JPMorgan -- has conspired to drive the price of silver lower.
"I'm sure it will be met with some concern from a certain group of aggressive silver speculators," said one person familiar with the investigation.

In a recent blog post, Ted Butler, a newsletter publisher and unofficial champion for the silver investors, accused the CFTC of being "negligent in failing to terminate the obvious manipulation ongoing in silver."
The CFTC has analysed over 100,000 documents and interviewed dozens of witnesses since it began investigating the market in 2008, it said last year. The people familiar with the situation said the evidence included records from JPMorgan.

The conclusion of the investigation will come as a relief to JPMorgan. Although no company or individual was named in the CFTC investigation, the Wall Street bank has suffered a torrent of allegations from silver investors on the blogosphere.

One campaign exhorted sympathetic readers to "crash JPMorgan" by buying silver -- based on the assumption, which JPMorgan has repeatedly denied, that the US bank has a large bet on lower silver prices.
In addition, a class-action lawsuit has been filed against JPMorgan. Lawyers for the bank have asked a judge to dismiss it, arguing that plaintiffs "fail to identify a single trade" showing manipulation.

Blythe Masters, head of commodities at JPMorgan, in an April interview with CNBC conceded that there had been "a tremendous amount of speculation, particularly in the blogosphere, about this topic," but maintained that the bank had no large bets on silver prices.

"We have no stake in whether prices rise or decline," she said. JPMorgan declined to comment on the CFTC investigation.

Previous CFTC silver inquiries in 2004 and 2008 found no evidence of wrongdoing.



Join GATA here:
Toronto Resource Investment Conference
Thursday-Friday, September 27-28, 2012
Toronto Sheraton Centre Hotel
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
http://www.cambridgehouse.com/event/toronto-resource-investment-conferen..

* * *

NYT Today's Headlines | Top News: Record Spending by Obama's Camp Shrinks Coffers

The New York Times
August 5, 2012

Today's Headlines


TOP NEWS

Record Spending by Obama's Camp Shrinks Coffers

By NICHOLAS CONFESSORE and JO CRAVEN McGINTY
President Obama has spent more campaign cash more quickly than any incumbent in recent history, about $400 million from the beginning of last year to June 30 this year.

Two Top Afghan Security Ministers Face Dismissal

By ALISSA J. RUBIN
Lawmakers explained a move that would cast out the heads of the army and national police in the middle of a war as part of a fight against crippling corruption and cronyism.
The iEconomy

In Pursuit of Nissan, a Jobs Lesson for the Tech Industry?

By BILL VLASIC, HIROKO TABUCHI and CHARLES DUHIGG
Executives have long said America can't compete in building electronic devices. But the migration of carmaking from Japan is a case study in the most unlikely of transformations.
QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"All our pumpkins have died. Zucchinis? Dead. Our green beans are just sitting there turning rubbery. And my gladiolas never came up at all."
VIVIAN HALLETT, on the drought that has kept her from entering any produce in the Coles County Fair in Illinois.

Sports

Interactive Graphic: Bob Beamon's Long Olympic Shadow

Beamon's performance in Mexico City in 1968 would beat the winner in London, Greg Rutherford of Britain, by about two feet.
Opinion
Opinion

Auto Crrect Ths!

Our phones are turning words like "eating biscuits" into "rating bisexuals," and cyberspace is awash with outrage.
WORLD

Leader's Torture in the '70s Stirs Ghosts in Brazil

By SIMON ROMERO
A Brazilian truth commission is gathering details on decades-old torture cases, including that of President Dilma Rousseff.

Intensified Syrian Fighting Reported in Battles for Damascus and Aleppo

By DAMIEN CAVE and HWAIDA SAAD
Explosions and heavy fighting rocked Syria's two largest cities on Saturday, witnesses and activists said, as the Syrian government and rebel fighters struggled to gain an advantage in the country's bloody, 17-month-old conflict.

He May Be Leader of Peru, but to Outspoken Kin, He's Just a Disappointment

By WILLIAM NEUMAN
President Ollanta Humala tries to sidestep the negative attention, but the criticism by his own kin mirrors a growing dissatisfaction by the public.
U.S.

Fairs, Like Crops, Are Drooping With the Heat

By MONICA DAVEY
At county and state fairs across corn country this year, the most widespread drought since the 1950s is evident, as the hot summer has seeped into even the cheeriest, oldest tradition.

Plan to Speed Travel With Toll Road in Maine Hits a Nerve

By KATHARINE Q. SEELYE
The idea of an east-west highway has been kicking around for decades. But a proposed private road has a good chance of becoming reality, and opponents say it would ruin the state.

Lucrative Gambling Pits Tribe Against Tribe

By NORIMITSU ONISHI
Plans for two tribal casinos are drawing fierce opposition from nearby tribes with casinos that they say will be hurt by the newcomers.
POLITICS

Copying Obama's '08 Strategy, Romney Takes to the Ground in Colorado

By JACK HEALY
Mitt Romney's fate in Colorado may depend on whether his campaign can build a ground-level presence like the one that helped carry President Obama four years ago.

Making a Pitch to the Tea Party in Indiana

By RICHARD A. OPPEL Jr.
Mr. Romney, who often speaks favorably about bipartisanship, did not discuss the issue during a campaign stop with Richard Mourdock, whose views differ.

State Department and Pentagon Plan for Post-Assad Syria

By STEVEN LEE MYERS and THOM SHANKER
The agencies have created cells to look at potential problems in the wake of President Bashar al-Assad's fall, hoping to avert the types of mistakes made after the invasion of Iraq.
BUSINESS

Marcus Samuelsson, a Chef, a Brand and Then Some

By ADRIENNE CARTER
The question for Marcus Samuelsson, the chef, restaurateur, author, food impresario and media personality, is how far and how fast he can expand his personal brand.

A Spanish Hat Factory Thrives on Orders From a Finicky Brooklyn

By DOREEN CARVAJAL
A hat factory in Seville has found an unlikely source of revenue amid the economic downturn - the Hasidic community in Brooklyn.
Prototype

If the Name Gets in the Way, Change It

By NICOLE LaPORTE
Changing the company's name can make a big difference, whether to ease confusion, rebuild a brand or flee a negative connotation.
TECHNOLOGY
Digital Domain

Letting the Cloud Watch Over the Farm

By RANDALL STROSS
Cloud computing and other Internet services are coming to agriculture, allowing farmers to keep better track of their crops, livestock and expenses.

Tribe Revives Language on Verge of Extinction

By KIRK JOHNSON
An American Indian language once relegated to near extinction now has an online dictionary.
App City

Tricks to Finding Food and to Paying for It

By JOSHUA BRUSTEIN
New applications can help diners locate a meal, and make sure that certain someone pays what he owes.
SPORTS

After Long Road, Nothing Left to Do but Win

By JERÉ LONGMAN
Oscar Pistorius, the South African double amputee who struggled for six years to reach the Olympics, made history by competing in a first-round 400-meter heat and advancing to the semifinals.

With One Last Gold, Phelps Caps Career That Inspired a Generation

By KAREN CROUSE
Like Tiger Woods before him, Michael Phelps, the most decorated Olympic athlete in history, was a prodigy with a master plan to dominate his sport.
Inside the Rings

For Lolo Jones, Everything Is Image

By JERÉ LONGMAN
Lolo Jones has received far greater publicity than any other American track and field athlete competing in the London Games, based not on achievement but on her exotic beauty and on a marketing campaign.
ARTS

Imperiled Legacy for African Art

By HOLLAND COTTER
In Djenne-Djenno in sub-Saharan Africa, theft and fighting have left many archaeological sites open to looting and outright destruction.

Busy Chris Rock Is Just Itching for Dirty Work

By DAVE ITZKOFF
"I'm ready to curse," the actor and comedian said. "I'm ready to really, really be a bad boy."

A Renaissance Man, and Many Eras Besides

By WILLIAM ROBIN
The conductor Pablo Heras-Casada, 34, has only recently begun engaging with the most popular classical music, having concentrated before on both early and contemporary compositions.
NEW YORK / REGION

Man Suspected of Faking His Death Has Returned to New York, Officials Say

By MICHAEL SCHWIRTZ
Police officials investigating the disappearance of Raymond Roth, who vanished off Jones Beach last week, said that they had not decided whether to charge him with a crime.

A Confederacy of Bachelors

By HILARY HOWARD
Four men, friends from New York University, have spent much of the last 18 years living together in low-rent spaces they found in New York City.

A Lab, a Home, a Memory

By C. J. HUGHES
A Staten Island farmhouse, on the property where Frederick Law Olmsted developed his style of landscape design, is now overseen by the city's parks and recreation department.
MAGAZINE

Tunneling Below Second Avenue

By KIM TINGLEY
The saga of the subway track that New York City has been postponing, restarting, debating, financing, definancing and otherwise meaning to get in the ground since 1929.

Oakland, the Last Refuge of Radical America

By JONATHAN MAHLER
The Occupy movement is still wreaking havoc in Oakland, the world capital of anticapitalism.

99 Ways to Be Naughty in Kazakhstan

By EDITH ZIMMERMAN
Yes, there is a Cosmo for pretty much every country you can think of. Selling American friskiness has never been, like, so awesome.
EDITORIALS
Editorial

Massachusetts Takes On Health Costs

Massachusetts will be the first state to try to cap overall health care spending, both private and public, so that it will grow no faster than the state economy.
Editorial

Too Many Prisoners

Solutions that would lower the federal prison population include repealing mandatory minimum sentences and reducing drug prosecutions.
Editorial

Working While Sick

Millions of Americans have to work when ill or take unpaid sick days, which can lead to financial hardship or dismissal. A national law requiring businesses to provide paid sick leave is needed.
OP-ED
Opinion

Wanting to Kill

By MATTHEW PARKER
When my brother was murdered, I became a believer in the death penalty.
Op-Ed Columnist

Truculence Before Truth

By FRANK BRUNI
Harry Reid's unsubstantiated charge that Mitt Romney paid no taxes for an entire decade was par for the 2012 election's unseemly course.
Op-Ed Columnist

The Love Goddess Who Keeps Right on Seducing

By MAUREEN DOWD
Some like it hot, lush and vulnerable. Why the luminous Marilyn continues to glow.
SUNDAY REVIEW
Capital Ideas

Why D.C. Is Doing So Well

By DAVID LEONHARDT
The success this season of the Washington Nationals mirrors the resurgence of the team's home city.
News Analysis

Internet Pirates Will Always Win

By NICK BILTON
BitTorrent sites are always one step ahead of the media companies.
ON THIS DAY
On August 5, 1963, the United States, Britain and the Soviet Union signed a treaty in Moscow banning nuclear tests in the atmosphere, outer space and underwater.