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Jul 29, 2012

ICE Futures U.S: Weekly Analysis of US Equity and Currency Markets.




Nick McDonald of Trade With Precision presents a concise technical analysis of these markets for the week ahead, using the Russell 2000® index and the ICE US Dollar Index® as pivotal focuses. The weekly outlooks are available every Sunday evening by 8 p.m. ET.

View the video market commentaries »

NYT Global Update | Top news: Europe Bank Chief's Task Is Now to Back Up His Words


Global Update


TOP NEWS
News Analysis

Europe Bank Chief's Task Is Now to Back Up His Words

By JACK EWING
At a meeting this week, the president of the European Central Bank faces the complicated task of delivering on last week's promise to do "whatever it takes to preserve the euro."
The Caucus

Romney Issues Sharp Defense of Israel's Stance on Iran

By JODI RUDOREN and ASHLEY PARKER
Speaking to supporters in Jerusalem, Mitt Romney said preventing Iran from obtaining nuclear capability would be his "highest national security priority" if he is elected.

Syrian Refugees Are Stung by a Hostile Reception in Iraq

By DURAID ADNAN and ROD NORDLAND
Alone among Syria's Muslim neighbors, Iraq is actively resisting receiving refugees from the conflict across the border, and is making those who do arrive anything but comfortable.
Sports

Photographs: London 2012

Emotional victories, stunning defeats and fierce competition from the Olympic Games.
Opinion

Op-Ed Contributor

Africa's Third Liberation

By JEFFREY HERBST and GREG MILLS
To ensure a new future with both jobs and development, African governments will have to embark on a path down which few have so far ventured.
WORLD

Spain's Jobless Rely on Family, a Frail Crutch

By SUZANNE DALEY
As the effects of years of recession pile up in the country, more and more Spanish families are leaning hard on their elderly relatives. But it has not been easy for any of the generations.
News Analysis

Egypt's Islamists Tread Lightly, but Skeptics Squirm

By ROD NORDLAND
President Mohamed Morsi has made no apologies for his Islamism, but he seems to be going out of his way to allay fears that the Muslim Brotherhood would radically change Egypt.

Fighters Replace Tourists Crossing Over From Syria to an Idyllic Turkish Town

By JEFFREY GETTLEMAN
Antakya, a picturesque border town, has attracted Syrian fighters and foreign jihadists seeking refuge and medical care, as Syria's civil war becomes Turkey's national security headache.
BUSINESS

The Bond Market Discovers a New Leading Man

By GERALDINE FABRIKANT
Mohamed El-Erian, chief executive of Pimco, the bond fund giant, has stepped out of the long shadow of Bill Gross, its longtime maestro.

Want to Graduate? First, Create a Company

By HANNAH SELIGSON
A four-month training program, taught in 27 cities worldwide, has one basic goal: to have each of its students start a fully operational company.
Fundamentally

Giant Stocks Are Walking Tall Again

By PAUL J. LIM
The megacap stocks - those of the very largest American companies - have vastly outperformed the overall market over the last 18 months.
TECHNOLOGY

Apple Officials Said to Consider Stake in Twitter

By EVELYN M. RUSLI and NICK BILTON
Apple, which has stumbled in its efforts to get into social media, has talked with Twitter in recent months about making a strategic investment in it, according to people briefed on the matter.

In Sliding Internet Stocks, Some Hear Echo of 2000

By DAVID STREITFELD and EVELYN M. RUSLI
Tech companies that were thought to be the foundation of a new Internet era declined this week.
Bits

It's Hard to Stay Friends With a Digital Exercise Monitor

By JENNA WORTHAM
A wearable exercise tracker sounds like a great incentive for physical fitness. But a reporter found frustration in the way it measured her daily activity.
SPORTS
Global Soccer

Ukraine's Ruthless Finisher Takes on Politics

By ROB HUGHES
Andriy Shevchenko, a revered former soccer player, is hitting the tough-and-tumble field of Ukrainian politics.

Budapest Race Gave Formula One an Eastern Foothold

By BRAD SPURGEON
Started in 1986, the Hungarian Grand Prix gave the elite racing series a foothold in the Soviet bloc and also was at the forefront of a trend toward races in or near large cities.

Now Formula One Drivers Get Fine-Tuning, Too

By BRAD SPURGEON
A crucial area that has been overlooked until recently in Grand Prix racing is how to improve the performance of the driver's body and mind.
U.S. NEWS

Which Mother for Isabella? Civil Union Ends in an Abduction and Questions

By ERIK ECKHOLM
A custody battle "between two diametrically opposed worldviews on parentage and family" touches on contentious social and legal questions over what happens to children when civil unions dissolve.

Doctor Shortage Likely to Worsen With Health Law

By ANNIE LOWREY and ROBERT PEAR
Even as the new health care law expands insurance coverage, another problem faces many areas of the country: a lack of physicians, particularly primary care ones.
Political Memo

Obama's Team Taking Gamble Going Negative

By JEFF ZELENY
The opportunities and the risks are greater for President Obama, who seeks to shape perceptions of Mitt Romney just as more voters are starting to tune in to the race.
OPINION
Op-Ed Contributor

Africa's Third Liberation

By JEFFREY HERBST and GREG MILLS
To ensure a new future with both jobs and development, African governments will have to embark on a path down which few have so far ventured.
Op-Ed Columnist

Defining Religious Liberty Down

By ROSS DOUTHAT
The Chick-fil-A flap is the latest sign of confusion about what "free exercise" of religion means.
Op-Ed Columnist

Mitt's Olympic Meddle

By MAUREEN DOWD
Off with his head! Mitt Romney barely escapes the Tower of London.

NYT Today's Headlines | Business: The Bond Market Discovers a New Leading Man

Today's Headlines



TOP NEWS

Doctor Shortage Likely to Worsen With Health Law

By ANNIE LOWREY and ROBERT PEAR
Even as the new health care law expands insurance coverage, another problem faces many areas of the country: a lack of physicians, particularly primary care ones.
Political Memo

Obama's Team Taking Gamble Going Negative

By JEFF ZELENY
The opportunities and the risks are greater for President Obama, who seeks to shape perceptions of Mitt Romney just as more voters are starting to tune in to the race.

Spain's Jobless Rely on Family, a Frail Crutch

By SUZANNE DALEY
As the effects of years of recession pile up in the country, more and more Spanish families are leaning hard on their elderly relatives. But it has not been easy for any of the generations.
QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"We have a shortage of every kind of doctor, except for plastic surgeons and dermatologists. We'll have a 5,000-physician shortage in 10 years, no matter what anybody does."
DR. G. RICHARD OLDS, the dean of a new medical school at the University of California, Riverside.

Sports

Photographs: London 2012

Emotional victories, stunning defeats and fierce competition from the Olympic Games.
Opinion
Opinion

Is Algebra Necessary?

As American students wrestle with algebra, geometry and calculus - often losing that contest - the requirement of higher mathematics comes into question.
WORLD

Syrian Military Intensifies Assault on Rebels in Aleppo

By KAREEM FAHIM and ELLEN BARRY
It was not clear whether Saturday's attack was a limited foray by government troops or the beginning of a broader campaign.

Fighters Replace Tourists Crossing Over From Syria to an Idyllic Turkish Town

By JEFFREY GETTLEMAN
Antakya, a picturesque border town, has attracted Syrian fighters and foreign jihadists seeking refuge and medical care, as Syria's civil war becomes Turkey's national security headache.

Retiring Envoy to Afghanistan Exhorts U.S to Heed Its Past

By ALISSA J. RUBIN
Ryan C. Crocker, the diplomat most linked to the invasions of Iraq and Afghanistan, says policy makers must learn from those wars as they consider military options for current crises.
U.S.

Which Mother for Isabella? Civil Union Ends in an Abduction and Questions

By ERIK ECKHOLM
A custody battle "between two diametrically opposed worldviews on parentage and family" touches on contentious social and legal questions over what happens to children when civil unions dissolve.

Nuns Weigh Response to Scathing Vatican Rebuke

By LAURIE GOODSTEIN
American nuns meeting in St. Louis next week will decide whether to cooperate with three bishops assigned to supervise the overhaul of their organization.

In Maine, More Lobsters Than They Know What to Do With

By KATHARINE Q. SEELYE
The overabundance, attributed to warm weather and good conservation techniques, has led to fishermen receiving the lowest prices in 40 years.
POLITICS

Romney and Obama Strain to Show Gap on Foreign Policy

By PETER BAKER
Despite the posturing of their campaigns, President Obama and Mitt Romney diverge little on goals, disagreeing more over who has the most credibility wielding American power.

Romney Faces Perils and Opportunities in Israel

By JODI RUDOREN and ASHLEY PARKER
Mitt Romney, bolstered by a long relationship with Benjamin Netanyahu, has stepped into the always complicated relationship between the United States and Israel.

Fund-Raiser for Romney in Israel Bars Media

By ASHLEY PARKER
Mitt Romney's high-dollar breakfast with donors on Monday will be closed to the news media, his campaign decided, a change from the norm for him.
BUSINESS

The Bond Market Discovers a New Leading Man

By GERALDINE FABRIKANT
Mohamed El-Erian, chief executive of Pimco, the bond fund giant, has stepped out of the long shadow of Bill Gross, its longtime maestro.
Fair Game

Changed by Wall Street, for Wall Street

By GRETCHEN MORGENSON
In the 1990s, big brokerage firms pushed to have adjustable-rate mortgages tied to the Libor - long before much of the world learned what it was.
Fundamentally

Giant Stocks Are Walking Tall Again

By PAUL J. LIM
The megacap stocks - those of the very largest American companies - have vastly outperformed the overall market over the last 18 months.
TECHNOLOGY

Want to Graduate? First, Create a Company

By HANNAH SELIGSON
A four-month training program, taught in 27 cities worldwide, has one basic goal: to have each of its students start a fully operational company.
Bits

It's Hard to Stay Friends With a Digital Exercise Monitor

By JENNA WORTHAM
A wearable exercise tracker sounds like a great incentive for physical fitness. But a reporter found frustration in the way it measured her daily activity.
Common Sense

Behind eBay's Comeback

By JAMES B. STEWART
The Internet company's surprise earnings report was the result of technological innovation, a management overhaul and an embrace of new opportunities.
SPORTS

Phelps Lags Behind Lochte and Misses a Medal

By KAREN CROUSE
Michael Phelps, the two-time defending champion in the 400-meter individual medley, finished fourth. His United States teammate Ryan Lochte won by nearly four seconds.

New Pecking Order in Pool as China Wins Two Golds

By CHRISTOPHER CLAREY
Sun Yang of China won the 400-meter freestyle, and 16-year-old Ye Shiwen smashed the world record in the women's 400 individual medley

In Less Than Five Minutes, a Match and an Olympics End

By CAMPBELL ROBERTSON
Of the thousands of athletes at the London Games, Jacob Gnahoui, a practitioner of judo and Benin's flag bearer less than 11 hours earlier, was among the first to be eliminated.
ARTS

Walter Pichler, an Artist Who Bucked the Status Quo, Dies at 75

By DENISE GRADY
Mr. Pichler was an Austrian architect who, after a flurry of shows that won him international acclaim, moved away from the world of galleries, exhibitions and collectors.
Music Review

Introspection Celebrated in a Crowd

By JON PARELES
The R&B singer Frank Ocean performed songs from his debut album, "Channel Orange," at Terminal 5 on Thursday night.
Exhibition Review

They're Clever and Carnivorous

By EDWARD ROTHSTEIN
The American Museum of Natural History exhibition "Spiders Alive!" looks at the wonders of the 43,000 spider species.
NEW YORK / REGION

Kidnapped Man Is Found Inside a Detective's Garage

By MARC SANTORA and WILLIAM K. RASHBAUM
A 17-year veteran of the New York Police Department was suspended and four other men were arrested after a ransom phone call was traced to the detective's home in Queens.

The Short Life and Lonely Death of Sabrina Seelig

By ANEMONA HARTOCOLLIS
The family of Ms. Seelig, 22, says she suffered an agonizing death because the care she received at a struggling Brooklyn hospital was indifferent to negligent.
Big City

Living With Gunfire in the Background

By GINIA BELLAFANTE
In areas of the city where gunfire is common, residents feel the strain and adjust their habits to survive, the perversions of civility that only guns can introduce.
MAGAZINE

What Can Mississippi Learn From Iran?

By SUZY HANSEN
Nowhere is our health care system more broken and desperate than rural Mississippi. Can an approach used in Iran help save lives?

Janet Cardiff, George Bures Miller and the Power of Sound

By JOHN WRAY
The husband-and-wife artists have been "trying to escape reality for, like, 35 years."

A High Holy Whodunit

By RONEN BERGMAN
The Aleppo Codex is one of the most precious artifacts of the Jewish people. Was it stolen from its rightful owners?
EDITORIALS
Editorial

Migrants' Freedom Ride

Protesters, some undocumented, are planning to ride a bus through states with extreme anti-immigrant laws, calling for reform and dignity.
Editorial

Medicaid After the Supreme Court Decision

States that refuse to expand the program will cause needless harm and deaths to thousands of low-income people.
Editorial

Governor Cuomo at the Controls

Gov. Andrew Cuomo wants to control everything about him that could make its way to the press or the public. Such secrecy will not serve him well in the long run.
OP-ED
Opinion

Is Depression Inherited?

By DAPHNE MERKIN
I fear my susceptibility to darkness will somehow "rub off" onto my daughter.
Op-Ed Columnist

Political Fortunetelling

By FRANK BRUNI
The future of presidential campaigning awaits us, with familiar families, megabucks and Miley Cyrus.
Op-Ed Columnist

Mitt's Olympic Meddle

By MAUREEN DOWD
Off with his head! Mitt Romney barely escapes the Tower of London.
SUNDAY REVIEW
News Analysis

Which Records Get Shattered?

By NATE SILVER
Swimming makes the biggest splash at the Olympics, but track and field records are the ones that survive the test of time.
ON THIS DAY
Britain's Prince Charles married Lady Diana Spencer at St. Paul's Cathedral in London.