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Jul 22, 2012

CE Futures U.S: Weekly Analysis of US Equity and Currency Markets.

 

Get your trading week started with video outlooks on the US equity and currency markets. Nick McDonald of Trade With Precision presents a concise technical analysis of these markets for the week ahead, using the Russell 2000® index and the ICE US Dollar Index® as pivotal focuses.

NYT Global Update | Top News: Sicily's Fiscal Problems Threaten to Swamp Italy.

Global Update

TOP NEWS

Sicily's Fiscal Problems Threaten to Swamp Italy

By RACHEL DONADIO
As Prime Minister Mario Monti fights to protect Italy from perilous borrowing costs, some fear that Sicily has become "the Greece" of Italy and is at risk of defaulting on its high debts.

U.S. Drug War Expands to Africa, a Newer Hub for Cartels

By CHARLIE SAVAGE and THOM SHANKER
The United States, trying to combat Latin American groups that are using Africa to smuggle cocaine into Europe, has begun training an elite counternarcotics police unit in Ghana.
Changing of the Guard

China's Communist Elders Take Backroom Intrigue Beachside

By EDWARD WONG and JONATHAN ANSFIELD
Party elites and their families congregate in the resort of Beidaihe to swim and dine and shape the future of the world's most populous nation.
World

Photographs: In Southern Turkey, Syrian Refugees Wait Out The War

Thousands of Syrians are waiting out the war being fought just beyond the nearby border.
Opinion

Opinion

Life During Wartime

By JANINE DI GIOVANNI
Even with the violence, daily life in Syria has gone on. Pool parties. Weddings. Card games. But that normalcy will soon be a memory.
WORLD

Syrians Hold On to Optimism at a Tent City in Turkey

By C. J. CHIVERS
In one of nine Turkish-run camps, Syrians cheered by rebels' gains across the border insist their enemies are weakening and they will be going home.

Stymied at U.N., U.S. Refines Plan to Remove Assad

By ERIC SCHMITT and HELENE COOPER
The United States has for now abandoned efforts for a diplomatic settlement to Syria's conflict, and instead will add aid for opponents of President Bashar al-Assad.

Violence Continues in Syria's Main Cities

By NEIL MacFARQUHAR
Violent clashes continued on Sunday in certain quarters of Aleppo and Damascus as Syrian government forces fought to regain control over areas that rebels claimed to have seized in recent days.
BUSINESS

Swiss Freeports Are Home for a Growing Treasury of Art

By DAVID SEGAL
Business is thriving at Swiss freeports - those tax-free havens for valuables that are the closest thing to the Cayman Islands that the art world has to offer.
Essay

A Nation That's Losing Its Toolbox

By LOUIS UCHITELLE
The waning of manufacturing in the economy may be resulting in a dilution of craftsmanship - long a vital ingredient in the American self-image as a can-do people.

Murdoch Resigns From His British Papers' Boards

By JOHN F. BURNS and RAVI SOMAIYA
Rupert Murdoch's resignation from several of his newspapers' boards has raised speculation that he may be planning to sell the publications that built his global media empire.
TECHNOLOGY
Digital Domain

How a Cellphone's Case Can Imitate Its Maker

By RANDALL STROSS
The easy-to-open design of Google's new smartphones and tablets may be symbolic of its effort to become the un-Apple.

Maternity Leave? It's More Like a Pause

By ELISSA GOOTMAN and CATHERINE SAINT LOUIS
Women at the top of companies like Marissa Mayer, the new chief of Yahoo, have responsibilities that can't be put off, but also flexibility and child-care resources that others don't.
Slipstream

Consumer Data, but Not for Consumers

By NATASHA SINGER
When a reporter asked a database marketing company for details it had amassed about her - details that companies might use to profile and to judge her - the reply was anything but complete.
SPORTS

Last-Minute Collapse Hands Victory to Els

By CHRISTOPHER CLAREY
Adam Scott made four straight bogeys on the final four holes at Royal Lytham & St. Annes Golf Club, leaving a grand opportunity for Ernie Els, who managed to win the British Open by one stroke on Sunday.

Wiggins Rides Into Paris a Winner

By JON BRAND
Bradley Wiggins won the Tour de France in Paris on Sunday after leading the race in a dominant fashion for the past two weeks.

Alonso Wins German Grand Prix

By BRAD SPURGEON
By winning the race on Sunday, Fernando Alonso became the first Formula One driver to score three victories this year. He led the race from start to finish in one of his strongest drives of the season.
U.S. NEWS

An 'All-America City' Turns Inward in a Search for Answers That May Never Come

By DAN FROSCH
Long regarded as a place to raise a family, Aurora, Colo., has known its share of violence in the past, but the mass shooting has left the city staggered.

Art's Sale Value? Zero. The Tax Bill? $29 Million.

By PATRICIA COHEN
Even though its owners cannot legally sell "Canyon," an artwork by Robert Rauschenberg that features a stuffed bald eagle, the I.R.S. wants them to pay $29.2 million in taxes on it.
OPINION
Opinion

What's a Body to Do?

By CHRISTOPHER BUCKLEY
Since the Soviet Union folded, Russia has been tippy-toeing around the dead mouse on the national living room floor, namely Lenin's embalmed corpse.
Op-Ed Columnist

Women's Time to Shine

By FRANK BRUNI
In London, men have no monopoly on guts and glory. Girl power gets its sweaty, sinewy due.
Op-Ed Columnist

The Way We Fear Now

By ROSS DOUTHAT
We are confronting villains who lack political motivations, who are nihilists, who "just want to watch the world burn."

NYT Today's Headlines | Business Sunday, July 22 2012: Swiss Freeports Are Home for a Growing Treasury of Art

Today's Headlines


TOP NEWS

Before and After Massacre, Puzzles Line Suspect's Path

By JACK HEALY and SERGE F. KOVALESKI
James Eagan Holmes, 24, who is suspected of killing 12 moviegoers in Colorado, left behind a series of explosive traps in his apartment, the police said, and a litany of questions.

U.S. Drug War Expands to Africa, a Newer Hub for Cartels

By CHARLIE SAVAGE and THOM SHANKER
The United States, trying to combat Latin American groups that are using Africa to smuggle cocaine into Europe, has begun training an elite counternarcotics police unit in Ghana.

Strategist Steers the Right's Vast Money Machine

By NICHOLAS CONFESSORE
This year, Carl Forti, who served as the political director of Mitt Romney's first White House campaign, will deploy more political money than Senator John McCain spent running for president in 2008.
QUOTATION OF THE DAY
""It's a place that we need to get ahead of - we're already behind the curve in some ways, and we need to catch up.""
JEFFREY P. BREEDEN, a top official at the Drug Enforcement Administration, on fighting drug trafficking in Africa.

U.S.

Photographs: In Wake of Shooting, Tears and a Trap

As the victims of a deadly movie theater shooting were mourned by friends and loved ones, the police disarmed a series of explosives left in the apartment of the suspect, James Holmes.
Opinion
Smoke from a bomb that killed three top officials clouds Syria's capital on July 18.
Opinion

Life During Wartime

Even with the violence, daily life in Syria has gone on. Pool parties. Weddings. Card games. But that normalcy will soon be a memory.
WORLD

Stymied at U.N., U.S. Refines Plan to Remove Assad

By ERIC SCHMITT and HELENE COOPER
Though it will not provide arms to the Syrian rebels, the U.S. is likely to supply intelligence and communication aid to help forcibly bring down the government of President Bashar al-Assad.
Changing of the Guard

China's Communist Elders Take Backroom Intrigue Beachside

By EDWARD WONG and JONATHAN ANSFIELD
Party elites and their families congregate in the resort of Beidaihe to swim and dine and shape the future of the world's most populous nation.

Syrians Hold On to Optimism at a Tent City in Turkey

By C. J. CHIVERS
In one of nine Turkish-run camps, Syrians cheered by rebels' gains across the border insist their enemies are weakening and they will be going home.
U.S.

From a Dark Theater, Tales of Protection and Loss

By ERICA GOODE and DAN FROSCH
Their families, bonded in grieving, recalled the victims of the attack at an Aurora, Colo., movie theater with a mixture of love and the numbness of disbelief.

For Coast Guard Patrol North of Alaska, Much to Learn in a Remote New Place

By KIRK JOHNSON
As oil-drilling operations, tourists and freight haulers flock to an area once forbiddingly remote, the Coast Guard is arriving, too, for its biggest-ever patrol effort in the waters north of Alaska.

Alexander Cockburn, Left-Wing Writer, Is Dead at 71

By COLIN MOYNIHAN
Mr. Cockburn took pleasure in condemning what he saw as the outrages of the right and what he often considered the tepidness and timidity of the American liberal establishment.
POLITICS

In New Exhibit, Disney Lends Its Star Power to Reagan, and Vice Versa

By ADAM NAGOURNEY and BROOKS BARNES
Hundreds of people recently lined up outside the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library waiting to view a most unlikely addition: Mickey Mouse.

Romney Aide Helps States Comply With Health Care Law

By ROBERT PEAR
Michael O. Leavitt's work on insurance exchanges has upset conservatives who want states to resist the Affordable Care Act.

Senate Candidate and Supreme Court Have a History

By AMAN BATHEJA
Ted Cruz, a Republican and a United States Senate hopeful, has argued before the court nine times, more than any practicing lawyer in Texas or any current member of Congress.
BUSINESS

Swiss Freeports Are Home for a Growing Treasury of Art

By DAVID SEGAL
Business is thriving at Swiss freeports - those tax-free havens for valuables that are the closest thing to the Cayman Islands that the art world has to offer.
Essay

A Nation That's Losing Its Toolbox

By LOUIS UCHITELLE
The waning of manufacturing in the economy may be resulting in a dilution of craftsmanship - long a vital ingredient in the American self-image as a can-do people.

Murdoch Resigns From His British Papers' Boards

By JOHN F. BURNS and RAVI SOMAIYA
Rupert Murdoch's resignation from several of his newspapers' boards has raised speculation that he may be planning to sell the publications that built his global media empire.
TECHNOLOGY
Digital Domain

How a Cellphone's Case Can Imitate Its Maker

By RANDALL STROSS
The easy-to-open design of Google's new smartphones and tablets may be symbolic of its effort to become the un-Apple.

Maternity Leave? It's More Like a Pause

By ELISSA GOOTMAN and CATHERINE SAINT LOUIS
Women at the top of companies like Marissa Mayer, the new chief of Yahoo, have responsibilities that can't be put off, but also flexibility and child-care resources that others don't.
Slipstream

Consumer Data, but Not for Consumers

By NATASHA SINGER
When a reporter asked a database marketing company for details it had amassed about her - details that companies might use to profile and to judge her - the reply was anything but complete.
SPORTS

Scott Stakes Claim to Open Lead

By CHRISTOPHER CLAREY
Adam Scott, a 32-year-old Australian whose caddie, Steve Williams, used to work for Tiger Woods, shot a 68 to take a four-stroke lead into the final round of the British Open.

'Job Almost Done,' Wiggins Awaits Only Coronation After Stage Win

By JON BRAND
Bradley Wiggins all but sealed the Tour de France title Saturday, capturing the final time trial with a commanding show of authority.

Ride, Britannia

By GREG BISHOP
Britain set out to dominate the sport of cycling and has transformed its program from white elephant to gold medal factory.
ARTS

Art's Sale Value? Zero. The Tax Bill? $29 Million.

By PATRICIA COHEN
Even though eagle protection laws prohibit the owners of the artwork "Canyon" from legally selling it, the I.R.S. has appraised it at $65 million and wants them to pay nearly half that amount in taxes.

River of Hope in the Bronx

By MICHAEL KIMMELMAN
The yearslong process of cleaning up the Bronx River and the land along its banks continues, with some notable, even miraculous, successes.
Arts & Leisure

A Real-Life Fairy Tale, Long in the Making and Set to Old Tunes

By LARRY ROHTER
The film "Searching for Sugar Man," opening on Friday in New York and Los Angeles, charts the strange career of the singer and songwriter Rodriguez.
NEW YORK / REGION

Follow That Tourist

By LIZ ROBBINS
The city's eight million residents and its 50.9 million annual visitors live in different realities; here, a New Yorker's quest to see Tourists' New York.

Right Day and Airline. The Airport? Um, No

By SARAH MASLIN NIR
With three major airports less than 20 miles from Midtown Manhattan, some New Yorkers have found themselves in the exasperating situation of taking a cab to where their planes were not.

Little-Loved Statue May Be Exiled to a Brooklyn Cemetery

By SARAH MASLIN NIR
"Civic Virtue" may end up amid graves, but that is not a concession to those who, over the years, have wanted it figuratively dead.
MAGAZINE

The Near Perfection of Kohei Uchimura

By LISA KATAYAMA
Can the Japanese gymnast nicknamed Superman steal the show at the London Olympics?

Let's Play Medalball!

By NATE SILVER
A statistical analysis of how "small market" countries can win big at the Olympics.

Greg Ousley Is Sorry for Killing His Parents. Is That Enough?

By SCOTT ANDERSON
Nineteen years ago, Ousley murdered his mother and father at age 14. So why does he think he deserves to get out of prison?
EDITORIALS
Editorial

A Formula for Cutting Health Costs

A health care system owned and managed by Alaska's native people has achieved astonishing results in improving the health of its enrollees while cutting the costs of treating them.
Editorial

Israel's Embattled Democracy

The disintegration of Benjamin Netanyahu's new coalition after only 10 weeks is the latest in a string of developments making political compromise difficult in Israel.
Editorial | Sunday Observer

In Arpaio's Arizona, They Fought Back

By LAWRENCE DOWNES
Many brave people have fought back against Sheriff Joe Arpaio's anti-immigrant campaign. Now, with a lawsuit under way in Phoenix, their work is finally being recognized.
OP-ED
Op-Ed Columnist

Women's Time to Shine

By FRANK BRUNI
In London, men have no monopoly on guts and glory. Girl power gets its sweaty, sinewy due.
Op-Ed Columnist

The Way We Fear Now

By ROSS DOUTHAT
We are confronting villains who lack political motivations, who are nihilists, who "just want to watch the world burn."
Op-Ed Columnist

Paterno Sacked Off His Pedestal

By MAUREEN DOWD
"Faust" comes to Beaver Stadium: A saint in cleats sells his soul to the devil.
SUNDAY REVIEW
Capital Ideas

There's Still Hope for the Planet

By DAVID LEONHARDT
The world's largest economies may now be in the process of creating a climate-change response that does not depend on raising the price of dirty energy.
Dispatch

Israel, When the Lights Go Down

By JODI RUDOREN
At the Jerusalem Film Festival, seeking insight into Israeli society in the way it presents itself on the silver screen.
ON THIS DAY
On July 22, 1934, a man identified as bank robber John Dillinger was shot to death by federal agents in Chicago.