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Jun 24, 2012

ICE Futures U.S.: Weekly Analysis of US Equity and Currency Markets.




McDonald of Trade With Precision presents a concise technical analysis of these markets for the week ahead, using the Russell 2000® index and the ICE US Dollar Index® as pivotal focuses.
The weekly outlooks are available every Sunday evening by 8 p.m. ET.  You can visit

theice.com/icecommentary at your convenience—the weekly video commentaries remain on the website until new commentaries are posted.

View the video market commentaries »



NYT Global Update: For Islamists in Egypt, Morsi Victory Is a Symbolic Win | Top news

Global Update


TOP NEWS

For Islamists in Egypt, Morsi Victory Is a Symbolic Win

By DAVID D. KIRKPATRICK
Sixteen months after the military took over at the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak, Mohamed Morsi's victory is an ambiguous milestone in the promised transition to democracy.

U.S. Drug Agent Kills Suspect in Honduran Drug Raid

By CHARLIE SAVAGE
American officials said the agent fired in self-defense, but the shooting brought further attention to the United States' growing involvement in counternarcotics operations in Central America.
The New Islamists

Libya Democracy Clashes With Fervor for Jihad

By DAVID D. KIRKPATRICK
Two jihadis in Libya represent opposing directions for Islamists, democracy or militancy with Taliban-style rule, and for the moment, democracy appears to have the upper hand.
World

IHT Rendezvous

U.N. Report from Rio on Environment a 'Suicide Note'

By MARK MCDONALD
The conference on sustainable development, commonly known as Rio+20, was so lacking in enforceable goals that some participants were derisively calling it "Rio Minus 20."
Opinion

Opinion

Political Scientists Are Lousy Forecasters

By JACQUELINE STEVENS
Chimps randomly throwing darts at boards are about as likely to make accurate predictions about the future as political scientists.
WORLD

Greece's New Leaders to Miss Crucial Meeting

By LIZ ALDERMAN
Prime Minister Antonis Samaras and his nominee for finance minister nominee have been in the hospital since Friday.

Bankers Call for Wider Measures to Stem Crisis

By JACK EWING
An organization that serves as an umbrella for the world's largest central banks warned that they cannot cope with the euro zone crisis alone.

As Hopes for Reform Fade in Bahrain, Protesters Turn Anger on United States

By KAREEM FAHIM
With the Obama administration's resumption of arms sales to the ruling monarchy, Bahrainis demanding political liberties and social equality have become critical of the United States.
BUSINESS
The iEconomy

Apple's Retail Army, Long on Loyalty but Short on Pay

By DAVID SEGAL
While consumers tend to think of Apple's headquarters as the company's heart and soul, a majority of its workers in the United States are hourly wage earners selling iPhones and MacBooks.

Hedge Fund Manager to Pay $405 Million in Madoff Settlement

By DIANA B. HENRIQUES
J. Ezra Merkin, whose funds lost about $1.2 billion when Mr. Madoff's fraud collapsed in 2008, has agreed to pay $405 million over three years to compensate his investors.

A Georgia Town Takes the People's Business Private

By DAVID SEGAL
Cities across the United States have dabbled for years with various levels of privatization, but few have taken the idea as far as Sandy Springs, Ga.
TECHNOLOGY
Digital Domain

'Exergames' Don't Cure Young Couch Potatoes

By RANDALL STROSS
Researchers found no evidence that children who received active video games were more active than children who received games that were more passive.
Slipstream

E-Tailer Customization: Convenient or Creepy?

By NATASHA SINGER
Online retailers are turning to a handful of specialty companies to help them analyze customer data and segment their audiences for special treatment.
The Haggler

Three Months in Customer Service Limbo

By DAVID SEGAL
A reader has been trying to have his Hewlett-Packard Envy laptop repaired for more than three months, and has yet to see results.
SPORTS

France Plays to Save Face, Not Win

By ROB HUGHES
Coaches positioned eight players in a protective mode around their penalty boxes. That concedes initiative automatically to the opponents.

All Blacks Sweep Series With 60-0 Rout of Ireland

By EMMA STONEY
Typically teams that win the Rugby World Cup find it hard to keep that momentum going in the year or two that follows their coronations, but New Zealand is determined to buck that trend.

Schumacher Back on the F1 Podium at Last

By REUTERS
Michael Schumacher was taken by surprise on Sunday after ending up on the Formula One podium for the first time in nearly six years.
U.S. NEWS

Helpful Hands on Life's Last Segregated Journey

By KIM SEVERSON
When a black person dies in one of the rural counties around Madison, Ga., chances are the body will end up in the hands of Charles Menendez.

Supporters Slow to Grasp Health Law's Legal Risks

By PETER BAKER
Early confidence in the law's constitutionality, based on Supreme Court precedents, proved to be a miscalculation that put the White House on the defensive as its legal strategy evolved over the last two years.

With Wild West Spirit, Tombstone Fights for Its Water

By FERNANDA SANTOS
When the government placed restrictions on repairs to pipes on federal land, a volunteer posse set out to do the work by hand and make a point about a storied Arizona town.
OPINION
Op-Ed Contributor

It's Happening, but Not in Rio

By JIM LEAPE
If you looked around in Rio this week, you saw where the action really is -- local and national governments, companies, NGOs, labor unions finding ways to get on with it.
Op-Ed Columnist

Not-So-Crazy in Tehran

By NICHOLAS D. KRISTOF
Iran is a much more complex country than many in the West realize. A bit of humility and nuance is needed in responding to the country's bluster.
Op-Ed Columnist

The Rise of Popularism

By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
A recent trip to Europe raised the question: if everyone's following the polls and Twitter, etc., who's leading?

NYT Breaking News: Mohamed Morsi of Muslim Brotherhood Declared Winner of Egyptian Presidency



Breaking News Alert
The New York Times
Sunday, June 24, 2012
-----

Mohamed Morsi of Muslim Brotherhood Declared Winner of Egyptian Presidency


Election regulators named Mohamed Morsi of the Muslim Brotherhood the winner of Egypt’s first competitive presidential elections, handing the Islamist group a symbolic triumph and a new weapon in its struggle for power with the ruling military council.

His victory is an ambiguous milestone in Egypt’s promised transition to democracy after the ouster 16 months ago of President Hosni Mubarak. After an election that international monitors called credible, the military-led government has recognized an electoral victory by an opponent of military rule over a former air force general, Ahmed Shafik, who promised harmony with the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces. A public ballot count after the polls closed last weekend had already shown Mr. Morsi the winner, pending certification by a commission of Mubarak-appointed judges.

Read More:
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/25/world/middleeast/mohamed-morsi-of-muslim-brotherhood-declared-as-egypts-president.html?emc=na

NYT Today's Headlines: Apple's Retail Army, Long on Loyalty but Short on Pay | The Economy

Today's Headlines




TOP NEWS
The iEconomy

Apple's Retail Army, Long on Loyalty but Short on Pay

By DAVID SEGAL
While consumers tend to think of Apple's headquarters as the company's heart and soul, a majority of its workers in the United States are hourly wage earners selling iPhones and MacBooks.
The New Islamists

Libya Democracy Clashes With Fervor for Jihad

By DAVID D. KIRKPATRICK
Two jihadis in Libya represent opposing directions for Islamists, democracy or militancy with Taliban-style rule, and for the moment, democracy appears to have the upper hand.

Wave of Violence Swallows More Women in Juárez

By DAMIEN CAVE
Ciudad Juárez became infamous for attacks beginning in the 1990s that left hundreds of women dead, but as international attention moved on, the killings have continued.
QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"I was earning $11.25 an hour. Part of me was thinking, 'This is great. I'm an Apple fan, the store is doing really well.' But when you look at the amount of money the company is making and then you look at your paycheck, it's kind of tough."
JORDAN GOLSON, who sold about $750,000 worth of computers and gadgets at the Apple Store in Salem, N.H.

Health
The Well Quiz: Supersize Soft Drinks
Well

The Well Quiz: Supersize Soft Drinks

How many bottles of cola would fill a supersize fast-food drink cup? Take the Well Soda Quiz to find out.
Opinion
Capital Ideas

Old vs. Young

We are now a partisan country in many ways, but one dividing line - the generation gap - has been largely overlooked.
WORLD

In Egypt, Declaration of Winner in Presidential Contest Is Said to Be Near

By DAVID D. KIRKPATRICK
The panel overseeing Egypt's presidential election said it will declare an official winner on Sunday, though the announcement itself may be part of a negotiation for power.

As Hopes for Reform Fade in Bahrain, Protesters Turn Anger on United States

By KAREEM FAHIM
With the Obama administration's resumption of arms sales to the ruling monarchy, Bahrainis demanding political liberties and social equality have become critical of the United States.

Turkey Vows Action After Downing of Jet by Syria

By LIAM STACK
Turkey's president said his country would do "whatever is necessary," complicating a tense relationship.
U.S.

More Stringent Requirements Send Nurses Back to School

By RICHARD PÉREZ-PEÑA
Hundreds of hospitals have started to require that their nurses have at least a bachelor's degree, fueling efforts by schools to make their nursing graduates more competitive.

Helpful Hands on Life's Last Segregated Journey

By KIM SEVERSON
When a black person dies in one of the rural counties around Madison, Ga., chances are the body will end up in the hands of Charles Menendez.

With Wild West Spirit, Tombstone Fights for Its Water

By FERNANDA SANTOS
When the government placed restrictions on repairs to pipes on federal land, a volunteer posse set out to do the work by hand and make a point about a storied Arizona town.
POLITICS

Supporters Slow to Grasp Health Law's Legal Risks

By PETER BAKER
Early confidence in the law's constitutionality, based on Supreme Court precedents, proved to be a miscalculation that left the White House on the defensive over the last two years.
White House Memo

Wearing Brave Face, Obama Braces for Health Care Ruling

By JODI KANTOR
Though optimistic in public, the White House in private is weighing its options in case the Supreme Court invalidates all or part of the health care law.

For Wealthy Romney Donors, Up Close and Personal Access

By MICHAEL BARBARO
The campaign offered an extraordinary level of access to Mitt Romney at a three-day retreat that even seasoned political contributors said dwarfed previous presidential powwows.
BUSINESS

A Georgia Town Takes the People's Business Private

By DAVID SEGAL
Cities across the United States have dabbled for years with various levels of privatization, but few have taken the idea as far as Sandy Springs, Ga.

Greek Coalition Outlines Plan to Renegotiate Loan Deal

By NIKI KITSANTONIS
The new government aims to revoke certain taxes, suspend planned layoffs in the bloated public sector and extend by two years the deadline for imposing additional austerity measures.

Former Russian Minister Warns of Economic Ebb

By ANDREW E. KRAMER and DAVID M. HERSZENHORN
Aleksei L. Kudrin, the former minister of finance, warned at a news conference that Russia was in danger of falling into a recession.
TECHNOLOGY
Digital Domain

'Exergames' Don't Cure Young Couch Potatoes

By RANDALL STROSS
Researchers found no evidence that children who received active video games were more active than children who received games that were more passive.
Slipstream

E-Tailer Customization: Convenient or Creepy?

By NATASHA SINGER
Online retailers are turning to a handful of specialty companies to help them analyze customer data and segment their audiences for special treatment.
The Haggler

Three Months in Customer Service Limbo

By DAVID SEGAL
A reader has been trying to have his Hewlett-Packard Envy laptop repaired for more than three months, and has yet to see results.
SPORTS
Yankees 4, Mets 3

Staying Patient, Yankees Bash Two Homers to Top Mets

By ZACH SCHONBRUN
The Mets built a 3-0 lead, but against the Yankees' power, it was hardly safe. Raul Ibanez tied the game with a three-run homer two batters before Eric Chavez hit a pinch-hit solo shot to left field.

Juror Says Panel Had Little Doubt on Sandusky's Guilt

By JOE DRAPE and NATE TAYLOR
When the jury learned after its verdict that Jerry Sandusky's adopted son had joined his accusers, "that was total confirmation that we made the right decision," said one member.

Sandusky Son With Troubled Past Went From Ally to Accuser

By NATE TAYLOR
Records and interviews suggest Matt Sandusky's story is a complicated and painful one, with some nightmarish scenes from life with his adoptive father, Jerry Sandusky.
ARTS

House of Cards

By JOE NOCERA
After the filming of "The Queen of Versailles," a documentary about an American Dream home bespeaking conspicuous wealth, the director and her subjects are at odds.
Arts & Leisure

Morning TV's Stepsister Feels the Ratings Heat

By MIKE HALE
A television critic monitors "Today" for a month to test the theory that the end of its 16-year run atop the morning-show ratings was the fault of its co-host Ann Curry.
Arts & Leisure

Sorry, Boss, but I'm Swamped

By NEIL GENZLINGER
An intrepid reporter for The New York Times and his editor braved a Louisiana bayou to determine the reality of the TNT reality series "The Great Escape." They barely escaped the alligators.
NEW YORK / REGION

Retired Horace Mann Teacher Admits to Sex With Students

By JENNY ANDERSON
Three former students described the actions of Tek Young Lin, a highly regarded former teacher at the Bronx school.

The Road to the Ironman

By JACQUES STEINBERG
Can a Wall Street warrior become an Ironman triathlete? Guy Adami, who was carrying a flabby 235 pounds on his 6-foot-3 frame, set out to find out for the New York-area race in August.

Police Make an Arrest in 3 Killings Near Columbia University

By COLIN MOYNIHAN
The police said that detectives had recovered the gun used in the triple killing and that a shirt found at the site tied the 30-year-old suspect to the crime.
MAGAZINE

When My Crazy Father Actually Lost His Mind

By JENEEN INTERLANDI
And what it took to get him the help he needed.

Ivan Lendl Gets Back to Tennis

By PETER de JONGE
Can the cranky old coach lead Andy Murray to his breakthrough win at a Grand Slam tournament - and lift Wimbledon's curse on British tennis players?

Kenneth Lonergan's Thwarted Masterpiece

By JOEL LOVELL
After "You Can Count on Me," Lonergan made what may be the best film of the decade. So why did you never get to see it?
EDITORIALS
Editorial

Still Depressed, After All These Years

With the possible exception of a euro zone meltdown, the housing market remains the largest threat to economic recovery.
Editorial

What Sheldon Adelson Wants

Mr. Adelson is writing the biggest political checks in history to Republicans to advance his personal, ideological and financial agenda, which is at odds with the nation's needs.
Editorial

Alabama's White Elephant

Federal taxpayers have spent almost $250 million on a new federal prison for women in Aliceville that should never have been built.
SUNDAY REVIEW
Opinionator

Nature: Now Showing on TV

By DIANE ACKERMAN
The more we exile ourselves from nature, the more we crave its miracle waters.
Op-Ed Columnist

All the President's Privileges

By ROSS DOUTHAT
With President Obama in the White House comes a sudden shift in Democratic views about the limits of executive power.
Op-Ed Columnist

Not-So-Crazy in Tehran

By NICHOLAS D. KRISTOF
Iran is a much more complex country than many in the West realize. A bit of humility and nuance is needed in responding to the country's bluster.
ON THIS DAY
On June 24, 1997, the Air Force released a report on the so-called "Roswell Incident," suggesting the alien bodies witnesses reported seeing in 1947 were actually life-sized dummies.