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Apr 14, 2012

NYT Global Update: Nigeria Tested by Rapid Rise in Population



TOP NEWS

Nigeria Tested by Rapid Rise in Population

By ELISABETH ROSENTHAL
With earth's population headed for 10 billion, much of the growth is in sub-Saharan Africa, where trends that have lowered birthrates elsewhere have not yet caught on.

U.N. Votes to Send Observers to Syria Amid a Shaky Truce

By NEIL MacFARQUHAR
The reports of the shelling of two neighborhoods on Saturday tested a tenuous cease-fire as a United Nations struggled to rapidly deploy observersons.

At Nuclear Talks, Iran and 6 Nations Agree to Meet Again

By STEVEN ERLANGER
The decision to hold a new round of talks on May 23 appeared to reflect what officials saw as a serious commitment from Iran.
World

Video: Africa's Population Peril

At current growth rates, sub-Saharan Africa, which now accounts for 12 percent of the world's population, will account for more than a third by 2100.
Opinion

Op-Ed Contributor

A Precarious Crossroads for Afghan Women

By MICHELLE BACHELET
In some ways the pace of change on women's issues has gone into reverse.
WORLD

Sudan and South Sudan Keep Up Their Border Attacks

By JOSH KRON
A reignited conflict over disputed territory continued into a second day of fighting, including aerial bombings.

Kim Jong-un, in New Position, Promotes 70

By CHOE SANG-HUN
The wave of promotions comes as North Korea's young leader deals with the aftermath of an embarrassing failure of a rocket launching.
BUSINESS

China Adjusts Currency Trading Rules

By KEITH BRADSHER
The Chinese government announced on Saturday that it would allow the renminbi to vary more in value against the dollar during each day's trading.

Spain Targets Tax Fraud to Counter a Recession

By RAPHAEL MINDER
Spain approved several measures to crack down on tax fraud, seeking to reassure investors that it can replenish its coffers amid a $35 billion squeeze in the budget.

Diamonds as a Commodity

By NATHANIEL POPPER
Some investment professionals are competing to turn the gem into a commodity that would become available to investors in exchange-traded funds the way gold has in recent years.
TECHNOLOGY

Behind Instagram's Success, Networking the Old Way

By SOMINI SENGUPTA, NICOLE PERLROTH and JENNA WORTHAM
The founders of Instagram, now multimillionaires after Facebook bought their app this week, were helped along the way by the tight web in the Bay Area tech scene.
Digital Domain

Social Networks, Small and Smaller

By RANDALL STROSS
On Path, FamilyLeaf and Pair, users can post information without fear of sharing with the wrong people.
Bits Blog

Wavii: A Facebook for Topics

By NICK WINGFIELD
Facebook has transformed how we keep tabs on friends, by training people. A site called Wavii opened to the public earlier this week that wants to do the same thing for topics.
SPORTS

Two South Africans Still Look to Secure Berths in Olympics

By JERÉ LONGMAN
The immediate Olympic futures of the runners Oscar Pistorius and Caster Semenya remained unclear after the national championships Saturday in Port Elizabeth.
Soccer Roundup

Player in Italy Dies After Collapsing During Game

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Livorno midfielder Piermario Morosini, 25, died Saturday after suffering cardiac arrest and collapsing on the field during his team's Serie B match at Pescara, Italy.

Liverpool and Red Sox: Same Owner, Parallel Debacles

By JERÉ LONGMAN
The Liverpool Reds and the Boston Red Sox, two of the sporting world's most visible, storied and valuable franchises, are both struggling while sharing the same owner, John Henry.
U.S. NEWS

Duplicating Afghanistan From the Ground Up

By MALIA WOLLAN
Military officials send recruits from across the country to Central California because it shares many agroclimatic characteristics with Afghanistan.

Experts Split on Possibility of Remains at Titanic Site

By WILLIAM J. BROAD
A federal ocean agency released an image that it says suggests that corpses are at the wreckage site, which officials are seeking to protect from salvagers.

In California, Economic Gap of East vs. West

By JENNIFER MEDINA
Along the coast, communities have largely bounced back from the recession, but inland areas are still struggling with high unemployment and a persistent housing crisis.
OPINION
Op-Ed Columnist

The Man With the Google Glasses

By ROSS DOUTHAT
The danger of isolation - or worse - in the rush to virtual communities."
Editorial

More Help for the Wealthy

Under the guise of helping small businesses, Republicans want new high-end tax cuts that would favor the wealthy and starve the government of needed revenue.
Op-Ed Columnist

A Veteran's Death, the Nation's Shame

By NICHOLAS D. KRISTOF
For returning soldiers, home has been deadlier than the battlefield. Some say the V.A. isn't doing enough to help.


The Washington Post | Today's Headlines: U.S. Secret Service agents leave Colombia over prostitution inquiry | Today's Highlights

The Washington Post

TODAY'S HEADLINES

TODAY'S HIGHLIGHTS
U.S. Secret Service agents leave Colombia over prostitution inquiry
Agents accompanying Obama sent home amid misconduct allegations including contact with prostitutes.
(By David Nakamura and Joe Davidson)

U.N.: No new penalties after North Korean launch
The U.N. Security Council stops short of imposing penalties, as some officials worry that cracking down could push Pyongyang to conduct a new nuclear test.
(By William Wan and Colum Lynch)

Obama, Romney and the ultra-rich
The candidates’ tax plans would have vastly different outcomes for the wealthy, offering a window into their disparate economic views.
(By Jia Lynn Yang)

Documents, blown case provide rare insight into FBI’s terrorism stings
A blown Pittsburgh sting and the court records from a 2010 case have provided details on a tactic used increasingly by the FBI since the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, in which suspects are monitored almost from the beginning of plots and provided with means to help them carry them out.
(By Peter Finn)

On TV, legions of ‘strategists.’ A few probably really are.
Networks love to identify talking heads as party “strategists.” “There are probably more Republican and Democratic analysts or strategists on TV than there are in real life,” one cable executive says.
(By Paul Farhi)

NATION
Documents, blown case provide rare insight into FBI’s terrorism stings
A blown Pittsburgh sting and the court records from a 2010 case have provided details on a tactic used increasingly by the FBI since the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, in which suspects are monitored almost from the beginning of plots and provided with means to help them carry them out.
( by Peter Finn , The Washington Post)

Bernard Rapoport, Dems’ patron, dies
The insurance magnate founded the Texas Observer and supported liberal and populist politicians.
( by Jim Vertuno , The Washington Post)

This is what your fun is worth
Fun is worth a billion bucks, provided you can get a user base half the size of the United States to install it on their iPhones.
( by Rob ‘CmdrTaco’ Malda , The Washington Post)

More National: Breaking National News & Headlines - Washington Post



METRO
Capital Bikeshare to sell helmets
The regional cycling program is offering the protective gear when people buy or renew memberships.
( by Mark Berman , The Washington Post)

Toasting the Titanic’s ‘brave men’
For the 33rd straight year, a small group will gather at the Titanic Memorial in Southwest D.C. for a midnight toast to sacrifice.
( by T. Rees Shapiro , The Washington Post)

Bill expected to oppose planned Costco gas station
Some Montgomery Council members want to force the planned Wheaton station to another site.
( by Victor Zapana , The Washington Post)

Some U-Va. tales are just too tall
Urban legends pepper tales retold to campus visitors. The school’s historian is trying to set the tour guide’s straight.
( by Jenna Johnson in CHARLOTTESVILLE , The Washington Post)

Religion Events
Religion events in the Washington area.
(, The Washington Post)

More Post Local: Washington, DC Area News, Traffic, Weather, Sports & More - The Washington Post


POLITICS
Mystery donor pays millions for anti-Obama ads
An anonymous donor has given $10 million to run ads attacking President Obama and his policies, escalating the money race that is defining the 2012 presidential campaign.
( by T.W. Farnam , The Washington Post)

Criminal probe sought in GSA case
The inspector general for the GSA asked the Justice Department to conduct a criminal investigation of the senior official at the center of the Las Vegas spending scandal, officials said.
( by Lisa Rein , The Washington Post)

Obamas’ 2011 tax returns: $790K earnings
The earnings represent a big drop from the $1.7 million that the first family reported in 2010.
( by David Nakamura and Tom Hamburger , The Washington Post)

U.S. Secret Service agents leave Colombia over prostitution inquiry
Agents accompanying Obama sent home amid misconduct allegations including contact with prostitutes.
( by David Nakamura and Joe Davidson , The Washington Post)

Bill expected to oppose planned Costco gas station
Some Montgomery Council members want to force the planned Wheaton station to another site.
( by Victor Zapana , The Washington Post)

More Post Politics: Breaking Politics News, Political Analysis & More - The Washington Post


STYLE
What’s an aunt to do with a spoiled nephew?
An aunt wonders how to deal with a spoiled nephew — and his twin, who’s an angel.
(, The Washington Post)

Fourth time’s the charm for Ian Svenonius
District native Ian Svenonius finds musical contentment with Chain and the Gang, the fourth of his inventive ensembles.
( by Patrick Foster , The Washington Post)

On TV, legions of ‘strategists.’ A few probably really are.
Networks love to identify talking heads as party “strategists.” “There are probably more Republican and Democratic analysts or strategists on TV than there are in real life,” one cable executive says.
( by Paul Farhi , The Washington Post)

Seeking an authentic Greek experience
Sure, the Mediterranean isles that surround the mainland are lovely. But the real Greece lies at its heart. The Acropolis, Delphi, Nafplio. Olympus, home of the gods. And Lidoriki, the writer’s ancestral home, which his grandfather departed 102 years ago en route to a new life in America and a new name: the WASP-y sounding Carden in place of Gardikys-Karandreas.
( by Bob Carden Special to The Washington Post , The Washington Post)

A space shuttle’s final landing
With the arrival of the shuttle Discovery at the Udvar-Hazy Center set for this week, here are some fun facts about the ship.
(, The Washington Post)

More Style: Culture, Arts, Ideas & More - The Washington Post


SPORTS
TV and radio listings: April 14

(, The Washington Post)

McLean outlasts Madison
BASEBALL | The Highlanders score the winning run on a throwing error in the bottom of the 14th to top the No. 5 Warhawks, 1-0.
( by Preston Williams , The Washington Post)

Werth delivers for Nats in 13th
With the bases loaded and one out in the bottom of the 13th, Jason Werth smacks a game-winning single through a drawn-in infield.
( by Adam Kilgore , The Washington Post)

Gaunt lifts Eagles to 2-1 win
GIRLS’ SOCCER | Sophomore Taylor Gaunt’s goal in the 78th minute helps No. 10 Freedom-South Riding knock off No. 3 Battlefield.
( by James Wagner , The Washington Post)

O. Park tops No. 1 Gar-Field, 2-1
BOYS’ SOCCER | Jonathan Mitchell’s long throw-in sets up Tyler Guerra’s game-winning goal with three minutes remaining.
( by Paul Tenorio , The Washington Post)

More Sports: Sports News, Scores, Analysis, Schedules & More - The Washington Post


WORLD
Documents, blown case provide rare insight into FBI’s terrorism stings
A blown Pittsburgh sting and the court records from a 2010 case have provided details on a tactic used increasingly by the FBI since the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, in which suspects are monitored almost from the beginning of plots and provided with means to help them carry them out.
( by Peter Finn , The Washington Post)

Syrians rally despite show of force
Death toll is far lower than last Friday despite bigger crowds; U.N. fails to agree on monitor mission.
( by Alice Fordham and Colum Lynch , The Washington Post)

Fans of Bo Xilai rally to ousted chief in China
Supporters of China’s “new left” take to the Web to show their dismay after Bo falls from favor.
( by Andrew Higgins , The Washington Post)

Islamists protest Mubarak-era candidates
In sign of polarization, liberals and revolutionaries called for separate march with same goal next Friday.
( by Leila Fadel , The Washington Post)

U.N.: No new penalties after North Korean launch
The U.N. Security Council stops short of imposing penalties, as some officials worry that cracking down could push Pyongyang to conduct a new nuclear test.
( by William Wan and Colum Lynch , The Washington Post)

More World: World News, International News, Foreign Reporting - The Washington Post


LIVE DISCUSSIONS
Should low-risk gay men be allowed to donate blood?
Banning gay men from donating blood
(, vForum)

Lisa de Moraes' TV Column Live
Post TV columnist Lisa de Moraes chats with readers about the latest in television!
(, vForum)

Real Wheels Live
Live online discussion with Real Wheels columnist Warren Brown about car-buying and the auto industry.
(, vForum)

The Fix Live
The Fix's Chris Cillizza discussed the latest in political news.
(, vForum)

More Conversations: Discussions, Blogs, Debates, Live Q&A's and More - The Washington Post


TECHNOLOGY
Facebook weighs in on cybersecurity legislation
Facebook has clarified why it supports CISPA, addresses privacy concerns
( by Hayley Tsukayama , The Washington Post)

New Ivy Bridge debut date rumors emerge
Intel will likely debut its much-anticipated Ivy Bridge processors on April 23, according to a report.
( by Sean Ludwig | VentureBeat.com , VentureBeat.com)

Facebook’s $1B Instagram deal only took 48 hours
The deal that shock the web took, from start to finish, just 48 hours, according to inside sources.
( by Jennifer Van Grove | VentureBeat.com , VentureBeat.com)

What is Philippe Starck’s big secret project?
Rumor had it that Philippe Starck was working on a secret project for Apple.
( by Hayley Tsukayama , The Washington Post)

Apple’s next big thing?
Designer Philippe Starck has Apple fans abuzz about a new project
( by Hayley Tsukayama , The Washington Post)

More Technology News - The Washington Post


EDITORIAL
Al-Qaeda’s man
There are good reasons Abu Zubaida has been detained.
( by Matthew Levitt , The Washington Post)

Let’s talk about women
The debate Obama and Romney should have.
(, The Washington Post)

Washington honors Titanic victims

(, The Washington Post)

Missing out on the Oxford-Cambridge race

(, The Washington Post)

Easter has not arrived yet for Orthodox

(, The Washington Post)

More Opinions: Washington Post Opinion, Editorial, Op Ed, Politics Editorials - The Washington Post


BUSINESS
Facebook weighs in on cybersecurity legislation
Facebook has clarified why it supports CISPA, addresses privacy concerns
( by Hayley Tsukayama , The Washington Post)

Smart-city technology gets a push overseas
Schneider Electric is testing software to manage power grids, pipelines, water networks and road traffic in cities around the world.
( by Francois de Beaupuy Bloomberg News , Bloomberg)

Deals: Don’t be a blooming idiot
Despite the stock markets’ gains, mutual-fund investors have moved en masse to bond funds. Why?
(, The Washington Post)

New Ivy Bridge debut date rumors emerge
Intel will likely debut its much-anticipated Ivy Bridge processors on April 23, according to a report.
( by Sean Ludwig | VentureBeat.com , VentureBeat.com)

Oil prices edge downward
If current trends continue, gasoline prices could drop ahead of summer driving months, which would bolster the economy.
( by Brad Plumer , The Washington Post)

More Business News, Financial News, Business Headlines & Analysis - The Washington Post

NYT: ALERT FGC BOLSA - FGC FINANCIAL MARKETS: Resurgent Beirut Offers a Haven in the Arab Spring



Alert Name: FGC BOLSA - FGC FINA
April 14, 2012

For Lebanese content to stay out of the storm, and for Arab visitors seeking respite from fear and uncertainty around the region, Beirut is a destination to enjoy life.

Some investment professionals are competing to turn the gem into a commodity that would become available to investors in exchange-traded funds the way gold has in recent years.

Kuka, a German maker of industrial robots, plans to expand its operations in China after rising sales in the country helped it post a record operating profit last year.

NYT Morning Business News | Today's Headlines: Solid Results at 2 Banks Bode Well for the Industry



TOP NEWS

Rocket Failure May Be Test of North Korean Leader's Power

By CHOE SANG-HUN and DAVID E. SANGER
A spectacular failure to put a satellite into orbit raises the question, American officials said, of whether Kim Jong-un will attempt to recover by staging a larger provocation.

In California, Economic Gap of East vs. West

By JENNIFER MEDINA
Along the coast, communities have largely bounced back from the recession, but inland areas are still struggling with high unemployment and a persistent housing crisis.

Behind Instagram's Success, Networking the Old Way

By SOMINI SENGUPTA, NICOLE PERLROTH and JENNA WORTHAM
The founders of Instagram, now multimillionaires after Facebook bought their app this week, were helped along the way by the tight web in the Bay Area tech scene.
QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"No air. I just could not breathe. That's when I thought, if I don't find this woman in a few minutes, we're both going to die."
MAYOR CORY A. BOOKER, of Newark, on rescuing a neighbor from a fire.

World

Interactive Feature: Iran, the United States and a Nuclear Seesaw

Far from a monolithic relationship, Iran and the United States have spent as many decades as friends as they have as enemies. And for most of the history, whatever the polarity, nuclear issues have played a role.
Opinion
Op-Ed Contributors

The State of Afghanistan

Come 2014, the most likely outcome in Afghanistan is a mixed one.
WORLD

Resurgent Beirut Offers Haven Amid Turmoil of Arab Spring

By ANNE BARNARD
For Lebanese content to stay out of the storm, and for Arab visitors seeking respite from fear and uncertainty around the region, Beirut is a destination to enjoy life.
The Saturday Profile

Beneath That Beguiling Smile, Seeing What Leonardo Saw

By SUZANNE DALEY
A researcher at the Prado, using high-tech tools, discovered that a copy of the Mona Lisa was most likely painted by someone sitting next to Leonardo da Vinci as he produced his masterpiece.

Seeking Nuclear Insight in Fog of the Ayatollah's Utterances

By JAMES RISEN
The C.I.A. is using the remarks of Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, to gain insight into the geopolitical gamesmanship now at play over Iran's nuclear program.
U.S.

One Fate in Tulsa for 3 Strangers Familiar With Struggle

By MANNY FERNANDEZ
A funeral was held for Bobby Clark, one of three people killed in a string of shootings on April 6, as prosecutors charged two suspects with first-degree murder and hate crimes.

U.S. Will Pay a Settlement of $1 Billion to 41 Tribes

By TIMOTHY WILLIAMS
American Indian tribes had challenged the government's handling of funds and natural resources held in trust.

Mammoth Lakes, Calif., Faces Bankruptcy

By NORIMITSU ONISHI
Mammoth Lakes, Calif., is considering bankruptcy because of its inability to pay a $43 million legal judgment in a development dispute dating back to 1997.
POLITICS

Romney Assures N.R.A. of Support for Gun Rights

By TRIP GABRIEL
Mitt Romney spoke to the National Rifle Association on Friday, seeking the support of a powerful group that has not always warmed up to him.

Obama, Like Buffett, Had Lower Tax Rate Than His Secretary

By MARK LANDLER
President Obama has cited the fact that the billionaire investor Warren E. Buffett pays less of his income in taxes than his secretary as an egregious example of an unjust tax code.

House Republicans to Tackle Ambitious Budget

By JONATHAN WEISMAN
The effort to slash tax rates and to cover the cost in savings from entitlement programs is seen by critics as futile.
BUSINESS
DealBook

Solid Results at 2 Banks Bode Well for the Industry

By NELSON SCHWARTZ and BEN PROTESS
Two of the nation's largest lenders, JPMorgan Chase and Wells Fargo, reported strong revenue growth on Friday, a surprise that could bode well for the rest of the industry and the broader economy.

Diamonds as a Commodity

By NATHANIEL POPPER
Some investment professionals are competing to turn the gem into a commodity that would become available to investors in exchange-traded funds the way gold has in recent years.

Unexpected Ally Helps Wal-Mart Cut Waste

By STEPHANIE CLIFFORD
The company, the nation's biggest retailer, worked with the Environmental Defense Fund in setting policies that would help the company reuse and recycle most of its waste.
TECHNOLOGY
Bits Blog

Wavii: A Facebook for Topics

By NICK WINGFIELD
Facebook has transformed how we keep tabs on friends, by training people. A site called Wavii opened to the public earlier this week that wants to do the same thing for topics.

Google Announces 2-for-1 Stock Split

By DAVID STREITFELD
The search giant also reported first-quarter revenue that rose 24 percent and earnings that slightly beat analysts' expectations.

Whistle-Blower Claiming Visa Fraud Keeps His Job, but Not His Work

By JULIA PRESTON
Jack B. Palmer says he has been harassed, given no work and denied bonuses since accusing his employer, Infosys, of misusing visitor visas.
SPORTS

Concern Raised Over Painkiller's Use in Sports

By KEN BELSON and MARY PILON
The anti-inflammatory drug Toradol has in recent years become a go-to elixir for baseball and football players, but little is known about the lasting implications, if any, for athletes.
Yankees 5, Angels 0

A Success on Opening Day

By DAVID WALDSTEIN
Nick Swisher hit a three-run double in the first inning and Hiroki Kuroda pitched into the ninth in his memorable Yankee Stadium debut.

Rodriguez Ties Griffey With Homer

By ZACH BERMAN
Former teammates in Seattle, Alex Rodriguez and Ken Griffey Jr. share fifth place on the career list, for now, with 630 home runs.
ARTS

Even the Three Stooges Needed Second Fiddles

By DAN BARRY
The films of the Three Stooges are populated with character actors who played dames and gangsters, judges and jurors, cops and nurses and shopkeepers and mad scientists.
Television Review | 'NYC 22'

Hitting the Streets in a Harlem Precinct

By NEIL GENZLINGER
Rookie police officers from a variety of backgrounds come together in the new CBS show "NYC 22."
NEW YORK / REGION

After Number of Gifted Soars, a Fight for Kindergarten Slots

By ANNA M. PHILLIPS
Nearly 5,000 children qualified for gifted and talented kindergarten seats in New York City public schools in the fall, 22 percent more than last year and more than double the number four years ago.

After Rescuing Woman From Fire, a Mayor Recalls His Fear and Focus

By JAMES BARRON
Mayor Cory A. Booker, who saved a woman from her burning house, said that "there was a time when I didn't think we'd make it out of there."

City's Top Technology Official Resigns Amid Clashes Over Troubled Projects

By DAVID M. HALBFINGER and MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM
The departure of the administrator, Carole Post, comes as the city is challenging the release of a report on a much-delayed modernization of the city's 911 system.
TRAVEL

Off the Coast of Spain, a Tranquil Biosphere Reserve

By SARAH WILDMAN
Minorca features 1,000 species of plants, more than 100 beaches, rustic hotels and an uncommon sense of calm.
Practical Traveler

When to Buy That Plane Ticket

By MICHELLE HIGGINS
How far in advance should you book a flight to grab the lowest price? Here's some advice for a variety of popular routes.
Q&A

A Hotel Insider Shares Secrets

By RACHEL LEE HARRIS
Anthony Melchiorri, host of "Hotel lmpossible," reveals the reviews to trust, how to get an upgrade and more.
EDITORIALS
Editorial

Republicans and the Gun Lobby

Republican politicians gathered at the N.R.A. convention are eagerly pandering to a powerful political lobby that is intent on making the nation's gun laws weaker.
Editorial

Frightening Fizzle

With a missile launch that defied the United States and the United Nations Security Council, North Korea's new leader has failed his own first test.
Editorial

In Yonkers, a Strong Dose of Reality

The dire numbers of the city's finances have been accompanied by an unusual and very welcome amount of plain talk and realism.
OP-ED
Op-Ed Contributor

Why North Korea's Rocket Mattered

By SUNG-YOON LEE
It's time North Korea was made to answer for its aggressive acts.
Op-Ed Columnist

Justice for Trayvon

By CHARLES M. BLOW
When a Florida family simply asked that the case involving the shooting death of an unarmed teenager be tried in a court of law, America responded.
Op-Ed Columnist

How to Prevent Oil Spills

By JOE NOCERA
Two years after the Deepwater Horizon disaster in the Gulf of Mexico, it's clear that fines are meaningless. Only the threat of prison time can change behavior.
ON THIS DAY
On April 14, 1865, President Lincoln was shot and mortally wounded by John Wilkes Booth while attending the comedy "Our American Cousin" at Ford's Theater in Washington, D.C. He died the next day.